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lcg
10-18-2013, 02:56 PM
I am trying to search for the various mediums in painting. I want to write about a character who earns living by selling paintings via small company. Any information is appreciated.

buz
10-18-2013, 03:03 PM
Can you be more specific about a) what you mean and b) what time period we're talking about?

Here's (http://painting.about.com/od/artglossarym/g/defmedium.htm) a quick intro to the various things "medium" can mean in painting...so I'm not quite sure which thing it is you're looking for :)

King Neptune
10-18-2013, 03:45 PM
I am trying to search for the various mediums in painting. I want to write about a character who earns living by selling paintings via small company. Any information is appreciated.

You probably should find some artists who work in various media and see how they get by. There aren't many visual artists who earn a living by selling their work. Most of the sales that happen are through galleries or direct from the artist. If you intend the "small company" to be a gallery, then that part of the premise is not unreasonable. You might also visit a small gallery and see if the owner will share any information.

Alessandra Kelley
10-18-2013, 04:51 PM
Can you be more specific about a) what you mean and b) what time period we're talking about?

Here's (http://painting.about.com/od/artglossarym/g/defmedium.htm) a quick intro to the various things "medium" can mean in painting...so I'm not quite sure which thing it is you're looking for :)

I would not rely on ask-dot-com for useful explanations. That article confuses the issue by listing examples of a few things a medium could be (as if, for comparison, a list of a few foods would define what food is and does). The issue is not nearly so confusing as the article writer seems to think.

In painting, a medium is a binder which holds pigment particles in order to make a paint. In drawing a medium is usually the drawing tool. The plural is media.

The most common media for painting are: linseed oil, water-soluble acrylic resin, and gum arabic and water (watercolors and gouache use this). Lesser known ones include egg yolk, wax, and various glues.

The most common media for drawing are: ink, graphite pencil, charcoal, crayons (wax-based), and pastels (usually pure pigment held together with dried gum arabic).

Each medium has its own properties and distinct usages. If you have specific questions I'd be glad to answer them.

melindamusil
10-18-2013, 09:43 PM
You say she earns a living by selling paintings, but you haven't actually said that these are paintings that SHE paints.

I have a friend who earns a living by selling artwork (among other things) on ebay and directly to sellers. He buys the paintings on ebay, etsy, at art auctions, on several art websites, and from other sources that even he won't reveal. He sells the paintings to doctor's offices, hotels, private homes, schools, you name it.

If she is selling her own artwork, have you looked on etsy? Just about everything on there could fall under the umbrella of "artwork", though it's not all paintings. I also have friends who sell their artwork (including paintings) on etsy - although none of them are earning a living from it.

Canotila
10-19-2013, 12:18 AM
I would like to add, that for many artists it's not the sale of original paintings that generate the most income. Once the original is sold, it's gone. It's prints and items you can print images on. Several of my artist buddies who make a living doing 2D work (I mostly do sculpture) refer to prints as their bread and butter. A couple of them even refuse to sell originals, preferring to place those in friend's homes where they have access to them for gallery shows and things.

KTC
10-19-2013, 12:55 AM
Your question is far too vague. There are so many mediums. Maybe you're looking for a site that explains different mediums and artistic terms, etc. Sounds like you want other people to do a thorough research project for you. If you're not a painter, you will have to research this quite thoroughly, not just throw out a vague question like this...

lcg
10-22-2013, 09:29 AM
I am sorry for the delay in replying. Since this is my first post, I was unaware that we do not get automatically subscribed to the post we make. Extremely sorry.

I know I have to do the research, and this was not a mean to shirk work. I just wanted to have a beginning point to start. :-)

The character is based on someone I know. They are husband-wife duo. One of them paints based on the commission basis for weddings, anniversaries or general gifting and other markets it. That's what I want my character to do-- art on commission basis. Is it too unrealistic for a person?

lcg
10-22-2013, 09:33 AM
In painting, a medium is a binder which holds pigment particles in order to make a paint. In drawing a medium is usually the drawing tool. The plural is media.

The most common media for painting are: linseed oil, water-soluble acrylic resin, and gum arabic and water (watercolors and gouache use this). Lesser known ones include egg yolk, wax, and various glues.

The most common media for drawing are: ink, graphite pencil, charcoal, crayons (wax-based), and pastels (usually pure pigment held together with dried gum arabic).

Each medium has its own properties and distinct usages. If you have specific questions I'd be glad to answer them.

Thanks a lot! This is the list I was looking for. It gives me a point to start from. I know about oil, acrylic and water, though I haven't heard about the gum. I will research and PM you the questions. Thanks again for the help.

lcg
10-22-2013, 09:38 AM
I would like to add, that for many artists it's not the sale of original paintings that generate the most income. Once the original is sold, it's gone. It's prints and items you can print images on. Several of my artist buddies who make a living doing 2D work (I mostly do sculpture) refer to prints as their bread and butter. A couple of them even refuse to sell originals, preferring to place those in friend's homes where they have access to them for gallery shows and things.

Oh. This never crossed my mind. Indeed, prints sound more lucrative than the original. I will add it to the work profile folder. Thanks a tonne for the idea.

shaldna
10-22-2013, 03:28 PM
I personally like to mix my medium. Currently I'm rocking the water colour background and then a mix of oils and acrylics - I find you can get some interesting effects when you mix oil and acrylic as they both dry at different speeds.

I went through a real 3d phase a few years ago where I liked to add things to my paint, such as sand, to build it out of the canvas.

When it comes to art anything goes and you can use any medium you like. And I mean ANY medium - just look at Gilbert and George - but not while you are eating lunch.

KTC
10-22-2013, 04:27 PM
I did work on commission years ago. I believe a lot of people do it, so I don't see it being a problem for your character. I used oils, watercolours, etc...even charcoal. I tried to do whatever was asked of me. Your character could either have a specialty, or simply work in mixed medium. I would suggest that this is up to you.

melindamusil
10-22-2013, 10:38 PM
LCG- is it possible for your character to work on commission? Sure. You said yourself that you know someone who does this.

As far as medium - there are really no limits. I always enjoyed working with pastels. My sister used to make marker/acrylic or colored pencil/acrylic paintings. But I have seen artists using just about everything imaginable - garbage, tires, food, legos, sidewalk chalk, etch-a-sketch... You just need to decide what kind of medium best fits with your character.

lcg
10-25-2013, 09:29 AM
Thanks a lot for the replies. I think I'll go ahead with working with many mediums with specialty of water and acrylics. Those are the two I know max about. I will include prints and reprints option as well.

In fact after talking here, I found out a person in my FB friend list who does work in this. But she mainly sells the prints to the magazines.

Thanks once again for giving a kick-start to my brain.