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Pushingfordream
12-07-2013, 09:44 AM
Has anyone published in literary magazines or journals? Which ones?

I was wondering how hard it is to get a piece selected, I mean how competitive it is?
How many places do you typical submit a story at a time? How much does the initial publication matter, can't you just republish it again later?

Undercover
12-07-2013, 05:17 PM
I've been published in the Storyteller, Ruminate, Poetry Salzburg Review, Triggerfish, Ascent Aspirations, Homestead, Poetry Repairs, Poetry Cemetery, The Bible Advocate, The Skyline Review, Suspense Magazine...okay maybe I'll stop there but that's what comes to mind, but there's several more.

It's hard, I got a lot of rejections.
One story was sent to many places at a time, 20 maybe 30?
You can republish with the mention of your first publisher, giving them credit.

But I do novels now so I don't even know if some of these places are even around anymore.

Fruitbat
12-07-2013, 09:43 PM
Pushingfordream, it all varies hugely. Some pubs take almost everything they're offered. Others might only publish one of every three thousand submissions.

Some accept simultaneous submissions, some don't. Some also accept multiple submissions and some don't.

(Simultaneous= you can send the story to more than one publication at the same time. Multiple= you can send that particular publication more than one story at a time).

Some answer in a day, some take a year.

Once a story is published, most publications won't consider publishing it again. But then, some will.

There's a fee for duotrope but to me, it is definitely worth it. They list over 4,000 markets and have filters for all sorts of things to help you find the kind of publishers you're looking for, plus a section where you can easily keep track of your submissions. A newer one has come along now, Sub-Grinder. It's free but not nearly as complete as Duotrope. I hear Ralan's is good if you write SFF but I haven't tried it.

Pushingfordream
12-07-2013, 10:24 PM
Pushingfordream, it all varies hugely. Some pubs take almost everything they're offered. Others might only publish one of every three thousand submissions.

Some accept simultaneous submissions, some don't. Some also accept multiple submissions and some don't.

(Simultaneous= you can send the story to more than one publication at the same time. Multiple= you can send that particular publication more than one story at a time).

Some answer in a day, some take a year.

Once a story is published, most publications won't consider publishing it again. But then, some will.

I couldn't get by without Duotrope.com. There's a yearly fee but to me, it is definitely worth it. They list over 4,000 markets and have filters for all sorts of things to help you find the kind of publishers you're looking for, plus a section where you can easily keep track of your submissions. A newer one has come along now, Sub-Grinder. It's free but not nearly as complete as Duotrope. I hear Ralan's is good if you write SFF but I haven't tried it myself.

That service looks awesome! Has it helped you get published?

Fruitbat
12-07-2013, 10:28 PM
That service looks awesome! Has it helped you get published?

Oh, yes. :)

Undercover
12-07-2013, 11:59 PM
I used Duotrope religiously until they started charging. I would see if they have some trial first, but I'm sure they're still good.

Poetry and Short Story Market Guide books helped me too. If you get one, make sure it's the most recent copy. I know in the book publishing world, publishers come and go all the time, but ironically enough there's been small poetry mags and online journals that have been around forever. It also depends on what you want out of it, just to be published? (getting in an online mag/journal is easier than a print one) Some of those places only take 1-3% of their thousands of submissions. Some give a small token, some pay per word, some pay in contributor copies. (that's always nice.)

Pushingfordream
12-08-2013, 12:50 AM
Anyone been published in bigger literary magazine or journals like Harvard Review, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Brevity, ETC...

Undercover
12-08-2013, 01:04 AM
Anyone been published in bigger literary magazine or journals like Harvard Review, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Brevity, ETC...

Bigger than what? The ones I've mentioned? That's a bit crass. Both FB and I have given some good suggestions for you to start with. You could always Google, go to the library and do other research on your own instead of asking everyone here since you're looking for bigger and better literary and magazines or journals than? (compared to what I don't know.)

Pushingfordream
12-08-2013, 01:31 AM
Bigger than what? The ones I've mentioned? That's a bit crass. Both FB and I have given some good suggestions for you to start with. You could always Google, go to the library and do other research on your own instead of asking everyone here since you're looking for bigger and better literary and magazines or journals than? (compared to what I don't know.)

Ok well I'm sorry, thanks for your help. I have been researching for the last few hours.

Fruitbat
12-08-2013, 01:46 AM
Pushingfordream, I interpreted your question as just trying to get a feel for the playing field.

Duotrope lists only what the subscribers report. And, they tend to report acceptances than rejections, so it is not all that accurate. I'd say the real acceptance rates are (very roughly) maybe one fourth what Duotrope reports. Therefore, some of the ones you list probably accept one story in a thousand. And a high percentage of those will probably be big names.

Undercover
12-08-2013, 01:54 AM
Ok well I'm sorry, thanks for your help. I have been researching for the last few hours.

It takes a lot longer than just a few hours. And again, it really depends on what you consider a goal and accomplishment to being published in a magazine or journal, whether big or small, every writer has a different dream of being published. Some just want to be published, that's it. Some would like to develop a platform for their writing, some just do it as a hobby and others for money. I'll tell ya right now you're not going to make a lot of money just being published in mags and journals, however big or small. There's just not enough money in it to make a living on.

So it goes back to what do YOU want to accomplish in being published? And no matter how much we help you search on how to get published, only you know the question to that one.

Pushingfordream
12-08-2013, 02:01 AM
It takes a lot longer than just a few hours. And again, it really depends on what you consider a goal and accomplishment to being published in a magazine or journal, whether big or small, every writer has a different dream of being published. Some just want to be published, that's it. Some would like to develop a platform for their writing, some just do it as a hobby and others for money. I'll tell ya right now you're not going to make a lot of money just being published in mags and journals, however big or small. There's just not enough money in it to make a living on.

So it goes back to what do YOU want to accomplish in being published? And no matter how much we help you search on how to get published, only you know the question to that one.

Wow that's very intelligently said. I am going to think a lot about your and Fruitbats comments.

Fruitbat
12-08-2013, 02:18 AM
UC is right. I think the days when a writer could expect to make any kind of a living on short stories alone is long gone.

But if making money was my goal, McDonald's pays much better.

Of course, most of those who write novels would do better at McDonald's as well, but it's a better chance there of putting food on the table. :)

beckethm
12-08-2013, 02:18 AM
Getting published anywhere is hard. Even the relatively "easy" lit mags accept only about 10% of submissions (based on what I've seen on Duotrope).

Researching the markets may improve your chances of getting published. There's a lot of very fine work being published outside the big-name literary journals. (I'd be thrilled to have the publication credits that Undercover has, BTW.) You can look at regional publications, genre-specific journals, and themed anthologies. I'd recommend starting with Duotrope or another listings service (like Short Story Market or Poets&Writers). Duotrope lets you search by genre, theme, and word count, among other things, while the others just give a short description of the journals. But don't stop there. When you find a publication that looks like a possible match, check out its website. Read any stories they have available for free viewing. If they don't make stories available online, order a copy. You want to get a feel for what kind of work they typically publish. If the journal has a very avant-garde literary bent and you write heartwarming family stories, it's not going to be a good fit.

Once you've identified some markets that might be suitable for your work, submit to as many as you can, and then be prepared for the rejections. Because you will get far more rejections than acceptances. But if you've done your homework, hopefully something will click.

Fruitbat
12-08-2013, 02:24 AM
That's true, beckethm, except that Duotrope lists plenty of markets with very high acceptance rates as well.

Undercover
12-08-2013, 02:48 AM
From my experience, the paying ones were the hardest (and ya gotta wonder why...)

Anyway, if you're looking for monetary reward than poetry won't cut it. Writing short stories would be better. Specifically genre type, sci-fi and fantasy pays good (from what I remember) so does Horror. Definitely children's magazines. Highlights was paying up to 250 for a story (don't know if that's changed now, it's probably higher) I got a nice chunk of money from Suddenly Lost in Words which is for YA. I think it's like 5 cents a word. (okay I checked, it is) And they take stories up to 3K so if you were to submit a 3K and get accepted, you'll get 150 bucks which is on the high end.

And it wasn't until my 4th book that I was getting good money, so Fruitbat is right on the novel end too. Even getting paid with that is hard, very hard.

So Mickey D's wouldn't be a bad idea.

Pushingfordream
12-08-2013, 02:54 AM
Well I don't care about money. I just want my stories to be published. I want people to read my writing and hopefully one day have enough credentials to make signing to a publisher for a book easier.

CrastersBabies
12-08-2013, 04:45 AM
I have one in the Berkely Fiction Review and the Copper Nickel. I just got a nice, warm rejection by Glimmertrain. :)

blacbird
12-08-2013, 08:10 AM
You can republish with the mention of your first publisher, giving them credit.

Really? I wouldn't bet my house on this one.

caw

Undercover
12-08-2013, 08:33 AM
Really? I wouldn't bet my house on this one.

caw

Well I wasn't betting either and was able to do it, so...(unless things have massively changed...

Old Hack
12-08-2013, 01:20 PM
You can republish with the mention of your first publisher, giving them credit.

Not if you've sold all rights, you can't.

Whether or not you can go on to publish the works elsewhere, and within what time period, depends on your contract with the publisher.

Never assume you're ok to use the work again. It's not always the case.


UC is right. I think the days when a writer could expect to make any kind of a living on short stories alone is long gone.

But if making money was my goal, McDonald's pays much better.

Of course, most of those who write novels would do better at McDonald's as well, but it's a better chance there of putting food on the table. :)

Agreed on all points.


Well I don't care about money. I just want my stories to be published. I want people to read my writing and hopefully one day have enough credentials to make signing to a publisher for a book easier.

You don't need any credentials at all to sell a book to a publisher. All you need is a great book.


Really? I wouldn't bet my house on this one.

caw


Well I wasn't betting either and was able to do it, so...(unless things have massively changed...

You might have been able to do it, Undercover, but that's not the same thing as being legally entitled to do it. Please, everyone: check your contracts before you try to sell your previously-published works.

Undercover
12-08-2013, 05:44 PM
I never assumed Old Hack. I always checked with the publisher first, and at the time I always held the rights to it, so I knew what I was doing. Sorry if I didn't make that clear.

For example places I've dealt with:

Ascent Aspirations:

"Ascent Aspirations Magazine will accept previously published work on occasion, however we prefer unpublished work. We ask for first print or electronic publishing rights to any unpublished piece that its editors select. At the time of publication, all rights revert back to the author/artist. Full remains with the author. Should you decide to republish the piece elsewhere, we ask that you cite Ascent Aspirations Magazine as a place of previous publication and provide the Ascent Aspirations Magazine's web address. Each issue will be archived in the permanent feature section of the web page. The purpose of the publication is to promote aspiring writers and visual artists in their efforts to bring their work to the world. Unfortunately we are unable to pay at this time but we can and do provide promotion, exposure and advertising for our authors."

http://www.ascentaspirations.ca/guidelines.htm

But you're right tho OH, some won't even take previously published works. So yeah definitely check first.

Old Hack
12-08-2013, 09:11 PM
Undercover, my concern wasn't that you were offering previously-published works to publications which only wanted first rights: it was that you were implying that if one wants to resell previously published material all one has to do is credit the original publisher.

If you want to sell work which has already been published, it's essential to first check that the rights to that work are yours to sell.

Undercover
12-08-2013, 09:25 PM
Undercover, my concern wasn't that you were offering previously-published works to publications which only wanted first rights: it was that you were implying that if one wants to resell previously published material all one has to do is credit the original publisher.

If you want to sell work which has already been published, it's essential to first check that the rights to that work are yours to sell.

Got it. And again, didn't mean to sound confusing or unclear. Thanks for clarifying.

Phaeal
12-10-2013, 05:23 PM
If you enjoy writing shorts (stories/essays/articles), write them. If you want to get them published in the "prestige" mags or pro/semi-pro paying markets, sub and keep subbing. Be prepared for a long slog through rejections, but don't be surprised at a quick success. Hitting the right desk at the right time -- a situation largely out of your control -- can produce miracles. ;)

If you're only writing shorts to get credits, you might as well spend your time writing the longer works that are your real interest. You can sell a good novel or NF book with zero creds in the mags and journals.

Pushingfordream
12-10-2013, 08:29 PM
If you enjoy writing shorts (stories/essays/articles), write them. If you want to get them published in the "prestige" mags or pro/semi-pro paying markets, sub and keep subbing. Be prepared for a long slog through rejections, but don't be surprised at a quick success. Hitting the right desk at the right time -- a situation largely out of your control -- can produce miracles. ;)

If you're only writing shorts to get credits, you might as well spend your time writing the longer works that are your real interest. You can sell a good novel or NF book with zero creds in the mags and journals.

Awesome advice thanks so much!