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shakeysix
11-22-2013, 06:02 PM
Some of us must have 50 year old memories of this day. I know I do. I'd like to hear some of yours.

We were in school, St. Rose of Lima, in Great Bend, Kansas. We were just in from noon recess, waiting for a movie. In those days the entire school had to watch one movie at a time. It was shown in the auditorium and we sat in the dark for hours, grades 1-8, quietly watching. It was a treat for one Friday afternoon a month.

The girls were lined up for a restroom break when my friend's mother came running into the school. She had been washing windows, so carried a dripping sponge in her hand. Ladies in those days did not run and they did not go out in blue jeans and sweat shirts so, right away, we were frightened. She told us the president had been shot and then rushed over to tell our teachers.

The movie was cancelled and we prayed the rosary in the auditorium instead. The windows were darkened for the movie and no one opened them. The day was cold and gray outside. Later we went back to our classrooms. We were in the room for the announcement. They let us out early. Most kids walked in those days but that day our dad picked us up. All of the schools and all of the businesses were closed so there were a lot of people on the streets. Everyone was very quiet. Our Iwo Jima survivor dad had been crying. His face was all swollen and red. I have never forgotten the fear and sadness of that weekend. --ss

Kylabelle
11-22-2013, 06:10 PM
Somehow, I did not learn this news until I came home from school that day. And I was so excited, coming home, to tell my parents my news, which was that our choir at school was going to be on television! We had just learned this momentous news and I was very proud, especially because both my parents were musicians and I knew this would please them.

I remember I was greeted by my mother and she let me spill my news first, before telling me that I needed to know the President had been shot and killed. It was an odd moment, because neither of us could really take in the news the other was sharing, we each were so full of our own feelings.

Later, I felt a bit ashamed I had not been more upset about the President, but my joy had simply filled all the space and the President meant less to me than my own life.

The assassination took the shine off my success, and it was a while before any significance of the larger world made its way through to my feelings.

J.S.F.
11-22-2013, 06:26 PM
I was only around two when it happened, so I learned about it later on in school and on my own. My mother, a proud American, was appalled that such a thing could happen. Kennedy was no angel, but he did a lot of good and could have done more if given the chance. To her dying day, she thought that Oswald hadn't acted alone.

It's odd, just the other day I pulled out JFK for a re-watch. Granted, Oliver Stone has his biases in the matter, but it's still a compelling piece of filmmaking, and he raises a lot of points that no other filmmaker would ever dare to. It doesn't answer any of the questions, but it makes for good thinking on the subject.

shadowwalker
11-22-2013, 06:46 PM
I was in the fourth grade. The announcement (and I can't remember exactly what was said) was made over the intercom. What I do remember is my teacher, Mr Anderson, sitting down abruptly at his desk, putting his head in his hands, and crying. I also remember watching the funeral procession on TV, seeing the riderless horse and the caisson, and I will forever be haunted by the music played.

DeleyanLee
11-22-2013, 06:54 PM
I had turned 3 years old 4 days prior, so I have no memories of the assassination.

However, his funeral is my first memory. I remember sitting under the ironing board as the procession, watching the horses and the people--and getting sprayed with spray starch. The emotion is more annoyed at the spray starch than anything else.

augusto
11-22-2013, 06:54 PM
I was in 2nd grade and heard the news through the speaker on the wall that we got all our news from. School closed and we were hustled out of the building to our buses waiting at the curb. Our bus's crossing guard—a 6th grader, probably very popular—kept singing that song with the line: “Deep in the heart of Texas.” I remember thinking how she seemed to think this was terribly funny.

MaryMumsy
11-22-2013, 08:07 PM
For years, if you had asked me, I would have said he was killed on Nov 23. I was a freshman in high school, living on a military compound in Seoul South Korea, and it was already Sat over there.

A bunch of us gathered at the school. We were scheduled to take a trip to the demilitarized zone. The principal came and made an announcement about the assasination. He said that any students who wished to could return home. I don't remember whether any one did. But most of us continued on with the trip. Being a group of students who had spent most, if not all, of our lives associated with the military, we were well aware of the need to not show weakness. The trip was quieter than it otherwise might have been, but uneventful.

MM

Lavern08
11-22-2013, 08:22 PM
I was 11 years old.

I remember turning on the TV when I got home from school and watching Walter Cronkite's solemn face as he reported the news.

It was surreal and I felt as though someone had punched me in the stomach.

I'll never, ever forget the sadness of that day. :cry:

stormie
11-22-2013, 08:33 PM
I was in fourth grade. We heard Mother Superior's squeaky orthopedic shoes and her large rosary beads clattering as she walked down the corridor. We all sat up straight in dread of her soon-to-be wrath over some such thing like smiling in class.

But when she came in, she whispered something to Sister John Of The Cross, then abruptly left. Sister teared up. Wow, nuns cried! Must be something bad.

Then she told us. As nine year olds, we felt like it was the end of the world as we knew it. And, in a way, it was.

When I got home, my mother was in the kitchen, crying. It was the first time I ever saw her cry. She was a very private person with her emotions.

Haggis
11-22-2013, 08:49 PM
Senior year of High School. It was between classes and I walked up to my history teacher to ask her something. She told me to shut up which shocked the hell out of me. So I walked on to my next class--English--and the radio was playing over the speakers. Then we heard what had happened. At that time it was unknown whether the President was still alive. That soon changed. School was let out and we walked home. Everyone was pretty much glued to the TV for the next three days.

April Days
11-22-2013, 09:18 PM
I was in the third grade. It was after lunch and we were all waiting for our teacher to come back into the room. She was late.

When she finally came in, she was crying. I thought, wow, something must have happened to someone in her family. Then she told us. I don't think I really comprehended it until our family watched the TV coverage that whole weekend.

ishtar'sgate
11-22-2013, 09:32 PM
I remember. I was in class when the announcement came over the PA system. We were stunned into silence, some kids began crying. Even in Canada it had a huge impact. We were sent home from school. Everyone was so quiet. It was unthinkable. That's what I remember most.

Shadow_Ferret
11-22-2013, 09:39 PM
Honestly? I don't know. I was 6, probably in kindergarten, but any memories I have are of a collective nature, like a hive mind kind of thing, because I've heard about it over and over from so many people who were affected by it. I can't be sure if they're real memories or implanted ones.

Siri Kirpal
11-23-2013, 12:27 AM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

I was in 6th grade. We were outside during recess, playing hopscotch, I think. Someone came out and announced that the president had been shot. We were sent home. I don't remember anyone crying.

Now, my parents had voted for Nixon, and still being young (I had skipped a grade), I thought they would be pleased. Not so. My Dad was in the living room, home early from work, looking as miserable as I had ever seen him, though neither he nor my Mom cried. It was that moment that I grew up, and realized that human lives are more important than politics.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Robbert
11-23-2013, 03:39 AM
Fifty years ago, I was still in my nappies. The first time I saw it on TV was in the early 1970s. I remember I was shocked

a) that it was shown on telly and

b) that a person could do such a crime

Haggis
11-23-2013, 06:06 AM
Does anyone else remember the other losses we suffered that day? One was personally huge to me--Aldous Huxley I was and remain a big fan. C. S. Lewis also died that day. Neither of them got the media play they deserved. Obviously.

shakeysix
11-23-2013, 06:18 AM
No. I was a little young for Aldous Huxley. I did know C.S. Lewis but didn't think of him.

Watching the old news footage I am surprised at how many of the now deceased news men I remember almost like family friends. Not just the big ones like Walter Cronkite, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley but Hugh Downs, Douglas Edwards, Frank McGee and so many more--all men who seemed wonderfully wise, trustworthy and calm. No screaming, no drama, no accusations. News reporting has changed too. I never realized the impact they had on my childhood.--s6

Haggis
11-23-2013, 06:55 AM
No. I was a little young for Aldous Huxley. I did know C.S. Lewis but didn't think of him.

Watching the old news footage I am surprised at how many of the now deceased news men I remember almost like family friends. Not just the big ones like Walter Cronkite, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley but Hugh Downs, Douglas Edwards, Frank McGee and so many more--all men who seemed wonderfully wise, trustworthy and calm. No screaming, no drama, no accusations. News reporting has changed too. I never realized the impact they had on my childhood.--s6
I think it's because those guys (notice they were all guys then) came from a background of journalism. It's different today. News is entertainment. Ratings are more important than anything. Not that I'm bitter about it. Much. But at least we now have women reporting. And minorities too. But it's less about news and more about ratings. That's a passing of sorts too.