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keston925
09-25-2013, 04:27 AM
Hi there,

Who do you send queries to and why? Should you try to get an agent or a publisher?

Confusing....

Also... do you just send out mass queries.... like 100 at a time?

Thanks so much guys

Keston

Kayley
09-25-2013, 04:56 AM
Hi Keston,

It depends on what you want to get out of your book. The traditional path to publishing is to query an agent, who then pitches the book to publishers. If you're hoping to get with one of the big five, your best bet is to get an agent first, because they won't be likely to accept unsolicited manuscripts. However, if you are aiming to go with small or e-publishers, you might be able to get on without an agent.

Agents provide benefits of being able to get you in the door for big publishers, as well as other things like contract negotiations. It's up to each individual person whether getting an agent is right for them, but agents can be very useful in the publishing process.

I suggest perusing these forums more, because there is loads of information available about submitting to agents vs. publishers.

When you do send out query letters, it's generally recommended to do so in small batches, so that you'll have the opportunity to edit the query letter if your first batch of responses is negatory. However, you'll want to make sure you have a well-constructed query letter before sending any out. To do so, check out the Query Letter Hell subforum that we have here (it's under the Share Your Work forum.) You'll need to get 50 posts before you can put your query letter up for critique, but it's worthwhile.

keston925
09-25-2013, 05:21 AM
Thank you so much. I have been on these boards only a few hours and already I have found your advice invaluable.

CrastersBabies
09-25-2013, 05:41 AM
Yeah, definitely do NOT send out 100 queries to agents. You will burn your possibilities in a matter of weeks. Send 10. If you get no response or request for full/partial, rework the query letter. Send 10 more. This is the system I've heard. Others will have different suggestions.

Siri Kirpal
09-25-2013, 05:53 AM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

You can go into Query Letter Hell (password is vista)now and read the posts and add your own critiques. You just can't post your query until you hit 50 posts. You can and should also go into the Share Your Work section that's relevant to your genre. Again, you need 50 posts to post your work, but you can read and critique now. Same password.

If your book has a small niche market, you're better going it alone. If so, query publishers one by one. Very few take simultaneous submissions. Otherwise, try to get an agent first. They can open doors you otherwise wouldn't be able to open.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

WeaselFire
09-25-2013, 04:21 PM
Welcome to AW. You may want to learn how to use the search functions here, this topic is discussed regularly and you can find answers faster than waiting for them.

Jeff

keston925
09-25-2013, 06:37 PM
Thank you every one!

Another dumb question.... where can I find Query Letter Hell? is it on these forums?

Siri Kirpal
09-25-2013, 09:52 PM
Sat Nam! (Literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Scroll below to forum jump. You'll find Query Letter Hell listed in the Share Your Work section. The first time you click on that, you'll be asked for the password. It's vista.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Little Ming
09-25-2013, 10:20 PM
Query Letter Hell (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=174) Password: vista

You can't post your own work until you reach 50 posts, but you can help critique for others in the meantime. It is also strongly recommended for you read the stickies and follow several ongoing threads before jumping in so you get a feel for the forums and the other critters. It's called "hell" for a reason. :evil

gingerwoman
10-08-2013, 02:01 PM
Yeah don't send out 100 at a time. If you do, and then you get a good feedback rejection from someone on how to improve what you sent, it's too late to fix it.

Undercover
10-08-2013, 03:33 PM
All great suggestions for you, Keston. I agree small amounts at a time so in case you need to revise something, you'll have a better submission to send for the next batch.

quicklime
10-08-2013, 05:10 PM
Query Letter Hell (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=174) Password: vista

You can't post your own work until you reach 50 posts, but you can help critique for others in the meantime. It is also strongly recommended for you read the stickies and follow several ongoing threads before jumping in so you get a feel for the forums and the other critters. It's called "hell" for a reason. :evil

Acronym for Hugs, Elation, Love, and Learning???

LOTLOF
10-08-2013, 05:53 PM
Acronym for Hugs, Elation, Love, and Learning???

Or...

Horrendous Embarrassment Loathing and Lecture

Becky Black
10-08-2013, 06:08 PM
It can depend on what you're writing and who publishes it too. Some publishers will accept submissions direct to them, rather than via an agent. Those are usually small presses producing genre fiction, rather than the great big publishing houses - though even there they might have what's called an Imprint that accepts unagented submissions. Of course having an agent to look out for you and negotiate better deals is never going to hurt, and some writers get the offer from the publisher first, then get an agent to take them on to negotiate it, but that's rarer than the other way around!

But while you can send out to several agents at a time, some publishers may request "no simultaneous submissions", so it can only be with one at a time. Others are cool with you submitting elsewhere at the same time as long as you keep them updated on if you have an offer and especially if the book is no longer available. (Just because you hear nothing doesn't mean nothing it happening with your submission.) Always check their website thoroughly to see if they will take submissions and if you can submit elsewhere at the same time.

quicklime
10-08-2013, 06:31 PM
Or...

Horrendous Embarrassment Loathing and Lecture


maybe you misread the critiques :-p

gingerwoman
10-09-2013, 02:46 PM
It can depend on what you're writing and who publishes it too. Some publishers will accept submissions direct to them, rather than via an agent. Those are usually small presses producing genre fiction, rather than the great big publishing houses - though even there they might have what's called an Imprint that accepts unagented submissions. Of course having an agent to look out for you and negotiate better deals is never going to hurt, .
Well actually it could. I've read other authors say many times that having a bad agent is worse than no agent. You have to do your research.

Becky Black
10-10-2013, 12:15 PM
Well actually it could. I've read other authors say many times that having a bad agent is worse than no agent. You have to do your research.

Well true. :D I should have said a good agent.

Undercover
10-10-2013, 02:09 PM
It can depend on what you're writing and who publishes it too. Some publishers will accept submissions direct to them, rather than via an agent. Those are usually small presses producing genre fiction, rather than the great big publishing houses - though even there they might have what's called an Imprint that accepts unagented submissions. Of course having an agent to look out for you and negotiate better deals is never going to hurt, and some writers get the offer from the publisher first, then get an agent to take them on to negotiate it, but that's rarer than the other way around!

But while you can send out to several agents at a time, some publishers may request "no simultaneous submissions", so it can only be with one at a time. Others are cool with you submitting elsewhere at the same time as long as you keep them updated on if you have an offer and especially if the book is no longer available. (Just because you hear nothing doesn't mean nothing it happening with your submission.) Always check their website thoroughly to see if they will take submissions and if you can submit elsewhere at the same time.

This is pertaining to the first paragraph. I could never figure out how to section off a quote, anyway. There are more and more big publishers opening the doors to unagented submissions. A lot of them are digital first, but there's also (like Becky mentioned) imprints that are a division of the parent companies.