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DoNoKharms
11-21-2013, 09:05 PM
EDIT: You guys basically answered my question, which is that it's a sticky situation without a clear answer; I'm guessing it's situational based on the level of revision. I'll mull over this some more on my own. Thanks for your help!

Siri Kirpal
11-21-2013, 10:50 PM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Wow! Congrats!

Go ahead and send the revised version. And explain why you're sending it. Highly unlikely that the agent would be offended. And one who is isn't one you'd like to work with.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

goddessofgliese
11-21-2013, 11:25 PM
You probably also want to consider if it's fair to agent A if you decide to accept the offer for representation from agent B or C. I remember once I read in Miss Snark's blog that she helped whipping an author's work into a greater shape, but afterwards he accepted another agent's offer for representation. Miss Snark was very unhappy about that, because she spent a lot of time helping that author.

mellymel
11-22-2013, 03:00 AM
You probably also want to consider if it's fair to agent A if you decide to accept the offer for representation from agent B or C. I remember once I read in Miss Snark's blog that she helped whipping an author's work into a greater shape, but afterwards he accepted another agent's offer for representation. Miss Snark was very unhappy about that, because she spent a lot of time helping that author.

This is what I was thinking. If you revised off notes that agent A took the time to write up and give you and then offered rep based on the fact that you took his/her notes/ideas to heart and it was just what he/she was looking for, then I can't imagine how terrible it would feel to have the writer turn around and say, thanks for making my novel better but I'm going to go with someone else who loved my MS with your notes incorporated. JMO, and I guess you have to do what feels right. Not sure what the protocol/etiquette is on this (if there is any), but my gut tells me that it wouldn't seem right.

Anyway, Super Congrats on all the interest and best of luck whatever you decide!

Parametric
11-22-2013, 03:13 AM
You probably also want to consider if it's fair to agent A if you decide to accept the offer for representation from agent B or C. I remember once I read in Miss Snark's blog that she helped whipping an author's work into a greater shape, but afterwards he accepted another agent's offer for representation. Miss Snark was very unhappy about that, because she spent a lot of time helping that author.

I hear what you and other posters are saying, but I do think that an agent in that situation has invited the problem upon themselves. They could have signed the author first, they could have insisted on an exclusive, they could have simply asked the author not to use their revision notes to land another agent - but they didn't. If they leave the author free to shop the improved manuscript elsewhere, that's exactly what will happen.

mellymel
11-22-2013, 04:54 AM
I hear what you and other posters are saying, but I do think that an agent in that situation has invited the problem upon themselves. They could have signed the author first, they could have insisted on an exclusive, they could have simply asked the author not to use their revision notes to land another agent - but they didn't. If they leave the author free to shop the improved manuscript elsewhere, that's exactly what will happen.

Just curious, but what's the best way to handle an exclusive when other agents have fulls? If you have it out with other agents, can you give exclusivity? Should you? I've read that giving exclusives is never in the best interest of the writer, but perhaps that's regarding a requested full only? I'm genuinely asking because I do not know and this situation is interesting but I'm sure it's happened before and I want to be more knowledgeable about it. I do agree that the agent could have signed them first and then ask them to revise but it seems from what I've seen that R&R's are pretty common pre-signing. No? Would love to hear agents' take on this.

Old Hack
11-22-2013, 01:46 PM
EDIT: You guys basically answered my question, which is that it's a sticky situation without a clear answer; I'm guessing it's situational based on the level of revision. I'll mull over this some more on my own. Thanks for your help!

With the exception of our Share Your Work rooms, it's not usually appropriate for people to delete their posts here just because they've got the advice they wanted. Discussions on AW are for everyone, not just the person who started the thread. Please don't do this again.


Just curious, but what's the best way to handle an exclusive when other agents have fulls? If you have it out with other agents, can you give exclusivity?

If the full is already out with other agents then you can't grant an exclusive to any agents who might subsequently request it.

You can, however, send it in with a note that other agents already have it so you can't give them the exclusivity they've requested; but that you won't accept any offer without first letting them know, and giving them an appropriate time to finish reading the work.

You could also offer to not send out any more fulls which might be requested but I'd probably not go that far. Exclusives help out agents, not writers, and I don't like them.

Quickbread
11-22-2013, 08:13 PM
You could also offer to not send out any more fulls which might be requested but I'd probably not go that far.

I did this with the agent I just signed with. I had a full out with another agent, so I couldn't grant her the two-week exclusive she asked for. But I promised to not send it to anyone else during that time. That seemed to satisfy her. What's two weeks really? And I had very few queries out anyway, so it was an easy decision. Plus, I was contacting her after she'd had my full last year but ultimately passed. I felt like if she was enthusiastic enough to take another look, she deserved some time with it. She ended up only taking a week anyway.

Here's a case where I think the agent asks for exclusives because she is very hands-on and editorial. It's a lot of time and energy to dive into a manuscript so deeply, so I can understand a time-limited exclusive request. In fact, this agent passed on my novel the first time after I got an offer from another agent. I have a feeling it's because she didn't want to put time into my manuscript under such pressure knowing the odds were 50/50 or less that I'd sign with her. So in my case with her recently, the semi-exclusive was beneficial to me, too. It gave her the space to really focus on my manuscript enough to fall in love with it -- even though it still needs some work.

mellymel
11-23-2013, 03:43 AM
Thanks Old Hack and Quickbread for the 411. :)