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View Full Version : Can I mention candy crush saga in my novel?



Foolonthehill
11-14-2013, 04:05 PM
As some of you might remember due to a previous thread, the main character in my book has made quite a decent amount of money by selling apps. I was wondering whether I could mention candy crush saga as a comparison (which incidentally was also created by an Italian like my character) or would I be going against some kind of copyright?
Ps, any idea how much money the candy crush saga creator might have made?

Torgo
11-14-2013, 04:11 PM
Yes, you can. Just don't libel King (the makers of Candy Crush.) I think King were valued at about $5 billion - they're floating on the stock market soon (or maybe already have.)

Frankly I find $5 billion crazy money - it's more than twice what Zynga was valued at, and look how that turned out.

wendymarlowe
11-14-2013, 07:07 PM
Something to keep in mind, though - you're going to date your book quickly if you reference Candy Crush and then it doesn't stay popular. (Kind of like if you had your characters chatting on AOL or Friendster . . .)

Torgo
11-14-2013, 07:30 PM
Something to keep in mind, though - you're going to date your book quickly if you reference Candy Crush and then it doesn't stay popular. (Kind of like if you had your characters chatting on AOL or Friendster . . .)

Yeah, but dating your book isn't always a bad thing. As long as the reader knows that AOL is some kind of social interweb site, you don't lose any meaning. By the time a book written now comes out, Candy Crush will likely be history, but it's clear it's a mobile game, so there isn't really a problem.

You can set your book in a sort of timeless bubble where all contemporary references are smoothed out, but it doesn't seem to win you much. Imagine scouring all the c. refs from James Bond novels, for instance - all the luxury products and things - it'd denature them. Because Bond's 1960s lifestyle is now appealingly retro, they've acquired a nostalgic charm.

What you need to avoid is using c.rs as contextless shorthand - so something like saying 'he made Kato Kaelin look like Joey Buttafuoco'. Without any other context, that description is going to go stale pretty soon. (God knows if that example means anything, because I think we may be over that threshold already and I can't really remember who either of them are.)

Calla Lily
11-14-2013, 07:38 PM
*scours memory*

Was Kaelin OJ's permanent houseguest?

Buttafuoco was the guy who slept with the Long Island Lolita. Said young lady then shot Buttafuoco's wife in the head. I believe the wife survived.


Case in point from my writing: I wrote a vampire mystery purely for my own pleasure. A few years later, under the "Why Not?" heading, I subbed it to HQN digital. Got a lovely and complimentary R&R. One of the issues was the dating. A character uses a PDA--I wrote the book when iPhones were still in the process of taking over the world. Also I reference the old TV show Mr. Ed--as in, a character looks like said horse. the HQN editor felt that the reference would be lost on the target demographic.

When I get to the R&R, I'll certainly change these things.

Sheryl Nantus
11-14-2013, 07:50 PM
I'd just say "an addictive match-the-candy game". There's plenty of games on the market like that trying to cash in on the Candy Crush idea right now and it'd be something everyone can relate to.

blacbird
11-14-2013, 10:28 PM
I don't have a clue what "Candy Crush" is, and therefore believe I've been blessed in some special way.

That aside, I agree with what Sheryl just posted. Making it slightly generic with a simple description like that gives information to the uninitiated, and makes your story that much easier to comprehend.

caw

jennontheisland
11-14-2013, 10:38 PM
Unless the name is specific to the plot there's no reason to mention it. A generic reference is all you need.

Foolonthehill
11-14-2013, 11:11 PM
thanks guys, fab as usual!