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Draconess25
11-11-2013, 08:28 AM
Yes, I am well aware that cauterizing wounds usually does more harm than good. It increases the risk of infection and doesn't even work a lot of the time. BUT Tiana doesn't know all that. She's a firekin, so she can heat up her pinkie red-hot and trace it along the edge of a wound, and that was the first solution that popped into her head.

Her best friend Gianni is injured. He's a healer, but he's currently drifting in and out of consciousness, so he can't tell her how to treat his wounds. Her school gave a brief lecture on cautery when she was a kid, so she figures her only option is to use her power to (try to) help. I know cautery isn't the best solution, so that's why I wanna know how it would REALLY affect these wounds.

1: 2 inch long cut across right jaw down to the bone.

2: Stab wound in left shoulder, about 2 inches deep and 1 1/2 inches in diameter.

3: A an upside-down U-shaped 8 inch long gash on his right bicep. The flap of skin is hanging down and exposing muscle.

4: A similar wound on his left inner thigh, but it's a regular U-shape, not upside-down. I think these would be considered avulsions.

5: A stab wound 2 inches above his right knee (the guy was trying to get at his groin but kept missing) about as big as the stab wound in his shoulder.

6: An 8 inch long horizontal gash on the left side of his lower abdomen. About half an inch deep.

Like I said, I know cautery isn't the best idea, but Tiana doesn't know that. If it would seal a particular wound, that's what I'll have happen. If it won't work, and the blood will just keep coming, she'll freak out and try to find another solution. Luckily, Gianni is an elf, so I have a bit of leeway on how much crap he can survive.

GeorgeK
11-13-2013, 09:39 PM
Congratulations.

I think that this might be the first (assuming I haven't forgotten some which is possible) thread where cautery might be applicable. He's a healer, but needs to survive long enough to do his spells. She will do a little damage with her burns to buy him that time. Burns are not occlusive so they won't wall in infection like the way that sutures can. The deep wounds are into muscle, not into vital organs.

I'm a surgeon and actually have no complaints about this fantasy scene, except of course that there's fantasy healing magic and my main complaint about that is that I couldn't do that.

GeorgeK
11-13-2013, 09:40 PM
Congratulations.

I think that this might be the first (assuming I haven't forgotten some which is possible) thread where cautery might be applicable. He's a healer, but needs to survive long enough to do his spells. She will do a little damage with her burns to buy him that time. Burns are not occlusive so they won't wall in infection like the way that sutures can. The deep wounds are into muscle, not into vital organs.

I'm a surgeon and actually have no complaints about this fantasy scene, except of course that there's fantasy healing magic and my main complaint about that is that I couldn't do that.

GeorgeK
11-13-2013, 09:47 PM
Any Mod, there are problems. The system said it didn't take my first post. Apparently it did, because now it's double, but the various ways to delete the double post have 1, kicked me off the site, 2, moved me to another site, 3, told me I wasn't authorized, 4, put me back into the edit mode

I leave it in your hands

King Neptune
11-13-2013, 10:09 PM
I'm not a surgeon, but if I were the healer in question, I woul prefer that she practice her sewing. From what I understand of cauterizing, it is excellent for massive wounds such as battlefield amputations, and it can be good for things that are nor healing well, but a slash usually will heal well if the sides are bandaged together and left for a while.

MDSchafer
11-13-2013, 10:23 PM
From what I understand of cauterizing, it is excellent for massive wounds such as battlefield amputations.

No, actually the exact opposite is true. Cauterization is best for small issues. It's mostly used internally.

The most common use for external cauterization is circumcision, and that's a very small surface area on a very small infant. I don't have a real problem with using cauterization for arrow wounds and other non-life threatening injuries, but you're burning tissues, and burns are bad.

Draconess25
11-13-2013, 11:33 PM
Congratulations.

I think that this might be the first (assuming I haven't forgotten some which is possible) thread where cautery might be applicable. He's a healer, but needs to survive long enough to do his spells. She will do a little damage with her burns to buy him that time. Burns are not occlusive so they won't wall in infection like the way that sutures can. The deep wounds are into muscle, not into vital organs.

I'm a surgeon and actually have no complaints about this fantasy scene, except of course that there's fantasy healing magic and my main complaint about that is that I couldn't do that.

Unfortunately, he can't magically heal himself, just others. BUT he does know how to treat injuries and infections without magic. She doesn't. All she knows how to do is burn things, stab things, communicate with mushrooms, and cook. And sew. But that didn't cross her mind yet.

CoolBlue
11-14-2013, 12:50 AM
The cautery will turn viable tissue into dead tissue.

The reason it worked better than nothing in the past, at least occasionally, is that it:

1. Cauterizes most blood vessels, stopping bleeding. Good luck with a big artery!
2. Kills non-victim tissues. Read bacteria.

Of course, you are left with dead tissue that the body needs to take care of.

I agree that these wounds may benefit from cautery. The shoulder could be a problem - if it enters the joint, the joint will never work well again.

So, better chance of surviving than before, bigger, uglier scars, and destroyed joint if that is involved. But then, it was injured already.

HTH
CB

CoolBlue
11-14-2013, 01:02 AM
A few more thoughts.

Here is what "might-could" happen:

The wound she cauterizes is a mass of bleeding flesh. After the cauterizing is done, the bleeding stops, and then resumes in one spot where the artery is. It pumps out in time to his heartbeat. She tries again, similar result. Putting pressure on the wound works. If they leave it there long enough, it may eventually work, as blood clots and seals off the artery

Some pointers:

Blood vessels that are mangled, rather than cleanly cut, will better seal off themselves. Cautery mangles things.
Arteries are extremely sensitive.
Cautery releases smoke, and smells bad. Think burned steak and hair.

HTH
CB.

Draconess25
11-14-2013, 01:26 AM
A few more thoughts.

Here is what "might-could" happen:

The wound she cauterizes is a mass of bleeding flesh. After the cauterizing is done, the bleeding stops, and then resumes in one spot where the artery is. It pumps out in time to his heartbeat. She tries again, similar result. Putting pressure on the wound works. If they leave it there long enough, it may eventually work, as blood clots and seals off the artery

Some pointers:

Blood vessels that are mangled, rather than cleanly cut, will better seal off themselves. Cautery mangles things.
Arteries are extremely sensitive.
Cautery releases smoke, and smells bad. Think burned steak and hair.

HTH
CB.

I figured his shoulder would be permanently damaged either way. Which is fine. Human or not, my characters are imperfect people with weakness, and they have to deal with those weaknesses. It'll definitely be harder for him to shoot a bow, but he'll eventually adapt.

And I intended for her to get sick from the smell. xD She's burnt people before, but she doesn't much like it.