PDA

View Full Version : NYT-Article - Exposure is what you die of when you can't pay the rent



Maxinquaye
10-27-2013, 07:40 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/27/opinion/sunday/slaves-of-the-internet-unite.html?ref=todayspaper&_r=1&

NOT long ago, I received, in a single week, three (3) invitations to write an original piece for publication or give a prepared speech in exchange for no ($0.00) money. As with stinkbugs, it’s not any one instance of this request but their sheer number and relentlessness that make them so tiresome. It also makes composing a polite response a heroic exercise in restraint.

People who would consider it a bizarre breach of conduct to expect anyone to give them a haircut or a can of soda at no cost will ask you, with a straight face and a clear conscience, whether you wouldn’t be willing to write an essay or draw an illustration for them for nothing. They often start by telling you how much they admire your work, although not enough, evidently, to pay one cent for it. “Unfortunately we don’t have the budget to offer compensation to our contributors...” is how the pertinent line usually starts. But just as often, they simply omit any mention of payment.

I just wanted to post this article here because it's so good, and the content needs to be said. The title of the post comes from one of the comments of that piece.

In an age where the container of data is what is supposed to determine the value of the data in the container, ie digital goods should be close to free, more articles like this should be published.

Asking people to work for free is rude. Accepting work for exposure, or very low pay, damages all writers everywhere.

Cyia
10-27-2013, 07:50 PM
Makes me think of this:


It all started when DN Lee, who runs the Urban Scientist blog on the prestigious Scientific American network, got asked to do some blogging (http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/urban-scientist/2013/10/11/give-trouble-to-others-but-not-me/) for Biology-Online.
It would be a monthly article, he said, and she would have to wait two weeks before she was allowed to repost the blog on her own site.
Advertisement
“Regarding payment,” editor “Ofek” replied in response to her question. “Truthfully, we don’t pay guest bloggers”.
“Thank you very much for your reply,” DN Lee said. “But I will have to decline your offer. Have a great day”.
It should have stopped there. Why should a respected blogger and scientist provide content to a website for free?
But instead, Ofek decided to send this reply:
“Because we don’t pay for blog entries? Are you an urban scientist or an urban whore?”


http://www.dailylife.com.au/news-and-views/dl-opinion/scientist-called-a-whore-because-she-wouldnt-work-for-free-20131017-2vp07.html

ap123
10-27-2013, 08:01 PM
Thank you for posting this, I think it's so important.

jjdebenedictis
10-27-2013, 10:01 PM
Yeah, it's such irksome "logic".

I would get exactly the same amount of this oh-so-precious exposure if you published my work--and paid me for it.

It's like trying to get someone enthused about the awesome wrapper you plan to give them instead of a candy bar.

Bookewyrme
10-27-2013, 10:26 PM
I've seen this sort of article posted elsewhere, usually on private blogs, but one thing I saw in the NYT piece that I haven't seen elsewhere so much is the idea that this is a cultural phenomenon. And I think this is SO important to think about. Because it's not just a case of stupid/greedy/thoughtless/clueless individuals asking this sort of thing. All sorts of people get sucked into this cultural trap of thinking of artistic work as "easy" and someone's "hobby." I am the child of artists, raised in a community of artists, and a writer myself, and I have still been guilty of this myself. Anyway, I think it's something we need to work to change about our culture, and the first step is to be sure not to give it away for free ourselves.

One of my favorite Lois McMaster Bujold books, A Civil Campaign has a great line about this, which has always stuck with me. One character is hiring another for design work, and the second is still so new and unsure of herself that she doesn't think she deserves be paid for something so "easy" as that. The hiring character replies with this

"Never"," said Kareen with passion, "ever suggest they don't have to pay you. What they pay for, they'll value. What they get for free, they'll take for granted, and then demand as a right. Hold them up for all the market will bear."
It's true, and important, and I for one will not give my writing away for free, even if it means I never get published.

Tirjasdyn
10-27-2013, 10:27 PM
Having had to fight for pay, and declining offers for no pay I want to reiterate how important this is to get out. The fact the NYT printed this is tremendous as most sites that deal with this are preaching to the choir. Exposure is Something You Die Of has been a rallying cry for awhile.

Alessandra Kelley
10-27-2013, 11:00 PM
Thank you, Maxinquaye. I read this article this morning and had been contemplating starting a thread here about it.

This is the most disheartening thing about being an artist (and clearly about being a writer also). I don't really have words for it, but it turns my heart to lead whenever someone asks me for work and offers me only praise, if that.


I’ve been trying to understand the mentality that leads people who wouldn’t ask a stranger to give them a keychain or a Twizzler to ask me to write them a thousand words for nothing. I have to admit my empathetic imagination is failing me here. I suppose people who aren’t artists assume that being one must be fun since, after all, we do choose to do it despite the fact that no one pays us. They figure we must be flattered to have someone ask us to do our little thing we already do.

Thank you, Tim Kreider.

Sai
10-27-2013, 11:31 PM
This hits close to home for me. I'm giving a couple of talks at a local sci-fi convention, and I was hoping I could get a guest pass or even just a discount on the entrance fee seeing as I'm running two panels. Nope. I think their volunteer policy is pretty fair (you have to volunteer at least four hours to qualify for a volunteer badge) but I'm still creating content for them for free, and I have to buy my way in to do it? It doesn't still well with me, and I've been trying to justify it (I'm doing this to help other writers, I will get my money's worth by having as much fun as I can at the rest of the con) but gah.

Sorry for the rant. Thanks for the links!

Mr Flibble
10-27-2013, 11:35 PM
I agree most wholeheartedly except...

Ok, except we often DO write stuff just for the exposure. Blog tours/guest posts etc. Unless you all are getting paid for yours? Cos I ain't.

I don't see the harm in someone asking for a single post from you -- it's done with regularity, by many many writers, without a squeak and we don't usually get paid for it. As long as the asker understands that it's not always possible. There' sno excuse for being rude, on either sides. In other words, I see little difference between a short blog post and a short piece of fiction, except I find fiction easier...

Regular input, or something that'll take a lot of time is another matter. Something I can bang out in an hour? Well, if I calculate how much I made per hour for my last novel...that's, um, *calculates quickly* about £5* prolly!


*actually the gods only know. But it takes a fair few hours to write a novel. I'm pretty quick, and it's still a chunk o'time compared to a blog post.

So I think it's more "take it on a case by case basis". And if you ask, don't be surprised if the writer says no, because we'll all have different reactions depending on what you'r asking us, what time we have, and how much benefit we see out of it. I'm more likely to write a quick free piece for a site that has a regular million views than I am for somene whose only visitor is his mum.

Maxinquaye
10-28-2013, 12:03 AM
Well, I generally follow John Scalzi's rule about non-payment. “Fuck you, pay me. (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2012/12/09/a-note-to-you-should-you-be-thinking-of-asking-me-to-write-for-you-for-free/)” And saying that, like he explains, isn't me being the asshole, it's the one asking for freebies. :D

Then, I write for free for my own blog, of course, but I do that for fun and not for profit. And it's mine. When I'm writing for me, it's for fun. When I'm writing for others, I'm on th clock. To continue Scalzi's explanations.

Note that when I say, “writing for my own blog”, I really mean “realising after three months that I have one, and feeling panicky that I should update it”. That, basically, goes for all my social media these days.

Filigree
10-28-2013, 12:06 AM
I judge on a case by case basis, and most of the time I say 'no' now. My blog is free, so is my fan fiction. My published stuff is not. Neither is my art. When someone suggests I am a sellout for not offering free artwork for charity, claiming 'we can give you exposure', I point out that Yale and nine other universities pay me for my work. Artwork that their students are writing papers about. Not to mention my several hundred private collectors. I have exposure already.

Same with prose markets. Why would I send my writing to a low-paying or free market, unless it offers amazing street cred?

I am so glad to see this article.

Mr Flibble
10-28-2013, 12:09 AM
Well, I generally follow John Scalzi's rule about non-payment. “Fuck you, pay me. (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2012/12/09/a-note-to-you-should-you-be-thinking-of-asking-me-to-write-for-you-for-free/)” And saying that, like he explains, isn't me being the asshole, it's the one asking for freebies. :D



He shoulda paid me for that guest post I did on his blog then, huh? Not really -- it was great exposure, and it didn't take hardly any time, so no, I didn't expect to get paid, same as I don't get paid for any guest posts I make.

For a quick blog/article/interview/giveaway/cover reveal post, most (fiction) writers don't get paid, or expect to be, and they do them all the time. If that is the case, then you can't be surprised when people ask you to do stuff for free. Because you already are.

Then again, they shouldn't be surprised if you politely say no. No harm in asking, as long as you don't get offended by a polite answer imo.

DeleyanLee
10-28-2013, 12:09 AM
I agree most wholeheartedly except...

Ok, except we often DO write stuff just for the exposure. Blog tours/guest posts etc. Unless you all are getting paid for yours? Cos I ain't.

See, I don't take this as the same thing.

I write posts for my blog for my own reasons, just like I write my books. No one's asking me to do it. I just do it. It's like my crocheting baby blankets. I make them and give them to friends and family because I want to.

However, when someone asks me to make one for their friend or family, it becomes a commission. They want it a particular color, a particular whatever and it's not what I might want to do with the next blanket I make. I don't see why I shouldn't be compensated for my time, talent and materials doing something for them when I could be doing something for me. (They're multi-color Celtic knotwork afghans, so it takes me 3-4 months to make one, so it's not an afternoon thing.) Of course, I could choose to do it for free, but I resent the attitude that just because I make them for fun, I shouldn't charge anything for them, not even materials.

Writing's the same way. It's still my time and talent being occupied, that I'm not able to work on my own stuff. Unless I choose to give that away for free, I don't see why I shouldn't be compensated for it in some practical terms. Any expectation that I shouldn't is very irking.

Mr Flibble
10-28-2013, 12:12 AM
See, I don't take this as the same thing.

I write posts for my blog for my own reasons, just like I write my books. No one's asking me to do it. I just do it. It's like my crocheting baby blankets. I make them and give them to friends and family because I want to.

I'm talking about doing posts for other people's blogs. Not my own. Being asked to write something for someone else, as stated in the OP.

I think on it on a case by case basis myself. If it sounds like fun and it won't take long, sure. If you want me to do a weekly article, or it's going to be a grind, or take too much time, pay the hell up.

DeleyanLee
10-28-2013, 12:19 AM
I'm talking about doing posts for other people's blogs. Not my own. Being asked to write something for someone else, as stated in the OP.

I think on it on a case by case basis myself. If it sounds like fun and it won't take long, sure. If you want me to do a weekly article, or it's going to be a grind, or take too much time, pay the hell up.

QFT, though I find doing blog posts to be a grind and take up too much time, just for my own blog. I can't imagine doing it for someone else.

Xelebes
10-28-2013, 01:56 AM
As a person who does my own artwork as a hobby first, asking me to engage in any contract that requires timeliness or regular contribution would have me asking for money. It is hard for me to hit deadlines when I have no incentives to meet them.

cornflake
10-28-2013, 08:13 AM
I completely agree with the article in the OP. However, it's kind of completely hilarious to me that the NYT of all places, published that.

The NYT, absolutely notorious for paying freelancers crap, because, well, you get printed in the NYT.

lolchemist
10-28-2013, 10:26 AM
These kinds of situations remind me of the unpaid internship dramas that happen all the time too. Those poor kids get treated like indentured servants for the sake of 'exposure and education' when in reality a lot of them are literally doing jobs paid employees should be doing. This 'for the exposure' scam needs to be curtailed from all directions. People need to be *PAID* for the work that they do.

frimble3
10-28-2013, 10:37 AM
See, I don't take this as the same thing.

I write posts for my blog for my own reasons, just like I write my books. No one's asking me to do it. I just do it. It's like my crocheting baby blankets. I make them and give them to friends and family because I want to.

However, when someone asks me to make one for their friend or family, it becomes a commission. They want it a particular color, a particular whatever and it's not what I might want to do with the next blanket I make. I don't see why I shouldn't be compensated for my time, talent and materials doing something for them when I could be doing something for me. (They're multi-color Celtic knotwork afghans, so it takes me 3-4 months to make one, so it's not an afternoon thing.) Of course, I could choose to do it for free, but I resent the attitude that just because I make them for fun, I shouldn't charge anything for them, not even materials.

Writing's the same way. It's still my time and talent being occupied, that I'm not able to work on my own stuff. Unless I choose to give that away for free, I don't see why I shouldn't be compensated for it in some practical terms. Any expectation that I shouldn't is very irking.

And, if you start doing stuff for free just because people ask, it gets harder to charge when you do want to.
"What, you did it for him, and her, and them, and those! Why won't you do it for me?"
It goes back to if you do it because you want to, it's fine, but if there's an expectation that you'll just hop to it, not so fine.

bearilou
10-28-2013, 04:02 PM
Well, I generally follow John Scalzi's rule about non-payment. “Fuck you, pay me. (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2012/12/09/a-note-to-you-should-you-be-thinking-of-asking-me-to-write-for-you-for-free/)” And saying that, like he explains, isn't me being the asshole, it's the one asking for freebies. :D

I was poised ready to link his post. It's a good one.


Note that when I say, “writing for my own blog”, I really mean “realising after three months that I have one, and feeling panicky that I should update it”. That, basically, goes for all my social media these days.

Yeah. I feel you on this one.

Alessandra Kelley
10-28-2013, 04:08 PM
And, if you start doing stuff for free just because people ask, it gets harder to charge when you do want to.
"What, you did it for him, and her, and them, and those! Why won't you do it for me?"
It goes back to if you do it because you want to, it's fine, but if there's an expectation that you'll just hop to it, not so fine.

QFT, and this is the pernicious thing about all that promised "exposure."

The only thing doing work for free does is tell people you will do work for free.

I think that focusing on the artists is less effective than focusing on the people who make demands of them.

I think there needs to be more social awareness and social pressure that asking an artist for free art is unacceptable, outrageous even.

I think Tim Kreider's comparison of people who ask for free art to the jerks who constantly insult women in the hopes of getting one to have sex with them is apt.

Barbara R.
10-28-2013, 04:23 PM
I completely agree with the article in the OP. However, it's kind of completely hilarious to me that the NYT of all places, published that.

The NYT, absolutely notorious for paying freelancers crap, because, well, you get printed in the NYT.

Yeah, but at least they pay. If freelances held out for venues that pay well, they'd starve to death.


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/27/opinion/sunday/slaves-of-the-internet-unite.html?ref=todayspaper&_r=1&


I just wanted to post this article here because it's so good, and the content needs to be said. The title of the post comes from one of the comments of that piece.

In an age where the container of data is what is supposed to determine the value of the data in the container, ie digital goods should be close to free, more articles like this should be published.

Asking people to work for free is rude. Accepting work for exposure, or very low pay, damages all writers everywhere.

Totally agree. The trouble is, the urge to get published is as fierce and unrelenting as the urge to have children when that strikes a person. When I was a literary agent, I had to have the "You don't work for free!" talk with nearly every client. This was in Israel, where most writers were not represented and publishers took full advantage of that.

Do you all know Harlan Ellison's rant (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mj5IV23g-fE)on the subject? I listen to it every time I'm tempted to submit a piece to the Huff Post.

Phaeal
10-28-2013, 05:01 PM
As I look over my Duotrope list of short story markets, I find -- surprise! -- that the highest prestige pubs are those that pay at a professional rate, then a few who pay at semi-pro rates. (This is SFF pubs; some lit mags with high prestige might pay little to nothing or copies, but I haven't looked much into this sector lately.)

I guess the part of the brain that assigns values is all like, "Whoa, somebody paid that writer 25 cents a word (Tor.com, highest rate I'm aware of.) She must be GOOD."

As far as I'm concerned, people can ask for free work as long as they accept my "no" with good grace and my occasional "yes" with the only gratitude that really means something: Cookies.

:e2cookie:

ap123
10-28-2013, 05:15 PM
I completely agree with the article in the OP. However, it's kind of completely hilarious to me that the NYT of all places, published that.

The NYT, absolutely notorious for paying freelancers crap, because, well, you get printed in the NYT.

QFT --I know several well established, well regarded freelance journalists, all have mentioned being asked to write more for lower rates--or yes, even free--from prestigious pubs.

cornflake
10-28-2013, 09:14 PM
Yeah, but at least they pay. If freelances held out for venues that pay well, they'd starve to death.


The majority of people I know who've written for the Times on a freelance basis - the Times pays worse than pretty much anyplace else they write for. It's the Times, though, so they do it. They bitch, but they do it.

yayeahyeah
10-28-2013, 09:51 PM
I'm talking about doing posts for other people's blogs. Not my own. Being asked to write something for someone else, as stated in the OP.

I think on it on a case by case basis myself. If it sounds like fun and it won't take long, sure. If you want me to do a weekly article, or it's going to be a grind, or take too much time, pay the hell up.

Thanks for raising this point, Mr Flibble. As a blogger who runs a fair amount of guest posts from authors - on average perhaps 1 guest post and 1 interview a week over 2 blogs - the original post had me wondering whether it's okay to ask authors to contribute. I quite often get approached by authors/publicists themselves, and when I'm going to them, I always try to make it clear that I'm aware they're busy people so completely understand if they aren't able/don't want to contribute. I wish I COULD pay them, but as a hobby blogger who makes nothing from either blog, it's sadly not something I could afford to do!

Any authors out there who've written guest posts for blogs/been approached to write them, how do you feel about them?

Mr Flibble
10-29-2013, 12:11 AM
Any authors out there who've written guest posts for blogs/been approached to write them, how do you feel about them?


Well, I think I've established I'm normally happy to do them lol. Most authors I know (Mostly SFF) seem to do them fairly regularly, and I'm pretty sure they don't get paid either.

But there really is a lot of variation -- and often it won't depend just on what you're asking (Article? Interview? Flash fiction -- more divisive that one) but on what is going on the author's life too. We've got deadlines, dayjobs, sick kids, exploding boilers...And it'll depend on the author as well. Some loathe doing blog posts (I prefer it if you can give me a subject, cos I'm crap at that bit), some don't see the point, some will only do it if you've got X readership.

I really don't think there's harm in asking*, particularly if you're not making money from your blog at all. It might (as you say) be worth adding that if time is an issue or they want to be paid etc, then you won't have a hissy fit if they say no!

*Others might think there is. But you won't know unless you ask, right?

blacbird
10-29-2013, 12:37 AM
This phenomenon, by the way, is not unrelated to the defense of digital content piracy that often gets made, especially among younger people these days.

caw

Fuchsia Groan
10-29-2013, 01:10 AM
This is my main rationale for not torrenting TV shows, though my friends who do it, some of them content providers themselves, say I'm being ridiculous and piracy only screws the big corporations.

My sister, who makes web videos for pay, gets a lot of these solicitations. She's continually being asked to "just bring your camera to our play/fundraiser and support us, OK?" The people who ask don't realize that making a watchable video involves hours of tedious editing.

Some of the more prestigious university literary mags I used to submit to don't pay, such as Conjunctions, I think. Most of the people they publish are supported by academic salaries rather than their writing, so it makes a kind of sense. That's one case where I'd accept exposure as a fair trade.

I'd probably do a guest blog post if I had time and it seemed like fun, especially if it was for an operation unlikely to be able to pay me. But I'm used to getting paid for my journalism now. Often very little, but getting paid nonetheless, and I'd like to keep it that way.

I was kind of shocked when I found out my favorite blog, the big one with national reach, pays freelancers less than the small newspaper I work for. I don't like it. But for exploitation in the intellectual realm, little compares with the practices of universities who pay adjuncts a few grand with no benefits to teach huge introductory courses, and tell them they are "apprenticing."

Just say no, unless it's something you can do for pleasure, or the exposure factor has real weight. I write fiction for pleasure and doubt that will change any time soon. I need to get paid for something.

Turhan
10-29-2013, 01:44 AM
Thanks very much for your compliments on my writing. I’m flattered by your invitation to write a 1500 word piece on 'Why writers matter to the economy' for free. However, it is work, it takes time, it’s how I make my living, and in this economy I can’t afford to do it for free.

My counter offer to you is this. You pay my fee now, $400 and just as soon as I earn $800 from hit's I get from your site, I'll pay you back your $400 fee.

I look forward to doing business with you in the near future.

Best Regards
Vulkezan

Tazlima
10-29-2013, 02:12 AM
In my younger days, I did a fair bit of performing and I got suckered more than once by the "Come do a free show. It'll be good publicity and help you book other shows" spiel. It's actually true. Gigs like that WILL help you book other performances. Other performances that also pay nothing.

I eventually drew a line. If anybody involved in planning the event was getting paid, I got paid too. It didn't have to be a lot. If it was a charity event I'd take $20 or even a free meal, but I refused to perform for nothing.

I only ever found one group that was formed of 100% volunteers. It was a group that worked alongside social services and provided things that weren't covered in the state's budget. They hired me to do a magic show at a kid's birthday party. The birthday boy was turning thirteen, the oldest of seven. Their mother had died a few months before, there was no father in the picture, and the kids had been split up among a bunch of different foster homes. They couldn't find a foster home for the oldest, so he had been housed at juvenile hall for lack of a better option (and he was SUCH a nice kid). The charity arranged this party so that the siblings could see each other. It was the first time they'd been together since their mother's death. THAT show I did for free.

Mr Flibble
10-29-2013, 03:14 AM
I eventually drew a line. If anybody involved in planning the event was getting paid, I got paid too.

I think that's a great line -- most of the posts I do are for bloggers who aren't making any money from it, so I wouldn't expect to get paid, or other authors (who aren't, as such, making money from their blog)

But if someone who makes a living from it, at least partially, well then.

RedWombat
10-29-2013, 09:26 PM
I do a monthly column for a eco-gardening blog...but it's a topic I feel strongly about, and I tell myself I am helping to fight the good fight. Since the site barely makes the money to keep the lights on, I don't worry about it, and I appreciate the community of other authors. (Frankly, they pay me in IDing the bugs and plants I can't figure out in my garden!)

But it also doesn't have the priority mentally that paying gigs do--I'll bump it in favor of a real deadline every time.

Barbara R.
10-30-2013, 02:53 AM
Any authors out there who've written guest posts for blogs/been approached to write them, how do you feel about them?

I've been asked many times, and I've written a few guest blogs; then I wised up. It takes me hours to write anything I'm willing to put my name to. And then, when I'm done, I want either to post it on my blog or sell it to a paying venue, not give it away.

But I don't mind people asking---I don't think they're crossing any ethical lines by doing so, and in fact I've solicited guest posts for my own blog. Every writer does his/her own calculations. For many, depending on the level of exposure, it may be worth writing a post for free in exchange for the chance to promote one's books.

On the other hand, I'll do interviews for anyone who asks, because it doesn't take me much time and if I do it well, it directly benefits my own books.

And that's my mercenary take on the matter!

Yorkist
10-30-2013, 03:09 AM
I just want to say that you guys are making me happy, because I am virtually unpublished (aside from a couple of regional mags in high school or so that no one remembers) and I have been asked to do guest blogs solely because some people elseweb liked my writing and thought I was hilarious.

Not for money, but that is okay by me.

DancingMaenid
10-30-2013, 04:47 AM
Well, I generally follow John Scalzi's rule about non-payment. “Fuck you, pay me. (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2012/12/09/a-note-to-you-should-you-be-thinking-of-asking-me-to-write-for-you-for-free/)” And saying that, like he explains, isn't me being the asshole, it's the one asking for freebies. :D

Then, I write for free for my own blog, of course, but I do that for fun and not for profit. And it's mine. When I'm writing for me, it's for fun. When I'm writing for others, I'm on th clock.

This is how I feel. I don't mind writing for free on my own terms--I write for fun, and I don't expect payment for my blog or my fanfic. For that matter, I don't have a problem displaying some of my original fiction for free on my blog or on free display sites.

I might also be willing to do some free writing non-profit websites and organizations. In some cases, I'd just consider that volunteer work.

But generally, if someone wants me to write for them, I think I deserve to be treated professionally--and that means payment. The only reason I see to write for someone (which usually involves some control on their part) or to publish with someone is if it will benefit me, and to me, exposure isn't a good enough reason. Especially if someone would typically be paid for what I'm doing.

Bookewyrme
10-30-2013, 05:10 AM
I eventually drew a line. If anybody involved in planning the event was getting paid, I got paid too. It didn't have to be a lot. If it was a charity event I'd take $20 or even a free meal, but I refused to perform for nothing.

THIS is an EXCELLENT line in the sand, I think. And also, a very important distinction in this discussion. If no one is getting paid/making a profit in the equation, well then I might still not do the writing, but I wouldn't be insulted to be asked. But if anyone is making a profit, I think the content-creator should be right at the top of that list, you know? Anything else is simply insulting to the time, effort, and sweat that goes into creation.