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View Full Version : Southerners! What's weird about the North? (US)



holy_shiitake
09-25-2013, 04:08 AM
This is a question for American Southerners - my MC is moving from Tennessee to Massachusetts for college. What was the strangest thing for you to get used to up North? Food wise, lifestyle wise, etc? What did you like about it? Thanks in advance!

Cath
09-25-2013, 04:20 AM
I've added US into the thread title since we have folks from all over the world contributing.

Maggie Maxwell
09-25-2013, 04:22 AM
No sweet tea. In the south, you ask for it at a restaurant and you get tea that's had sugar or sweetener added while it was being brewed. It's cold and, well, sweet, sometimes teeth-rottingly so. Go north of Virginia and ask for sweet tea, and you get looked at like you just grew a second head (or told they only have unsweetened tea.) If you're accustomed to getting it while you're out to dinner, it's hard to get used to.

5thBananaSplit
09-25-2013, 04:48 AM
When you're walking down your own neighborhood street in the middle of the day and you pass someone going the other way and they do their level best to not look at or acknowledge you're there at all.

In other words...small civilities.

holy_shiitake
09-25-2013, 05:15 AM
I went to school in Raleigh and have Southern relatives so I kinda have dual citizenship as it were... and yes, small civilities and lack of sweet tea are two huge drawbacks to living in the North!

vagough
09-25-2013, 05:37 AM
In Massachusetts -- at least, in areas around the Boston region -- "regular" coffee isn't black coffee. It's served with milk. (Blech, I don't like milk in my coffee, so this was an unpleasant revelation.)

RhettSumner
09-25-2013, 05:45 AM
Agree on the absence of Sweet Tea! Most weird to me is the dialect and use of words like Pop for soda, or various forms of you guys instead of y’all. Oh yea, and winter. Here in Charleston SC winter begins and ends around February. Cold aint funny y’all!

holy_shiitake
09-25-2013, 05:50 AM
"You guys" is so much less elegant than "y'all", or even "all y'all". I grew up in CT and I grew up calling it soda and didn't know anyone who called it pop or coke, but apparently that's a thing up around Maine or Vermont.

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
09-25-2013, 05:56 AM
I couldn't figure out why it was so quiet. Then I realized, after a lifetime in the south, that when winter arrived everywhere else, the birds were gone. I'd always lived where they migrated to, so there were always birds.

Having to drive in snow, of course.

Not being able to work in my garden in January, February, March, April, or sometimes even May.

Maggie Maxwell
09-25-2013, 05:57 AM
Agree on the absence of Sweet Tea! Most weird to me is the dialect and use of words like Pop for soda, or various forms of you guys instead of y’all. Oh yea, and winter. Here in Charleston SC winter begins and ends around February. Cold aint funny y’all!

Oh man, yeah, Southern winters. I've never been lucky enough to be in the North in winter, but I've seen the pictures and heard the stories. I moved to NC almost 10 years ago and I've seen only one really good snowfall. Most years we've been lucky to get an inch total that stuck to the ground.

slhuang
09-25-2013, 06:48 AM
I had a friend in college in MA who was from TN. One of the things she struggled with was the different expectations in social interaction. For instance, one time she wanted to get rid of a guy who was hanging out in her room, so she said she was "really rude," but he didn't take the hint. When we pressed her, it turned out her version of really rude was to smile and nod and every so often laugh and maybe ask him a question. We pointed out to her that in the Northeast that counts as being encouraging, not hinting someone should leave. She was quite resistant to that idea!

She also refused to believe her accent was any different from anyone else's. ;)

Williebee
09-25-2013, 06:50 AM
When you're down south and order a "coke" they ask what kind.

Jehhillenberg
09-25-2013, 07:35 AM
Hearing "pop" for soda or soft drink. :D

Nivarion
09-25-2013, 07:41 AM
The thing about ordering a coke and being asked what kind is seconded. As is the fact that southerners will greet strangers as they pass them finding the lack of greetings odd in the north.

Southerners in my experience also find the phrase "government solutions" said positive light to be unusual. The south's mistrust of government goes back to the beginning (1600's) and they find "Government" and "Solutions" to have different and incompatible definitions.

Most southerners live in a rural area with very little police presence, they therefore have a very open philosophy about guns and their use, and find anti gun philosophy to be very out of place. (the north being generally more anti-gun)

depending of the parts involved, northerners talk too fast.

and that's about all I can think of for now.

askcb
09-25-2013, 08:28 AM
I grew up in Alaska and moved to SC, the opposite of what you want, haha, but the first thing that struck me was how different the trees are down south. Even the pines are a completely different variety. Also, the noise like someone else mentioned. No cicadas, no constant buzzing sound. Also the suffocating humidity. North tends to be dry.

Medievalist
09-25-2013, 08:28 AM
The North, by which I'm specifically referring to New England, tends to not make eye contact with strangers; it's rude.

Also, they may omit the basic courtesies of please and thank you and how are you and lovely weather in commercial transactions.

It's not so much being rude, as a devotion to being non-intrusive is considered a virtue.

Humor is often laconic. Litotes is a way of life, possibly a religious ritual.

But they will plow your driveway for you, without expecting anything in return, ever.

The dialect differences are extreme, not only with respect to North vs. South, but Northern state vs. Northern state.

askcb
09-25-2013, 08:29 AM
Also, and maybe it was just the people I knew, but I was called Miss Kaylyn by my friends kids and kids' friends. Up north they use Mrs. so-and-so instead

untechioux
09-25-2013, 09:34 AM
"Pop" for soda is a Midwest/Plains states thing, not Northeast.

Make sure your MC packs a real winter coat. My aunt from Tennessee showed up here at Christmas time with a, well, windbreaker.

Seconding the iced tea thing: In the South, iced tea means sweet. Up north, unsweetened. Unless it says "sweet tea". Can't speak for other parts of the country, though, but I suspect that everywhere besides the South iced tea comes unsweetened.

Life in the Northeast is generally "faster" - people walk faster, people have a more rushed demeanor: gotta get to work, gotta get this done. One could make this comparison with East Coast vs West Coast, too. Doesn't mean you actually have somewhere to go - it just seems like it, in comparison.

Southern hospitality - when it's present - is a real thing. That does not mean we Northerners are rude. We're just in a hurry. :)

But as long the MC packs warm winter clothes s/he'll be fine. It's not a different country, after all. We all speak American.

Oh, if the MC is church-going, s/he may remark upon not seeing a church every 100 feet, like in the Bible belt.

(Spoken as a Southerner/Northerner)

Medievalist
09-25-2013, 09:53 AM
"Pop" for soda is a Midwest/Plains states thing, not Northeast.

No, no really, it's not. It's a regional thing, right down to the level of county line. This is documented; see Hans Kurath, for a start. It is used in New England.

Also: in New England, in most areas, that would be so-dar.

And my name is Lee-sir.

blacbird
09-25-2013, 10:36 AM
Lutefisk.

(This, from a Norse northerner, raised in northern Norse country, GarrisonKeillorville. It's weird to me, too. If you don't know what it is, groooogle. Then again . . . maybe you'll be happier if you don't.)

caw

cornflake
09-25-2013, 10:36 AM
My point.

blacbird
09-25-2013, 10:41 AM
Actually, I think that response to the waitress was both unfunny and rude, and not at all associated with regional differences in humor (which do exist). It wasn't designed to entertain the waitress, it was designed to entertain the utterer at the expense of the waitress. Ha ha.

"It was just a joke" is the lamest excuse for offending somebody I can think of.

Perhaps this is an indication of another regional difference, between the northeast and the north-central approaches toward humor. Us north-centralers often get accused of being "too polite".

caw

Rina Evans
09-25-2013, 10:54 AM
Oops, I thought it was funny. I use that kind of language often, and everyone seems to get it and reply in the same manner. I immediately chuckled when I read it - if I wanted to spare someone's feelings I wouldn't say I choked it down to spare their feelings right away, would I? :)

Chasing the Horizon
09-25-2013, 11:15 AM
Oops, I thought it was funny. I use that kind of language often, and everyone seems to get it and reply in the same manner. I immediately chuckled when I read it - if I wanted to spare someone's feelings I wouldn't say I choked it down to spare their feelings right away, would I? :)
It is funny. It's not at the expense of anyone's feelings. I love it when sarcasm like that is directed at me in real life, because it gives the opening for a sarcastic come-back.

Yes, I live in the northeast.

ETA: And cornflake edited her post while I was screwing with iTunes and replying, so now my post makes no sense. Great.

snafu1056
09-25-2013, 11:41 AM
As a Yankee I do notice that southerners are just nicer in general to strangers, so I'm sure southerners notice the opposite.

blacbird
09-25-2013, 11:54 AM
It is funny. It's not at the expense of anyone's feelings.

The perpetrator of the "joke" doesn't have the right to determine how the person who is the object of the "joke" should respond. It's one thing to make a sarcastic joke to someone you know, another entirely to make it to a stranger, who may be stressed or otherwise not in a position to understand the intended nuance. I've witnessed plenty of situations in restaurants where vile abusive customers said exactly the kind of thing you relate as meant in jest, only in dead and vicious earnest. And I'd bet my house that most restaurant servers have encountered such comments more than once, with no "joke" involved.

IT WASN'T FUNNY to the server.

caw

Cath
09-25-2013, 01:26 PM
Okay, let's not make this about a post that was deleted.

Humor is subjective. What one person finds hilarious can be highly offensive or upsetting to another. It's one of the myriad things that makes us individuals. Please, let's move away from criticising one of our fellow members.

Cathy C
09-25-2013, 03:23 PM
Back on topic:

I'm a northerner who moved to the South, so I see things backwards--in that I'm told how strange some of the things I do/say are. A few that a Southerner would immediately notice:

1. Mayonnaise. It's not automatically served on or with every sandwich. In fact, a lot of sandwiches in restaurants/delis may have the bread buttered! :eek: I detest mayonnaise, so this was a disgusting surprise for me. I mean, EVERY sandwich? Hamburgers, chicken, even BBQ? Ugh. I grew up with butter on bread, or at least ketchup or mustard.

2. Don't want to know. Someone already touched on this above, but the lack of interest in the lives of neighbors and co-workers. In fact, I recently heard of one southerner who was moving back south for the sole reason that nobody where she lived in Chicago wanted to know about her life story, and wouldn't reveal theirs in return. She felt utterly alone, despite being surrounded by a million people.

3. Bless you. I didn't know anyone where I grew up that offered a blessing at every sneeze or cough. But in the South, it's considered rude not to bless every involuntary noise another person utters in hearing range, whether or not you know the person.

4. Oops. Don't let me keep you. This is an actual standard apology in the north in a public place when one person stops another to talk and talks more than a few minutes. It's considered rude for the speaker to keep a person occupied too long and interrupt their plans. In the South, the reverse seems to be true and it's rude for the listener not to remain talking for as long as the speaker desires. A person in the south dreads going to the mall if they're in a hurry because they MUST speak to whoever stops them. A person in the north gives a cheery wave as they walk right by you and might say, "Call me later," upon a stated desire to talk.

5. Bless His/Her Heart. People from the North will see this not as a polite or warm/fuzzy comment, but as a prelude to some horrible insult or an excuse afterward for being catty/rude. For example: "Oh, bless his heart, he's just not very bright, is he?" Or, "Can you believe she wore that dress to a party like this? Bless her heart." It will be noticed and mentioned as being rude in the north.

6. Silence. People at northern jobs might go a full workday without saying a word that's not work related. A lot of people actually enjoy silence without constant conversation. In fact, at some jobs, "chatting" about kids, family and last night's high school football game, or listening to country/western music at your desk, isn't allowed at all during work hours.

I can think of plenty more, like naming conventions of children, but these will do for now.

King Neptune
09-25-2013, 04:28 PM
Back on topic:

I'm a northerner who moved to the South, so I see things backwards--in that I'm told how strange some of the things I do/say are. A few that a Southerner would immediately notice:

I'm a Northerner who avoids the South, but I agree with much of what you wrote.


1. Mayonnaise. It's not automatically served on or with every sandwich. In fact, a lot of sandwiches in restaurants/delis may have the bread buttered! :eek: I detest mayonnaise, so this was a disgusting surprise for me. I mean, EVERY sandwich? Hamburgers, chicken, even BBQ? Ugh. I grew up with butter on bread, or at least ketchup or mustard.

This can be a problem throughout the country. I am careful to say, "Hold the mayo, wherever I am, North, Sout, East, or West."


2. Don't want to know. Someone already touched on this above, but the lack of interest in the lives of neighbors and co-workers. In fact, I recently heard of one southerner who was moving back south for the sole reason that nobody where she lived in Chicago wanted to know about her life story, and wouldn't reveal theirs in return. She felt utterly alone, despite being surrounded by a million people.

Yes, nosy people are another problem that isn't ;imited by region. Here in the North there are people who seem offended that I reply to, "How are you?" with "I don't know either."


3. Bless you. I didn't know anyone where I grew up that offered a blessing at every sneeze or cough. But in the South, it's considered rude not to bless every involuntary noise another person utters in hearing range, whether or not you know the person.

This is a recent thing. It used to be that people would give some blessing with every sneeze, but it has become less common recently. I don't know why, but apparently Southerners are behind the times on this.


4. Oops. Don't let me keep you. This is an actual standard apology in the north in a public place when one person stops another to talk and talks more than a few minutes. It's considered rude for the speaker to keep a person occupied too long and interrupt their plans. In the South, the reverse seems to be true and it's rude for the listener not to remain talking for as long as the speaker desires. A person in the south dreads going to the mall if they're in a hurry because they MUST speak to whoever stops them. A person in the north gives a cheery wave as they walk right by you and might say, "Call me later," upon a stated desire to talk.

I think this is more individual, because I consider it the responsibility of whoever has something better to do to excuse himself.


5. Bless His/Her Heart. People from the North will see this not as a polite or warm/fuzzy comment, but as a prelude to some horrible insult or an excuse afterward for being catty/rude. For example: "Oh, bless his heart, he's just not very bright, is he?" Or, "Can you believe she wore that dress to a party like this? Bless her heart." It will be noticed and mentioned as being rude in the north.

I think this is another individual matter. I have heard that expression used both ways.


6. Silence. People at northern jobs might go a full workday without saying a word that's not work related. A lot of people actually enjoy silence without constant conversation. In fact, at some jobs, "chatting" about kids, family and last night's high school football game, or listening to country/western music at your desk, isn't allowed at all during work hours.

Yes, quiet is one advantage that the North might have.


I have known lifelong Northerners who could have been taken as Southerners in speech and manners, and I have met some Southerners who would fool most Northerners. But few Southerners can take the coolth of a decent Winter, while Northerners can, and that is a characteristic that even separates lifelong residents of the North.

WeaselFire
09-25-2013, 04:35 PM
Besides sweet tea, which in the South is just tea, Northerners have a funny idea of what bacon is supposed to taste like. Or most pork for that matter. And 'cue (barbecue for the forsaken Yankees...). But y'all got nice pizza. And bagels. And apples.

Besides, how can you choose Utica Club over a PBR? And no NASCAR? Don't get me started about the lack of guns, religion or respect for your elders. Or swamp buggies, gator huntin' and well-tanned cuties in Daisy Dukes.

And what's with all the pocket dogs? Hounds are supposed to be big and lazy, not fit in a designer purse. Little furry ankle biters would get beat up by a 'coon. And don't you guys realize that water is only supposed to be a solid when it's floatin' in your sweet tea?

Jeff

asroc
09-25-2013, 05:12 PM
Hearing "pop" for soda or soft drink. :D

Not in Massachusetts. It’s "soda" or, mostly from the older generation, "tonic."


Lutefisk.

(This, from a Norse northerner, raised in northern Norse country, GarrisonKeillorville. It's weird to me, too. If you don't know what it is, groooogle. Then again . . . maybe you'll be happier if you don't.)

caw

You won't find that in MA either (phew.) But lots of other seafood.

I'm a born-and-bred Masshole yankee, but one of my coworkers is originally from Georgia. Things he has noticed/complained about over the years:


Every second building is a Dunkin Donuts.
Rotaries (traffic circles). Common in MA, unheard of everywhere else.
Politics and sports are serious business. Do not take the Sox's name in vein.
If you ask a local to say: "Park the car in Harvard Yard," your body will never be found.
Real seasons. Winter snow, summer heat, colorful foliage in the fall. Complaining about the weather is always appropriate, though.
People appearing cold, brusk and unapproachable. But once we're friends, we really mean it.

mrsmig
09-25-2013, 07:01 PM
1) Being regarded as an ignorant hick because of your accent.

2) Bacon with all the sweetness fried out of it - all that's left is a hard salty chip.

3) No grits. No okra. No fried green tomatoes.

4) No honeysuckle. I'm not talking about that Japanese invasive stuff, I'm talking about real honeysuckle that smells so good it makes you want to lick the air.

5) You can't get a decent biscuit. Anywhere.

6) Haughty waitstaff. It doesn't happen in the South. It. Does. Not. Happen. (Well, maybe in Atlanta.)

7) No real blues. I guess there's something called Chicago Blues, but it's not real blues.

Saanen
09-25-2013, 07:06 PM
I'm southern (currently live in East Tennessee where I grew up) but I lived in Pennsylvania for just under two years. I know it's not very far north compared to Massachusetts, but it felt like a foreign country to me.

I second everyone who mentioned winters. I was only in PA for one winter (I moved home before the next one!) but I was absolutely miserable. I couldn't warm up no matter what I did. That January the temperature didn't get above 10oF for the entire month, night or day, and I truly thought I was going to die. It didn't help that I was living in a huge old drafty house and didn't own a real coat (and couldn't afford a good one). Then in the summer I never felt really hot. Every time it would warm up a cold front would come through and cool things down. It felt like I went from April to September September September September September. :) I like my very hot, very humid southern summers, thank you.

I don't have much of a southern accent, but I got very sensitive about how I spoke up north. I didn't understand some terms that were common (didn't know what a berm was, or pierogies, for instance) and people didn't always understand me.

My next door neighbors were very nice but reserved--I loaned them my lawnmower once when theirs was broken, and after that their eldest son mowed my lawn the ENTIRE summer for me--didn't even ask, just did it. I made them cookies because I didn't know how to thank them otherwise.

I found a lot of my coworkers abrasive or downright rude. I could tell it wasn't intentional, it was just how they were, but it was off-putting and I didn't make any close friends. All in all, I was glad to come home--but my brother and his family moved up there over 15 years ago and love it, so it's all subjective.

(Oh, and the food was awful. Cornbread with SUGAR in it, ugh!)

King Neptune
09-25-2013, 07:19 PM
I second everyone who mentioned winters. I was only in PA for one winter (I moved home before the next one!) but I was absolutely miserable. I couldn't warm up no matter what I did. That January the temperature didn't get above 10oF for the entire month, night or day, and I truly thought I was going to die. It didn't help that I was living in a huge old drafty house and didn't own a real coat (and couldn't afford a good one). Then in the summer I never felt really hot. Every time it would warm up a cold front would come through and cool things down. It felt like I went from April to September September September September September. :) I like my very hot, very humid southern summers, thank you.

Be glad that is wasn't a cold Winter.


I don't have much of a southern accent, but I got very sensitive about how I spoke up north. I didn't understand some terms that were common (didn't know what a berm was, or pierogies, for instance) and people didn't always understand me.

At least you lived in an area with good food. I have found that speech patterns are very spotty. I knew a guy from Indiana who claimed that he could only understand 85% of what I said, because he thought I had some strange accent. He sounded the same as people from my area, except for a few words that he pronounced poorly, so I figure he had poor hearing. Some people have very little ability to understand anything not said as they think it should be. My mother, who was a professional in linguistics couldn't figure out many Southern expressions.

Maggie Maxwell
09-25-2013, 07:22 PM
Not in Massachusetts. It’s "soda" or, mostly from the older generation, "tonic."



You won't find that in MA either (phew.) But lots of other seafood.

I'm a born-and-bred Masshole yankee, but one of my coworkers is originally from Georgia. Things he has noticed/complained about over the years:


Every second building is a Dunkin Donuts.
Rotaries (traffic circles). Common in MA, unheard of everywhere else.
Politics and sports are serious business. Do not take the Sox's name in vein.
If you ask a local to say: "Park the car in Harvard Yard," your body will never be found.
Real seasons. Winter snow, summer heat, colorful foliage in the fall. Complaining about the weather is always appropriate, though.
People appearing cold, brusk and unapproachable. But once we're friends, we really mean it.


1) Who the heck complains about Dunkin Donuts?
2) I have a traffic circle outside my office window. I can see a One Way sign and an arrow curved to the right from where I am seated. Every single day, I see at least half a dozen people going left on it because the exit they need is closer than going all the way around. I'm amazed I haven't seen an accident, but I have heard a LOT of honking when people get stuck by others going the wrong direction.

And from Weaselfire's comment, barbeque. Southerners can get protective of their barbeque. Heck, the standard changes based on the state, and God help you if someone's expecting vinegar based and gets tomato based or vice versa.

I've also heard the argument of barbeque" versus "cookout". In the south, Barbeque is a type of food while a cookout is burgers and hot dogs on the grill. I think in the north, though, barbeque is "meat on grill" and type of food. So a southerner invited to a northern barbeque will be disappointed to discover themselves at a cookout.

Lavern08
09-25-2013, 07:32 PM
Not so much weird, but definitely culture shock:



The long, cold winters
The seemingly rude behavior of waitstaff, department store associates, and people in general
No grits, okra, sweet tea, biscuits, country ham and Texas Pete hot sauce
Referring to what we call a cookout (grilling food outdoors) as "barbecue"
People who bring "store bought" dessert to potlucks
Folks who condescend to us as though we don't have libraries, television, internet access, or decent schools/restaurants/shopping in the South
The general assumption that Southerners are backwards, ignorant, shy, and naive

asroc
09-25-2013, 07:49 PM
1) Who the heck complains about Dunkin Donuts?


This guy from Georgia. Although that was more of an observation than a complaint. He leaves about half his paycheck there just like the rest of us.

King Neptune
09-25-2013, 08:02 PM
1) Who the heck complains about Dunkin Donuts?

I do not like Dunkin Donuts, and I complain about it when convenient. It used to be a very good donut and coffee place, but Allied Domecq PLC bought it and stopped making fresh donuts. Now DD has fair coffee, fair bagels, and donuts that are almost edible.

stumblebum
09-25-2013, 11:05 PM
If it's rural Tennessee your character is from, he/she will definitely notice the lack of tobacco use; won't get asked the 'smokin' or non' question when they step into a restaurant, see men and old ladies with dip in their gums, or the familiar stains some men rub into the thighs of their jeans when there isn't a convenient place to spit.

Also, I'm not sure what they call it up there, but down here it's a Jiffy. Not a convenience store, not a corner store; you're goin' to the Jiffy. Sometimes, in some places, you can sub the 7-11.

Funny but true story: I had a friend from Jersey. The first time he was on the phone with his friends from Jersey and called it the Jiffy, they hung up on him.
Also true: He once asked me: What's a grit?

Some rural counties in Tennessee and other parts of the dirty south are almost entirely white. While they will no longer lynch a 'colored fella' (yes, that term is still used quite frequently in my old neighborhood), they will NOT make eye contact with someone of another race (and not just black). At the same time, a lot of southern folk don't give a rat's ass what color you are. If you're cool, you're cool.
My immediately family falls into the latter category, my extended, for the most part, the former.

Meth use is huge.

We take our booze very seriously, but a lot of counties are dry. Again, if your MC grew up in the sticks, he is used to driving to the county line to get his drank. Yes, drank.
Also, there is a Jiffy right across the border of every dry county. Probably one across the street as well.

If it's a male, he has, at least once in his life, been jigged by a catfish. It might seem strange that this isn't a right of passage for all American males.

He thinks 30k a year is good money.

He may drink Cheerwine.

He has at least one relative who fought in the civil war, if his family goes back that far.

Everything closes on Sunday.

I'm sure I'm missing some things, but that's a good start.

Trebor1415
09-25-2013, 11:28 PM
Be aware that Mass and the Northeast are, in some ways, almost as different from the Midwest as they are from the South.

Just saying to make sure when you talk about "how things are different up north" that you ensure the differences relate to Mass. specifically and not to midwestern "northern things."

Saanen
09-25-2013, 11:31 PM
Thought of something else. I don't know about all areas up north, but I was astounded at how close together the houses were in PA and how one town ran into another. Things are much more spread out over much of the south (not counting large cities, of course). Even modest, older houses in towns have good-sized yards. The house I live in now was built in the 1930s and is about 850 square feet, but my yard is more than a third of an acre. The house I lived in in PA was built in the 1910s, was three stories tall with a full basement--a gorgeous house--but with a yard much smaller than the one I've got now. That seemed to be common everywhere I went.

Lilacs were EVERYWHERE. They don't grow very well in the south so I was amazed to see so many. Down here we have dogwoods, but I do love the smell of lilacs. No kudzu up north (not that I missed that).

The roads up north are terrible. They have those weird folding reflectors stuck to some of the roads instead of having them set into the blacktop like down here--because the ones set in blacktop tend to pop out when the snowplows come through.

stumblebum, I've never heard of people calling a convenience store a Jiffy. Maybe it's a west or middle Tennessee thing? We might say we've got to run down to the Rocky Top (a common chain here), but more likely these days we'd say we have to go to the Walmart.

holy_shiitake
09-26-2013, 12:03 AM
Y'all are giving me a TON of good stuff. As a Northerner-Southerner-Northerner, I too miss good grits, gravy, cookout (both the NC chain restaurant and the hot dogs on the grill) good NC barbecue, Cheerwine and The Walmart (or The Target). See also: Waffe House. And the chatting! All the "how's your mama now?" stuff. But I did miss my bagels and "bacon egg and cheese on hard rolls" down there. Y'all might have Brueger's, but that ain't a dirty-water New Yawk bagel. And yes, the first time my MC sees real snow, she's gonna need a fainting sofa.

cornflake
09-26-2013, 12:12 AM
Y'all are giving me a TON of good stuff. As a Northerner-Southerner-Northerner, I too miss good grits, gravy, cookout (both the NC chain restaurant and the hot dogs on the grill) good NC barbecue, Cheerwine and The Walmart (or The Target). See also: Waffe House. And the chatting! All the "how's your mama now?" stuff. But I did miss my bagels and "bacon egg and cheese on hard rolls" down there. Y'all might have Brueger's, but that ain't a dirty-water New Yawk bagel. And yes, the first time my MC sees real snow, she's gonna need a fainting sofa.

This made me laugh, sorry. There are 'dirty-water 'dogs,' which are the hotdogs sold by street vendors, so called because they spend all day vaguely poaching in a vat of questionable water in the cart.

There are bagels, which are properly made by boiling first. Many think local water makes a difference in the taste of bread products - hence NY bagels and pizza crust and SF sourdough are all things.

However, there's no such thing as a 'dirty-water bagel.' Bagels are boiled in clean water in bakeries as part of the production process. New York bagels, yes, though bagels in NY are just bagels. Dirty water dogs, yes, but not a mix. :)

holy_shiitake
09-26-2013, 12:12 AM
Also, two major cultural failings of the North: Y'all don't have Chick-Fil-A, and y'all don't have Belk's.

cornflake
09-26-2013, 12:18 AM
Also, two major cultural failings of the North: Y'all don't have Chick-Fil-A, and y'all don't have Belk's.

I don't know what Belk's is but isn't there Chick-whatever hanging around? I vaguely recall Boston-area students protesting it when they had the same-sex marriage kerfuffle.

mrsmig
09-26-2013, 12:33 AM
Belk's is a department store (not unlike a Bon-Ton or Dillard's). Chick-Fil-A, which is famous for its pressure-cooker chicken sandwiches (which can be prepared as quickly as a hamburger), began in Atlanta, and while it's still primarily a southern chain, has expanded into other regions of the U.S.

Another Southern fast food chain is Krystal Burger, which is akin to White Castle.

ironmikezero
09-26-2013, 01:02 AM
Not to open a can of worms, but... Driving habits can be quite different (not just weather related). In the South, that slow pick-up with the farm tag is pretty likely to pull over and ride along the shoulder to let faster following traffic pass. Meanwhile, the other pick-up operator coming from the opposite direction waved and nodded just to be neighborly - the two drivers probably don't know one another.

Road rage is rare - everybody tends to be very familiar with firearms.

Exceeding the posted speed limit by 10% tends to be overlooked - assuming some degree of skill is demonstrated (NASCAR is almost a religion). But one should be wary of small towns in need of revenue enhancement. Of course that advice may hold true everywhere...

Medievalist
09-26-2013, 01:12 AM
Also, two major cultural failings of the North: Y'all don't have Chick-Fil-A, and y'all don't have Belk's.


Waffle House is pretty rare too.

Medievalist
09-26-2013, 01:19 AM
Cornbread made with more white flour than corn meal, and substantial sugar fairly common in New England.

Molasses as a flavoring in the south vs. maple syrup in New England

Country ham and country bacon are southern things that are hard to obtain in New England

Black eyed peas with rice isn't very common in New England. My mom would cook hoppin' john fairly often, and we often had guests who had never had black eyed peas with or without rice.

MostlyBecca
09-26-2013, 01:29 AM
I just recently moved to Ohio from North Carolina where I lived my whole life. It's definitely an adjustment, although not as much as I imagine it is in more northeastern states.

The pop vs soda thing is the most obvious. Some people in the south like to call the trunk of the car the "boot." I don't and a lot of southerners don't. That one varies widely. I'm sure there are a lot more I can't think of at the moment.

There are a lot of pronunciation differences: caramel, pecan, cement.

The big thing that I still can't get used to is how people here say "The lawn needs watered" or "The sink needs fixed." I've commented on it and no one seems to think it's grammatically incorrect. I mean, maybe it's not but it sure sounds that way to me. (Anyone know for certain?) That one may also be an Ohio thing and not a northern thing. I've seen people from Michigan comment on it too and they're nearby.

Oh, pine trees here are bizarre. When I first got here I kept wondering what all the short, fat trees were that looked sort of like christmas trees. I was told they were pine trees. Yeahhhh, pine trees where I come from are very tall and very skinny. The exact opposite of the weird abominations they have here.

When you order tea in the south, it comes sweet and cold. You don't even have to specify sweet tea. If you want sweet tea here, you can order it, but you have to be very specific and even then they might not have it unless you're eating at a chain of some kind that has a presence in the south.

And don't get me started on how completely not-barbecue-like the barbecue here is. Even when they claim it's North Carolina barbecue... it never is. Not even close.

benbradley
09-26-2013, 01:54 AM
Waffle House is pretty rare too.
There are no Krystals up north either, but I've heard White Castle is the equivalent. I saw a White Castle on Long Island, but I was afraid to go in it to find out.

benbradley
09-26-2013, 02:01 AM
I just recently moved to Ohio from North Carolina where I lived my whole life. It's definitely an adjustment, although not as much as I imagine it is in more northeastern states.

The pop vs soda thing is the most obvious. Some people in the south like to call the trunk of the car the "boot." I don't and a lot of southerners don't. That one varies widely. I'm sure there are a lot more I can't think of at the moment.

There are a lot of pronunciation differences: caramel, pecan, cement.

The big thing that I still can't get used to is how people here say "The lawn needs watered" or "The sink needs fixed." I've commented on it and no one seems to think it's grammatically incorrect. I mean, maybe it's not but it sure sounds that way to me. (Anyone know for certain?) That one may also be an Ohio thing and not a northern thing. I've seen people from Michigan comment on it too and they're nearby.
I vaguely recall some essay on that, saying it's indeed not grammatical, but we gotta have ways of "distinguishing" ourselfs from Northerners.. :D

And don't get me started on how completely not-barbecue-like the barbecue here is. Even when they claim it's North Carolina barbecue... it never is. Not even close.
Uh-oh, the B word. Thread Lock in 3... 2...

asroc
09-26-2013, 02:06 AM
I don't know what Belk's is but isn't there Chick-whatever hanging around? I vaguely recall Boston-area students protesting it when they had the same-sex marriage kerfuffle.


Yeah, that was about a Chick-fil-A potentially setting up in Boston. Menino famously told them that he wouldn't let them set up shop because Boston is about freedom and supports gay marriage. There aren't any in the Boston area that I'm aware of, but I can't speak for the rest of MA.





Also, I'm not sure what they call it up there, but down here it's a Jiffy. Not a convenience store, not a corner store; you're goin' to the Jiffy. Sometimes, in some places, you can sub the 7-11.



That's a spa. A 7-11 is not a spa, though.


Be aware that Mass and the Northeast are, in some ways, almost as different from the Midwest as they are from the South.

Just saying to make sure when you talk about "how things are different up north" that you ensure the differences relate to Mass. specifically and not to midwestern "northern things."

Yep, that's an important distinction. It might also be important to know where in Massachusetts the character is moving to. She'll have a different experience at Boston University than at Mount Holyoke.

MostlyBecca
09-26-2013, 02:16 AM
Uh-oh, the B word. Thread Lock in 3... 2...It had to be said!

I don't even mind it if they call it barbecue and it's nothing like the barbecue I'm used to. Afterall, SC barbecue is already very different from NC barbecue. But actually spelling it out on a menu as "North Carolina Pulled Pork" (none of us would call it that for one thing) and the only vinegar it contains is on the bun when you get it in a sandwich?! :Wha:

King Neptune
09-26-2013, 03:06 AM
The big thing that I still can't get used to is how people here say "The lawn needs watered" or "The sink needs fixed." I've commented on it and no one seems to think it's grammatically incorrect. I mean, maybe it's not but it sure sounds that way to me. (Anyone know for certain?) That one may also be an Ohio thing and not a northern thing. I've seen people from Michigan comment on it too and they're nearby.


There are some odd accents in the North Central region, and there has also been a vowel shift within the last few decades.
Northern Cities Vowel Shift (scroll down)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_English_regional_phonology#The_Nort hern_Cities_Vowel_Shift

jaksen
09-26-2013, 04:42 AM
You can always make generalizations about any area. When I was a child, I remember my parents and grandparents saying that some day the whole country would talk the same, use all the same expressions, eat the same foods, and that the entire nation was (sadly) becoming homogenized.

That was over forty years ago and it ain't happened yet.

I am a MA resident, and am currently on Cape Cod. We say soda (pronounced so-duh) though the older folks still say tonic. When I take a walk everyone says hello, but truthfully, I know few of my neighbors, except to say Hi to them. But people will go out of their way if you have a need.

I used to walk my son (autistic/retarded) in a large stroller, but year after year it got in worse and worse shape. (It would accommodate up to 120 pounds and he was pushing 130.) A woman driving by stopped me and asked where I lived and said she had a nice walking wheelchair she'd like to give me. I told her my name and address, and two days later an expensive wheelchair/stroller was sitting in my old garage. Worth about $2,000. I never got her name or address, though I waited outside all day for her to bring it. (She must have scooted it into my garage when I was in the house.) I suppose that kind of generosity can be found anywhere in the US, or at least I'd like to think so.

After our Feb. blizzard this year, neighbors who I only knew by their first name were in my yard helping to cut down and remove over thirty trees which had fallen over or lost huge branches. The stuff was literally everywhere, and several branches just missed our house. Again, the kind of neighborly helpfulness I hope is more common than not no matter what area of the country you live in.

We had friends from down South visit us a few years ago. They did think Southerners were more outgoing/friendly than Northerners, and they marveled at all the woods up here. (They imagined MA as a 'rocky' kind of place.) Where I live it's fairly flat, coastal plain, so they missed the hilly terrain they were used to. They used to stand in our yard and talk to our neighbors - people we usually just say hi to now and then. They learned more about our neighbors in a week's visit than I had in thirty years of living next to them.

Mark Moore
09-26-2013, 05:44 AM
I'm a northerner. I'm originally from Chicago but moved down to Florida when I was 7. I've been here for 27 years now.

I want to go back up north (but I can't afford to).

The observations that northerners avoid eye contact with strangers and consider unintrusiveness a virtue are very appealing to me.

In general, when I'm working at my retail job, I rarely make eye contact with the customers, and I always greet them with a simple "Hello", NEVER "How are you?", "How's it goin'?", or "What's goin' on?". The way that I see it, I don't know what's going on in these people's lives; for all that I know, their relative, friend, or pet recently died, and the LAST thing that they want to hear is "How are you?" (I've had to put up with numerous "How are you?"s on days that a pet died, and I've wanted to punch each of these intrusive people in the face.)

Besides, it's NONE OF MY BUSINESS how these complete strangers are.

Of course, being in the south, I often get accused of being "rude" or "not very friendly" when I ignore "How are you?", small talk, or any of the stupid, repetitive "jokes" that the customers hurl at me. Or they'll say something sarcastic like "That good, huh?" or "Good! Glad to hear it!"

I recently told a persistent customer that I'm not into small talk, to which she replied "Oh. *pause* Wanna talk about Syria?" I was like "Nope." That shut her up.

I instill my main characters with this "unintrusive" virtue, regardless of where they're from.

Russell Secord
09-26-2013, 06:06 AM
People do not want to stop and talk. It's not necessarily rude, but it seems that way when you're used to putting a claim on someone's time. It's simple courtesy to respond in kind.

Which brings me to the other point. Everything happens faster. Southerners are still in the Second Wave, an agrarian society. People aren't machines, it's counterproductive to treat them that way.

K.B. Parker
09-26-2013, 06:17 AM
Seriously, this entire thread just makes me miss North Carolina.

blacbird
09-26-2013, 10:54 AM
Some people in the south like to call the trunk of the car the "boot."

That's very much a Britishism. Likewise the hood is the "bonnet".


The big thing that I still can't get used to is how people here say "The lawn needs watered" or "The sink needs fixed."

I grew up in GarrisonKeillorCountry, northern Iowa/southern Minnesota, as a good little Norse boy, dontcha know, and that syntax is everyday speech, you betcha. As is starting ever third sentence with "So . . . "

The Coen brothers caught a lot of crap about their portrayal of the speech of Minnesotans in the movie Fargo. All my relatives talked exactly like that, and I probably got trained out of it by my decade-long sojourn into radio news broadcasting.

caw

Cathy C
09-26-2013, 02:07 PM
That's very much a Britishism. Likewise the hood is the "bonnet".



I grew up in GarrisonKeillorCountry, northern Iowa/southern Minnesota, as a good little Norse boy, dontcha know, and that syntax is everyday speech, you betcha. As is starting ever third sentence with "So . . . "

The Coen brothers caught a lot of crap about their portrayal of the speech of Minnesotans in the movie Fargo. All my relatives talked exactly like that, and I probably got trained out of it by my decade-long sojourn into radio news broadcasting.

caw

I also found myself nodding during Fargo and couldn't understand why reviewers were upset because all the people in the movie sounded just like my relatives in extreme northern Iowa (7 miles from the MN border). I'm also a good Norse girl and actually spoke Norwegian early in my life---I've since forgotten, but I still have a tendency to start sentences with "So..." :ROFL:

Don't get me started on barbecue...(shudder)

vagough
09-26-2013, 02:31 PM
The thing about ordering a coke and being asked what kind is seconded. As is the fact that southerners will greet strangers as they pass them finding the lack of greetings odd in the north.

Southerners in my experience also find the phrase "government solutions" said positive light to be unusual. The south's mistrust of government goes back to the beginning (1600's) and they find "Government" and "Solutions" to have different and incompatible definitions.

Most southerners live in a rural area with very little police presence, they therefore have a very open philosophy about guns and their use, and find anti gun philosophy to be very out of place. (the north being generally more anti-gun)

depending of the parts involved, northerners talk too fast.

and that's about all I can think of for now.

Actually, many, if not most, Southerners live in urban/suburban areas now. Cities there have grown, just as they have in other parts of the country. And there's a divide there, just as there is elsewhere, about guns.

Second the comment about Southerners greeting people in stores and shops. They'd do that almost automatically.

5thBananaSplit
09-26-2013, 02:39 PM
I'm not sure I buy the notion that you're doing someone a favor or being virtuous, somehow, by being rude to them. Maybe that's why I will never fit in outside of the South.

King Neptune
09-26-2013, 03:48 PM
You can always make generalizations about any area. When I was a child, I remember my parents and grandparents saying that some day the whole country would talk the same, use all the same expressions, eat the same foods, and that the entire nation was (sadly) becoming homogenized.

That was over forty years ago and it ain't happened yet.


If there are any people who travelled around the country much before WW II, then ask them about that. The regional differences were much greater pre-war. Post WW II people moved anywhere in the country and tried to fit in. The differences have been decreasing, and someday they differences will be gone, but that probably will take a few centuries, unless something happens to homogenize the country.

A similar thing happened in France. Before Napoleon French was spoken by about a third of the people. After 1815 French was spoken by about 86% of the French, and that is just one sign of homogenization.

cornflake
09-26-2013, 04:18 PM
I'm not sure I buy the notion that you're doing someone a favor or being virtuous, somehow, by being rude to them. Maybe that's why I will never fit in outside of the South.

From my perspective, it's not being rude; it's the opposite.

I've heard tons of people talk about how surprised they were by how friendly people in big cities like NY or Chicago were/are when they made a trip to the city and asked directions or even just stopped with a map out or what have you.

Go to the local market and you'll hear chitchat between customers and cashiers - who know each other after seeing one another often.

People are friendly and nice - friendly and nice enough not to be fakey conversational and with people they don't know, or friendly and nice enough not to make people feel they're rude if they don't want to stop and chat every time they see someone.

I find that sort of thing unnerving and rude. They often don't know the people they're saying that stuff to; they don't care about the answers. Just let people get on about their business without intruding or making them feel compelled to get into some conversation with someone they don't know. To me, that's nicer and less rude. All perspective I suppose.

jclarkdawe
09-26-2013, 05:20 PM
One of the fun differences between Maine and New Hampshire and the South was the use of the term "boy." In Maine and New Hampshire, you were a "boy" to anyone younger then them. This continued until you became forty to sixty, when you became a "young man." It didn't matter what color your skin was. Down South, a "boy" was someone Black and not a nice term.

This has tended to disappear, but not completely.

Pronouncing some words is difficult. I had a spelling teacher in fifth grade who came from Virginia. She wants us to spell "woof." Couldn't pronounce "wolf" clear enough for us to understand it.

Discussing New York City and Boston and northern rural Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont are entirely different cultures.

Driving in snow completely baffles southerners. But again, there is a difference in snow removal. Everybody in New Hampshire, Maine, and Vermont has a pick up with a plow, or at least it seems like it. We have the equipment to deal with winter. Even Massachusetts is far enough south that you can see a drop in the snow removal ability.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

wendymarlowe
09-26-2013, 06:17 PM
Grew up in eastern Wisconsin, went to college at Duke (in NC), now live in Alabama. A list of observations, in no particular order:

1) The bugs down here are evil. I don't like having cockroaches in my house! Up north, you don't get cockroaches in your house unless you're a really bad housekeeper, because the bugs can't live outdoors so they have to raise several generations in your house before you actually see them. Here, there are plenty of outdoor colonies, so even the most fastidious housekeeper will find bugs which wander indoors occasionally. Old houses are quite a bit worse, actually, because they tend to not be insulated as well (why bother?) - you can't get away with that kind of construction in colder regions.

2) Architecture - piggybacking off of that, buildings in the north tend to be squarer to help prevent heat loss. Here there are ton of one-story ranch houses, on slab foundations, often with a flattish roof. In Wisconsin you almost never saw that - houses would have a basement and a second story on a smaller footprint, with a steeper roof so snow can't accumulate too much and cause structural damage.

3) Kids don't get "snow days" at school here, they get "weather days." Which really confused me (what kind of weather could you possibly get off school for?) until I lived through my first hurricane season.

4) The south gets hurricanes. (I live eight hours from the coast and we still get pretty serious hurricane damage.)

5) On the other hand, school here gets cancelled if there's any accumulation of snow whatsoever (even just on the grass), or if there's snow in the air, or if there *might* be snow in the air somewhere in city limits, or if the clouds just look kinda threatening. In Wisconsin we got school cancelled if there was more than 12" accumulation in a 24-hour period or if it was below -40. I was the only kid in my class to have never ridden a school bus into the ditch. (I was at the end of the bus route and my school was the catch-all for the rural kids, but still . . .)

6) (and this STILL messes with me) - that white stuff in the ditches when driving through the country here isn't frost, it's cotton fluff from the harvest. Really messes with my brain to see that because my brain says "Cold, be careful of ice on the road" even when it's ninety degrees out!

7) First day at college at Duke (which draws students from all over the country) and you could absolutely tell who was from where. The New Yorkers were (sometimes literally) knocking over the southern students on the walkways. Like double their average walking speed. It evened out by the time we got to be seniors, but my husband - a native Alabamian - still gets on me sometimes about walking too fast for him to keep up. And he's got longer legs.

8) I hate hate *hate* being called "Miss Wendy" all the time. Where I grew up, adults were Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms Lastname, no exceptions. (Well, maybe a few exceptions, but that was pretty much only for "Mom's boyfriend" or the like.) Here adults are all Mr/Miss Firstname, regardless of marital status. Except for teachers, who go by last name, and pastors, who seem to go by "Pastor Firstname" most of the time.

9) This may be more specific to Wisconsin, but . . . there are black people down here! Stupid as it may sound, it still is weird to me. In Wisconsin, scutwork jobs (fast food, housekeeping, etc.) were all done by teenagers or whatnot, but pretty universally white because that's the demographic we had. Down here, economic minorities are GREATLY over-represented in minimum-wage jobs, both as teens and as adults. It made me really uncomfortable in college, because here I was surrounded by an artificially diverse student population but almost all the maintenance/gardening staff were hispanic men and all the housekeepers were black women. There's an economic divide in the north too, of course, but it's not quite so split along racial lines.

That said, my brother (white Wisconsin boy) married a girl he met at college (black Texan girl). The biggest cultural difference have been because she's Texan :-P

Little Anonymous Me
09-26-2013, 06:28 PM
Parts of the South is prone to torrential downpours and thunderstorms in the summer. My mother's coworker is from Ohio, and the woman thought the world was ending just because the thunder shook the windows and the rain flooded the streets. :Shrug: That's summer, ya'll.


It's also very common for people to refer to others as 'grown' instead of adults (She's grown! Her momma needs to leave her be!). Boy/Girl is used generically where I'm at, and it's very common to hear adults calling each other that.


Common Florida joke: the more South you go, the more North you get. I've met Miami natives who'd never had grits. (!!!!!)


The epic triple contraction ya'll're (you all are) is a normal part of speech.


It's very stiff to call someone Mr. Jones--your friends' parents are always Mr. Joe and Ms. Jane. Also, I find it very rude not to add 'ma'am' at the end of things if I don't know the person.


And you will be stoned if you call it an alligator. That is a gator. And it's no big thing to find them swimming in your backyard pond.

mrsmig
09-26-2013, 06:47 PM
You haven't lived in the south unless you know what a meat-and-three is. I live in Virginia but even that is too far north for a real meat-and-three. God, how I miss them.

itsmary
09-26-2013, 07:51 PM
I love this thread.

One thing I've noticed is people outside the South never say "y'all" quite the same as we do (when they do say it). It sounds more long and drawn out.

amrose
09-26-2013, 08:24 PM
Parts of the South is prone to torrential downpours and thunderstorms in the summer. My mother's coworker is from Ohio, and the woman thought the world was ending just because the thunder shook the windows and the rain flooded the streets. :Shrug: That's summer, ya'll.

It's also a good indication that it's about two or three PM.

During the summer if I see dark clouds gathering from my office window I know there's only a few hours of work left.

I heard someone from the north refer to a clap of thunder as a "thunder-boomer" once. Don't know if that's common.

Little Anonymous Me
09-26-2013, 09:40 PM
It's also a good indication that it's about two or three PM.

During the summer if I see dark clouds gathering from my office window I know there's only a few hours of work left.

I heard someone from the north refer to a clap of thunder as a "thunder-boomer" once. Don't know if that's common.



:roll: It was indeed circa 2, I think. My mother couldn't stop laughing all afternoon. ;)


Oh, another thing: many parts of the South have grass that's hard or prickly (like St. Augustine grass), and when I visited Pennsylvania, I couldn't believe my feet! The grass was so soft!


And we're insanely territorial about our universities--mine sells shirts with 'I bleed garnet and gold' printed on them, and our rival schools have similar shirts. I thought this was normal until someone remarked on it. (Is it not??)

Saanen
09-26-2013, 10:31 PM
Many years ago I worked in a book store with a guy from Austria, I think, or maybe Germany. He thought everyone in America (in this case, East Tennessee) was very fake because of all the "how are you" and "have a nice day" kind of exchanges with every customer. I tried to explain that it wasn't fake at all: not only is it considered the minimum acceptable politeness to ask someone who's serving you how they're doing and then wish them well, people genuinely do want to know. You don't have to give a stock "fine, thanks" reply if you don't want to. I can't tell you how many times I've talked with a cashier or somebody about what an awful day we've both had, etc., if there's not a line behind me.

My coworker just couldn't understand that no one was being fake or nosy. He wasn't a rude person at all, he just came from a different culture. I suspect a lot of northerners feel the same way. (And it doesn't help that some cashiers/servers/etc. from all over the country are now required to wish customers well out loud or get fired--and that is fake and too bad, but has nothing to do with southern traditions.)

MostlyBecca
09-26-2013, 10:32 PM
1) The bugs down here are evil. I don't like having cockroaches in my house! Up north, you don't get cockroaches in your house unless you're a really bad housekeeper, because the bugs can't live outdoors so they have to raise several generations in your house before you actually see them. Here, there are plenty of outdoor colonies, so even the most fastidious housekeeper will find bugs which wander indoors occasionally. Old houses are quite a bit worse, actually, because they tend to not be insulated as well (why bother?) - you can't get away with that kind of construction in colder regions.

Growing up I always heard northerners who visited the south say how much worse the bugs down south are, but then I moved north and discovered the silverfish.

Seriously, who named it that? That makes it sound majestic, which it is anything but. At least bugs in the south don't skitter around like they're hopped up on speed.

And earwigs... *shudder* makes me want to start wearing ear protection when I go to bed at night. Of course, I've only seen one since I've been here. But once was enough!

WeaselFire
09-26-2013, 10:38 PM
Biscuits and gravy. In MA, gravy is what we call spaghetti sauce. :)

MA has a funny thing about fish too. Fried fish up there is halibut instead of catfish. Fish here comes with hush puppies. Clams dont' exist, we slurp oysters. Lobster has claws in the Bay Colony, here in Florida they don't. And we suck mudbugs. I like your Chowdah' but you can't do a decent gumbo to save your life. Okra is not slimy in the South.

Northern corn is sweeter. And you feed it to cows and pigs, we feed them grass. And more grass. Brooks babble up north, in the south the streams meander quietly. But you ain't got love bugs and you don't use Vaseline on your car to keep them off it. You all seem to have light bulbs glowing under the hood all night though, must be to keep them warm or something.

Our leaves don't change. Although down here in Florida, a falling "leaf" will do $500 worth of damage if it hits your car. And "raking the lawn" means dragging a 20 foot, 45 pound frond to the curb. And our "acorns" will cause brain damage or crack a windshield. But tourists will buy them for a dollar.

You build with oak, we build with cypress. You have snow machines, we have jet skis. You have sleds, we have jon boats. You have enforcers named Guido, we have crackers named Bubba J. And Bubba is the legal name, the J. don't stand for nuthin'. 'Cept when Big Bubba is Bubba J's pop.

You have priests, we have preachers. You do a lot of kneeling, we don't do any dancin'. Except on Saturday night down by the river when the moonshine takes control. Friday night is for football. Hockey is a strange sport, ice dancing is for sissies. You have valleys, we have hollers. Though we spell them like hollows.

You outlawed the death penalty, we streamlined the process. You have Democrats, we don't mind them if they're polite. You wear trousers, we wear pants. Or jeans. Or overalls. And sometimes flannel, you did get that right.

Jeff

amrose
09-26-2013, 10:48 PM
Growing up I always heard northerners who visited the south say how much worse the bugs down south are, but then I moved north and discovered the silverfish.

Wait, what? We have silverfish in the South. They are all over frikkin' garages and attics. They ate the tissue that packed my Alivan's wand :(


Seriously, who named it that? That makes it sound majestic, which it is anything but. At least bugs in the south don't skitter around like they're hopped up on speed.

Except for the "palmetto bugs" so big we charge ours a percentage of the rent. And seriously, everyone GTFO with this palmetto bug junk! A roach is a roach is a roach. Don't care what the Orkin man says.


And earwigs... *shudder* makes me want to start wearing ear protection when I go to bed at night. Of course, I've only seen one since I've been here. But once was enough!

OMG, what?! :chair

Jim Riley
09-26-2013, 10:52 PM
To name a few: Southern hospitality, seasoning in our food, the Bible belt, Yes Ma'am & No Ma'am, fried cornbread, conservative politics for the most part, long hunting seasons, crawfish & alligators

MostlyBecca
09-26-2013, 11:13 PM
Wait, what? We have silverfish in the South. They are all over frikkin' garages and attics. They ate the tissue that packed my Alivan's wand :(
Oh god, I must have lived in a very fortunate part of the south. I'd never even heard of them until I moved here.



Except for the "palmetto bugs" so big we charge ours a percentage of the rent. And seriously, everyone GTFO with this palmetto bug junk! A roach is a roach is a roach. Don't care what the Orkin man says.

I think those are the same things they sometimes call waterbugs in NC. You know... the american cockroach, seriously just call it what it is. I don't mind them as long as they stay outside.



OMG, what?!

Okay, I don't actually think they crawl into peoples ears more often than any other bug, but um better safe than sorry I guess. Plus, they pinch. (And why call them that if there isn't a tiny grain of truth in there somewhere?)

Little Anonymous Me
09-26-2013, 11:27 PM
Except for the "palmetto bugs" so big we charge ours a percentage of the rent. And seriously, everyone GTFO with this palmetto bug junk! A roach is a roach is a roach. Don't care what the Orkin man says.


They actually are two different breeds (http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/urban/roaches/american_cockroach.htm), according to UF's bug department (http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in915). But I scream and holler the same for both. :tongue


And I found a silverfish in my apartment the other day. Killed that sucker dead! :guns:

King Neptune
09-26-2013, 11:30 PM
Biscuits and gravy. In MA, gravy is what we call spaghetti sauce. :)

That is true among Italians, but it is rarely used by others.


MA has a funny thing about fish too. Fried fish up there is halibut instead of catfish. Fish here comes with hush puppies. Clams dont' exist, we slurp oysters. Lobster has claws in the Bay Colony, here in Florida they don't. And we suck mudbugs. I like your Chowdah' but you can't do a decent gumbo to save your life. Okra is not slimy in the South.

Fried fish in New England should be cod or haddock, not halibut, but of course it is not catfish, because is not native to New England.


Northern corn is sweeter. And you feed it to cows and pigs, we feed them grass. And more grass. Brooks babble up north, in the south the streams meander quietly. But you ain't got love bugs and you don't use Vaseline on your car to keep them off it. You all seem to have light bulbs glowing under the hood all night though, must be to keep them warm or something.

Before the blessing of global warming it was common to use a block heater, but some people just used a light bulb.

amrose
09-26-2013, 11:52 PM
Oh god, I must have lived in a very fortunate part of the south. I'd never even heard of them until I moved here.

Yeah, you did. I'm ten minutes out from NOLA. We got 'em. And love bugs, and mosquitos and june bugs and flies and moths and doodle bugs and dragonflies and grasshoppers and ants and yellow jackets and brown recluses and TERMITE SWARMS!

GAH! WHY CAN'T I LEAVE?!

J/K I know why. It's the fried oyster po-boys and sweet fries.

amrose
09-26-2013, 11:57 PM
They actually are two different breeds (http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/urban/roaches/american_cockroach.htm), according to UF's bug department (http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in915). But I scream and holler the same for both. :tongue

Those websites made me itchy.

BardSkye
09-27-2013, 12:04 AM
This thread makes me want to visit the South at least once in my lifetime. If I ever get that wish and want to order hot black tea with milk and sugar in it, what do I ask for?

amrose
09-27-2013, 12:14 AM
"Hot tea and would you please bring milk with it."

I always have my tea with milk and sugar or honey. Sugar's usually on the table already, but if the server doesn't ask if you want milk or cream with it I always ask. I didn't realize Americans don't always have their tea this way until much later.

I warn you, though, if you come to LA the tea will likely be Lipton and it's like hot brown water. Unless you're somewhere fancy or at a hotel where they do a nice tea service. Go to Windsor Court for a nice high tea.

BardSkye
09-27-2013, 12:17 AM
Thank you. I could live with Lipton if I had to, though it's not my brand.

I'd really like to try REAL barbeque. (I'm from Canada.)

`Raine
09-27-2013, 02:07 AM
College football is a BIG thing here, especially in states further south (but I know some people from E TN who are very into it); school pride goes along with it. The same for college basketball in certain states - being a Duke fan in an area where UNC is popular can affect your social calendar during certain times of the year.

Religion is different. There are more churches in general and it's more socially acceptable to ask people where they go to church and invite strangers to your church (this seems to happen to me monthly, I don't think I look especially in need of saving). Also, most areas of the South are heavily Baptist & Methodist and many areas have lots of Pentecostals, compared to the North. There are relatively few Catholic churches (outside of Louisiana) and most of the parishes I've been to in NC are 1/2 or more Latino & Asian.

Funny North/South story - trying to explain to a friend from New Jersey what a collard was. Oh, and squirrels, rabbits, turtledoves, etc are also food down here.

Despite all of the talk about politeness, southern hospitality, etc, I think Southerners are more easily agitated. We will start (usually conservative religion- or politics-based) protests and crusades for or against things at the drop of a hat. People are also quick to start fights and/or threaten to shoot people over relatively minor slights.

There are also differences in child-rearing. Southern parents tend to be less helicopter-ish and more likely to let their kids play outside, ride bikes, etc. On the other hand, they are also more inclined to use corporal punishment and to support its use in schools.

Certain parts of the South, at least in Southern Appalachia (western NC, eastern TN) also have surprisingly large groups or communities of artists and hippie types. NC has places like Asheville & Boone while TN has "The Farm" and places like that.

Belle_91
09-27-2013, 06:47 AM
I was born in Danvers, MA but moved to TN where my dad's family is from when I was eighteen months olds. I go to New England a lot to visit my mom's family, so I kind of live the best of both world. Here are some points

* This may sound weird, but one thing I notice about coming to MA or NH or VT is the smell. It always smells of pine. Even now, when I get a whiff of that smell, I think of walking up Canon Mt. in New Hampshire or going to Santa's Village also in NH.

&I know from experience that you cannot find sweet tea ANYWHERE except for at McDonalds. (In my opinion, they have really good sweet tea because it's extra sweet).

*It's so cold and they have actual snow up there. In TN it's a big deal if we get six inches. The state will sort of shut down, while in MA they're getting six feet!

*Also, please know that not all Tennesseans are complete hicks. East Nashville has a very large hipster populations, same with Chattanooga where I go to school. I know many (my self included) who have gay, black, Muslim, Hispanic, ect friends. I'm a democrat, and I have NEVER met anyone from the Klan or seen them march or whatever the hell they still do decide make us all look bad. :rant:

*Ok, last thing I'll mention is that many Northerners are Catholic (me too) and so one thing that struck me was a lot of Catholic churches and Cathedrals in New England. This may strike your MC if she's religious, because the South is known for being very Protestant (save for good ole' LA).

Okay, sorry, I'm done.

P.S BardSkye you're welcome to come down any time, honey.

(we also refer to people--sometimes strangers--as honey or sugar. We also like to give sugar, but it doesn't come in a bowl if you catch my drift ;) )

wendymarlowe
09-27-2013, 08:36 AM
Religion is different. There are more churches in general and it's more socially acceptable to ask people where they go to church and invite strangers to your church (this seems to happen to me monthly, I don't think I look especially in need of saving). Also, most areas of the South are heavily Baptist & Methodist and many areas have lots of Pentecostals, compared to the North. There are relatively few Catholic churches (outside of Louisiana) and most of the parishes I've been to in NC are 1/2 or more Latino & Asian.

Ooh, that's definitely something else that took some getting used to. People in my part of the south are overwhelmingly Christian (Baptist or Methodist), straight, Republican, pro-military, and pro-guns. And since the population is so homogeneous, these are all perfectly acceptable topics of conversation because of course the complete stranger you're talking to will share your nuanced views on the topic(s). It's not uncommon for a cashier to open a conversation with the latest horrible thing the prezdent has done, or what those crazy anti-Christians are trying to do to our {Bible | school system | favorite TV shows | etc.}. Woe be unto the atheist who complains about having to participate in group prayer before staff meetings at the public library - a friend of mine was in that position and she had some pretty serious repercussions for requesting maybe they don't do that.

The thing is, I suspect many of the worst offenders (for lack of a better word) have never had anyone complain - they grew up like this, nobody minded these topics of conversation, and they have absolutely no idea that the person they're conversing with may be non-Christian/gay/politically liberal. Which makes it really hard for the non-Christian/gay/liberal people here to speak up, which makes the vocal majority more vocal, etc.

Oddly enough, those same demographics are absolutely true in many parts of the north as well - Christianity is the predominant religion pretty much everywhere in the US, 85-95% of the population is straight, and pockets of political ideology are pretty predictable. But in the north, the only acceptable topics of conversation are the weather, how you got to wherever you are when you're talking, and how you plan to get home :-P

benbradley
09-27-2013, 08:45 AM
Religious differences also affects food availability. Growing up in the South I don't recall ever hearing of a bagel, and it wasn't until the 1990s that I ate one (I was a bit sheltered anyway, and my Baptist mother tried to keep me away from anything Jewish). In the North there appears to be a larger Jewish population, and a bagel shop on every corner, but in the South I only know of the Einstein chain.

BardSkye
09-27-2013, 08:46 AM
P.S BardSkye you're welcome to come down any time, honey.



Why, thank you. That's very kind of you.

darkelf
09-27-2013, 10:42 AM
Biscuits and gravy. In MA, gravy is what we call spaghetti sauce. :)


I'm confused by this. I'm from MA, and gravy is made from meat drippings and flour; spaghetti sauce is made with tomatoes with basil and oregano. Do you mean you would put a beef or chicken sauce on pasta, instead of a tomato based one? Do you use tomato based sauces?



MA has a funny thing about fish too. Fried fish up there is halibut instead of catfish. Fish here comes with hush puppies. Clams dont' exist, we slurp oysters. Lobster has claws in the Bay Colony, here in Florida they don't. And we suck mudbugs. I like your Chowdah' but you can't do a decent gumbo to save your life. Okra is not slimy in the South.

I second that fried fish is usually cod or haddock, not halibut. Both halibut and sea bass are available in some places, but I think it's more seasonal. You can also find flounder, tuna, and swordfish. There isn't catfish here, and I don't know what hush puppies or mudbugs are. We have more than clams, you can also have mussels, scallops, or oysters. The lobsters with claws are often called Maine lobster, even though they can be found from about NJ up through Canada.

New England clam chowder is different from New York or Manhattan clam chowder. NE chowder is white and made with potatoes. Manhattan chowder is red and made with tomatoes.

I've never seen anyone in MA using lightbulbs or heaters for their cars. You'd need to be a bit further north for that I think.

Whenever a friend of mine from TX visits, she is always bothered by the cold, even when it isn't that chilly. Last winter was pretty mild (or was it two years ago?), I don't think I used anything heavier than a sweatshirt all season. She was bundled up in a heavy coat even when in the house, and sat as far from the door as she could. Whenever we teased her about the cold, she just invited us to visit TX in July.

She also finds it strange that people would wear a sweatshirt or coat with shorts. That is usually when the mornings/late evenings are in the 40s, and the afternoons are in the 70-80s.

Oh, and I don't know anyone who refers to pants or jeans as 'trousers'. Some older folks still call them 'slacks' though, but that's rare.


darkelf

debirlfan
09-27-2013, 11:20 AM
I'm a CT yankee who's been down south a few times, so from that perspective...

Up here, the store clerk puts your purchases in a bag (assuming they don't expect you to bag your own). Down south, you get a sack.

I have heard (rarely) spaghetti sauce referred to as "gravy," but I think that's more of an old world Italian thing. As to real sausage and (white) gravy with biscuits, I've never found any worth eating north of Pennsylvania.

We have something known as Johnny cakes -
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnnycake - which are quite good, and something known as Moxie -
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moxie - which is quite bad. :)

untechioux
09-27-2013, 11:21 AM
I'm confused by this. I'm from MA, and gravy is made from meat drippings and flour; spaghetti sauce is made with tomatoes with basil and oregano. Do you mean you would put a beef or chicken sauce on pasta, instead of a tomato based one? Do you use tomato based sauces?
darkelf

Many Italian-Americans will call homemade tomato sauce "gravy." I don't think anyone else does. The first time I heard a friend talking about macaroni and gravy, I was like "Ew!" It took me a while to figure it out.

Chasing the Horizon
09-27-2013, 11:27 AM
Ooh, that's definitely something else that took some getting used to. People in my part of the south are overwhelmingly Christian (Baptist or Methodist), straight, Republican, pro-military, and pro-guns. And since the population is so homogeneous, these are all perfectly acceptable topics of conversation because of course the complete stranger you're talking to will share your nuanced views on the topic(s). It's not uncommon for a cashier to open a conversation with the latest horrible thing the prezdent has done, or what those crazy anti-Christians are trying to do to our {Bible | school system | favorite TV shows | etc.}. Woe be unto the atheist who complains about having to participate in group prayer before staff meetings at the public library - a friend of mine was in that position and she had some pretty serious repercussions for requesting maybe they don't do that.
I don't think you can generalize an entire region this way. The town where I grew up (in the north) was like you describe, and the place I live now is very liberal. You want to know how far I moved? 20 miles. I didn't move to a larger town either, just closer to a pair of liberal arts colleges.


But in the north, the only acceptable topics of conversation are the weather, how you got to wherever you are when you're talking, and how you plan to get home :-P
This is true. Oh, and the make, model, year, and engine specifications of your car are also acceptable topics, it seems.

blacbird
09-27-2013, 11:42 AM
Having lived in the Deep South (New Orleans), the slightly shallower South (Dallas), the marginal South (Tidewater Virginia), the north (Iowa, Minnesota) and now the REAL North (Alaska), I can opine with certainty that the one thing that really weirds out true Southerners about the North is . . .

SNOW.

caw

Cathy C
09-27-2013, 02:35 PM
Things that bite. It seems like everything that crawls, flies, and slithers bites in The south (particularly in Texas) A dozen varieties of poisonous snakes, add a hundred or so aggressive spiders, scorpions, mahogany wasps, yellow jackets, tarantula hawks (http://www.ciecatrunpubs.com/Tarantula Hawk for web.jpg) (look at the little wasp in the foreground...that's a regular yellow wasp, both killed in my back yard. Everything's bigger in Texas after all...[shudder]), fire ants, flesh-eating harvester ants, and even biting caterpillars (http://www.kplctv.com/story/22976957/warning-about-io-moth-caterpillar-stings)]! I mean, c'mon! Fluffy little caterpillars?
That's just wrong!

I lived for years in the north without encountering more than a handful of insects that were aggressive/dangerous.

IClaytonR
09-27-2013, 04:25 PM
Just a couple of quick things that have already been touched upon.

-There's a religion/alcohol paradigm in the south. In general people drink secretly, and go to another town to buy their booze. Many towns and districts don't allow alcohol sales.

-Overall the politics are very different. Even a fairly liberal southerner will be surprised at how many rules and laws their are in the north, and possibly relieved by the lack of laws based on morality.

-In Texas when it snows, the world shuts down. No school, no work, no driving. Why? Because it melts a little during the day and refreezes at night and turns to ice, plus, there's no system in place to removed the snow. It's easier to shut down two days a year than to invest all that equipment when it may not even snow.

-Southerners think northerners talk funny...and vice versa. Northerners tend to think southerners sound dumb, and southerners tend to think northerners sound rude.

King Neptune
09-27-2013, 04:45 PM
Religious differences also affects food availability. Growing up in the South I don't recall ever hearing of a bagel, and it wasn't until the 1990s that I ate one (I was a bit sheltered anyway, and my Baptist mother tried to keep me away from anything Jewish). In the North there appears to be a larger Jewish population, and a bagel shop on every corner, but in the South I only know of the Einstein chain.

Bagels were developed as a bread for Lent in Poland in the 14th century, so your Baptist mother was keeping you away from something Christian.

Barbara R.
09-27-2013, 04:48 PM
No sweet tea. In the south, you ask for it at a restaurant and you get tea that's had sugar or sweetener added while it was being brewed. It's cold and, well, sweet, sometimes teeth-rottingly so. Go north of Virginia and ask for sweet tea, and you get looked at like you just grew a second head (or told they only have unsweetened tea.) If you're accustomed to getting it while you're out to dinner, it's hard to get used to.

Okay, I'll bite: What IS sweet tea, if not tea with sweetener added? Or are all you southerners pulling our leg?

Cathy C
09-27-2013, 05:07 PM
Making proper sweet tea (http://www.food.com/recipe/absolutely-the-best-southern-sweet-tea-281409) The secret is completely dissolving the boatload of sugar in the water BEFORE adding the tea for steeping.

Made my jaw hurt the first time I tasted it. I drink unsweetened...

Saanen
09-27-2013, 05:13 PM
My grandmother used to make amazing sweet tea. I never asked her how much sugar went into it--I didn't want to know. :) These days I drink unsweet and brew it myself because most fast food restaurants have nasty, nasty tea (their sweet tea tastes like corn syrup, unsweet tastes like dusty water). Most sit-down restaurants actually brew their tea from bags so it's not too bad, but you definitely have to specify unsweet tea down here. If not you get regular sweet tea. Oh, and if you ask for unsweet tea they assume you want a lot of Splenda or something to mix in it.

Lyra Jean
09-27-2013, 05:34 PM
I'm from Florida. Some people call it the the southern most northern state because of the transplants but it's the south.

I did live in SC for 7 years or so. One winter it snowed in Atlanta GA and left about an inch and a half of snow on the ground. They had to shut down the airport. They interviewed some guy from I think New York and he couldn't understand why the airport was shut down.

Also down here we get a lot of transplants in the winter. I don't know if it's because I work at Walmart or what. But I'm always hearing them complain about living here. I'm not talking about oh I miss snow. I mean they have told me to my face that the South is stupid and everyone who is from here is stupid. It just makes me want to say, "Well, I live here. You choose to come here every year. Who's more stupid. But that will just get me fired."

I guess that's really more of the other way around.

I have a degree in History. USF alum. We've had history students from up north who thought that the South was some sort of depraved hell hole for blacks around the Civil War time period and that the North was some sort of heavenly utopia for blacks around that same time period. It's not really what they said about the South it's the comparison to the North that bugs me.

Also they either don't know where the Mason-Dixon line is or they have never heard of it.

Maggie Maxwell
09-27-2013, 05:48 PM
Okay, I'll bite: What IS sweet tea, if not tea with sweetener added? Or are all you southerners pulling our leg?

Cathy C's got it with that recipe. I usually think of it as "a glass of sugar with tea in". Amounts of sweetener than make your teeth tingle.

King Neptune
09-27-2013, 06:03 PM
I'm from Florida. Some people call it the the southern most northern state because of the transplants but it's the south.

I did live in SC for 7 years or so. One winter it snowed in Atlanta GA and left about an inch and a half of snow on the ground. They had to shut down the airport. They interviewed some guy from I think New York and he couldn't understand why the airport was shut down.

Also down here we get a lot of transplants in the winter. I don't know if it's because I work at Walmart or what. But I'm always hearing them complain about living here. I'm not talking about oh I miss snow. I mean they have told me to my face that the South is stupid and everyone who is from here is stupid. It just makes me want to say, "Well, I live here. You choose to come here every year. Who's more stupid. But that will just get me fired."

I guess that's really more of the other way around.

I have a degree in History. USF alum. We've had history students from up north who thought that the South was some sort of depraved hell hole for blacks around the Civil War time period and that the North was some sort of heavenly utopia for blacks around that same time period. It's not really what they said about the South it's the comparison to the North that bugs me.

Also they either don't know where the Mason-Dixon line is or they have never heard of it.

It doesn't take a history major to know what the Mason-Dixon line is. I wonder why someone would study at the college level who knew so little about it.

Maybe it's time to write about the economic reasons for the Civil War.

amrose
09-27-2013, 06:04 PM
biting caterpillars (http://www.kplctv.com/story/22976957/warning-about-io-moth-caterpillar-stings)]! I mean, c'mon! Fluffy little caterpillars?

Forgot about caterpillar season.

With all the oak canopies uptown, during caterpillar season there are carpets of spiny stingy ones that drop out of the trees. Gotta hopscotch over them. All the ones already squished ooze this yellow gunk. Very slippery.

Oh, and then pollen season when everything's covered with yellow dust and I can't go outside without my whole body swelling.

Alpha Echo
09-27-2013, 06:10 PM
This is a fun thread, though I didn't read it all. I'm in Northern VA, kinda in between the south and north.




Rotaries (traffic circles). Common in MA, unheard of everywhere else.
Politics and sports are serious business. Do not take the Sox's name in vein.
People appearing cold, brusk and unapproachable. But once we're friends, we really mean it.



1. We have traffic circles everywhere.
2. I'm close to DC, so yes to politics.
3. I would agree with that as well.


People do not want to stop and talk. It's not necessarily rude, but it seems that way when you're used to putting a claim on someone's time. It's simple courtesy to respond in kind.

Which brings me to the other point. Everything happens faster. Southerners are still in the Second Wave, an agrarian society. People aren't machines, it's counterproductive to treat them that way.

Yeah...I think people here are much cooler too. I'm a pretty friendly person I think. I stop to talk to anyone. But I don't want to stand there and talk for hours. Those in the South do.

And yes, I'm used to a fast pace. I'm always rushing. I always have everything planned. I've noticed that in the South and also in Canada, the exact opposite is true. It can easily take an hour to get someone out the door. I have to try to plan to have an hour lead time.

I'm surprised, at least through page 3, no one mentioned that up here, college football is not really a big deal. At all. But I know in the South, it's just about everything. High school football too. While some parents get into it up here, it's not at all the crazy all-important thing it is in the South.

My husband's family is from KY, and I know they miss their grits. It's a staple at our family holiday gatherings - cheesy grits, garlic grits, you name it.

Something I've noticed about his family also - they will do anything for you. One time when my husband was in his late teens, one of his best friend's brothers went on a road trip. His car broke down in the middle of the night, and he called my mother-in-law looking for DH I suppose. He wasn't there, but she was, and in the middle of the night, she found the kid a nearby hotel and drove out to him to help him get his car taken care of.

My dad is a really great guy, but I don't see him doing that. I don't know that I would do that either!

Oh, to the speech - Southerners talk so slowly! I don't think I speak particularly fast, but sometimes, I just want to scream "Get it out already!"

I agree with the cook-out/barbeque thing. Although, I grew up in MD, and it was cook-out. When I lived in NY, it was barbeque.

Bagels, pizza by the slice.

Oh! And I remember in NY, they called a pizza a pie. I remember the first time we were at a friend's house, and she said, "Let's order a cheese pie." I thought she meant a cheese. pie. Like an apple pie only cheese. I thought that was really strange, so I was relieved to find she meant pizza.

Rina Evans
09-27-2013, 06:10 PM
Making proper sweet tea (http://www.food.com/recipe/absolutely-the-best-southern-sweet-tea-281409) The secret is completely dissolving the boatload of sugar in the water BEFORE adding the tea for steeping.

Made my jaw hurt the first time I tasted it. I drink unsweetened...

I had a notion sweet tea was caramelized sugar water. Caramelizing sugar, then adding more water, and fridging it. I wonder if you guys make it and what it would be called.

Sorry for the derail.

Little Anonymous Me
09-27-2013, 07:26 PM
I had a notion sweet tea was caramelized sugar water. Caramelizing sugar, then adding more water, and fridging it. I wonder if you guys make it and what it would be called.

Sorry for the derail.



Never heard of anybody doing it that way, though I suppose it's possible. In general, so long as the tea is brewed hot and then chilled, you've made sweet tea right. Now, if you use some nasty mix thing....:tongue

Mark Moore
09-27-2013, 08:21 PM
As a cashier as Wally World in the South, I can attest to the following:

*People buy beer and wine as much as they buy water.

*Any random customer might try to drag you into a political discussion (doesn't happen often, but it happens).

*Customers might talk about the Bible. I had these two old women in my line once. I didn't hear their entire conversation, but one of them was like "Well, we're near that time anyway, according to the Bible." Another customer once bought bananas, and we were talking about them. I don't remember what brought this up, but I was trying to be funny with "I don't know the ways of bananas." The guy was like "It's not about knowing their ways; it's about knowledge. Ignorance leads to death, according to God's Scripture." I wanted to punch him in the face.

*I once stopped at a gas station at night. On my way back to my car, a guy stopped me and was like "I'm not a thief." He then asked me for money. Avoiding eye contact with him, I quickly made my way to my car and unlocked the door. I was like "No, thanks." He said "May God treat you the same." I should have said "Watch out for lightning", but I didn't think of it at the time.

Sunflowerrei
09-28-2013, 08:33 AM
I'm from NYC, went to college in Boston. I visited Memphis for a wedding a few years back and I thought: a) Oh, my God, you guys have Sonic! We don't have those in the city.

b)Everybody drives. Everyone. I don't drive. Most of my friends don't drive. We use public transportation.

c)The slow talking. I speak pretty quickly. It took me a second to understand when a lady was talking to me.

One of my college roommates was from Florida. She spent the entire Boston winter (which, even for me, felt dark and cold and I'm from the Northeast) in sweatshirts and flannel pajamas. She also said, "Fixin' to" a lot.

Medievalist
09-28-2013, 09:21 AM
Never heard of anybody doing it that way, though I suppose it's possible. In general, so long as the tea is brewed hot and then chilled, you've made sweet tea right. Now, if you use some nasty mix thing....:tongue

That mix stuff qualifies a sin, right enough.

My mom, a native of South Carolina, cruelly forced to relocate to New England in the 1960s, still gets care packages of yellow grits, country ham, pecans in the shell, and Luzianne tea (http://www.luzianne.com/site.php) for the making of sweet tea.

cornflake
09-28-2013, 12:01 PM
I'm from NYC, went to college in Boston. I visited Memphis for a wedding a few years back and I thought: a) Oh, my God, you guys have Sonic! We don't have those in the city.

b)Everybody drives. Everyone. I don't drive. Most of my friends don't drive. We use public transportation.

c)The slow talking. I speak pretty quickly. It took me a second to understand when a lady was talking to me.

One of my college roommates was from Florida. She spent the entire Boston winter (which, even for me, felt dark and cold and I'm from the Northeast) in sweatshirts and flannel pajamas. She also said, "Fixin' to" a lot.

People can have a hard time grasping the no driving thing, I find, and it's not something someone from a place where all kids get a license as a teen and all schools have driver's ed thinks of. That's a good one I totally forgot.

If the character is going to NYC, seconding that's a thing. Most people don't own cars and plenty couldn't drive 'em if they did. I know many, many adults who have never been behind the wheel of a car, and it can be generational, with no one in a family being able to drive.

Of course, there are people who do know and people who have cars, but like, on Seinfeld where everyone both knew how to drive and I think 3/4 of the characters actually owned cars, but no one was rich? No.

Cathy C
09-28-2013, 05:03 PM
I forgot to mention town squares. In the south, there really ARE town squares. The towns were built around the courthouse, which are often architectural works of art--so there is a square of roads around the courthouse and often a wide expanse of lawn where there are Saturday night or special event dances or public parties.

I was reminded by the comment about everyone driving in the South. I've seen people go into a store on one side of the square, then get into their car and move to the other side to go to a different shop! Nearly every offense in Texas (not just traffic, but child support non-payment, non-payment of gasoline, drugs in your home) will get your driver's license taken away. To a lot of people here, it's the equivalent of a dozen years behind bars. I work in a law office where driving suspensions are the ones most likely to panic people. There are no cabs, no buses, no subways. None. Take away the car and leave them on foot when the nearest mall is 70 miles away? You've got a person's attention! :ROFL:

jkenton
09-28-2013, 07:02 PM
"Pop" instead of "soda." Cornbread. Up north it's sweet and cake-like, instead of buttermilk salty, and not even a lick of bacon grease. The biscuits aren't much better. The hot wings are better, but the ribs aren't.

`Raine
09-28-2013, 09:27 PM
I forgot to mention town squares. In the south, there really ARE town squares. The towns were built around the courthouse, which are often architectural works of art--so there is a square of roads around the courthouse and often a wide expanse of lawn where there are Saturday night or special event dances or public parties.

True for my area too, and many of these are the "old" courthouse. Lots of towns have preserved them and turned them into local history museums after building newer courthouses nearby.

Many also use the town squares for festivals, live music, and sometimes for small protests and political gatherings (most here have either been the local Tea Party - notable exceptions were one favoring amnesty and more rights for immigrants and one supporting gay marriage).

untechioux
09-28-2013, 10:19 PM
"pop" vs soda map
http://strangemaps.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/popvssodamap.gif

Mark Moore
09-28-2013, 11:47 PM
True for my area too, and many of these are the "old" courthouse. Lots of towns have preserved them and turned them into local history museums after building newer courthouses nearby.

Yeah, my county has an "old courthouse" with the new one nearby.

I recall reading a story, years ago, about how, back in the 19th century, one group "stole" the courthouse by packing all of the furniture and such into covered wagons and driving it away in the middle of the night.

I forgot about the no-driving thing that I'd read about before. I guess it makes sense. We have a bus system in my county, but it sucks. The buses run for only limited hours. Everyone drives down here.

I suppose, in my stories set in big cities, I should have my characters use public transit. Except maybe the rich ones. I guess I'm just brainwashed by reading about how every teen in Archie Comics has a car. Of course, those stories can't agree on the size of Riverdale anyway.

Mark Moore
09-28-2013, 11:53 PM
"pop" vs soda map
http://strangemaps.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/popvssodamap.gif

That map's interesting. Even though I'm from Illinois, I prefer soda (which, according to the map, is more of a northeastern term) instead of pop. To me, "pop" sounds kiddy. "Ooh, the bubbles are popping, so I'm gonna call it 'pop'! Tee-hee! I'm funny, Mommy!"

I've heard only a handful of people call it "coke" down here. More people call it "soda". Most people call it "pop".

Anyway, "soda" is in the name of the drink "club soda". It's never called "club pop" or "club coke".

Lyra Jean
09-29-2013, 06:18 AM
Sometimes I say soda sometimes coke. But I live in a yellow county in Florida on the soda/pop/coke map

cornflake
09-29-2013, 11:01 AM
Yeah, my county has an "old courthouse" with the new one nearby.

I recall reading a story, years ago, about how, back in the 19th century, one group "stole" the courthouse by packing all of the furniture and such into covered wagons and driving it away in the middle of the night.

I forgot about the no-driving thing that I'd read about before. I guess it makes sense. We have a bus system in my county, but it sucks. The buses run for only limited hours. Everyone drives down here.

I suppose, in my stories set in big cities, I should have my characters use public transit. Except maybe the rich ones. I guess I'm just brainwashed by reading about how every teen in Archie Comics has a car. Of course, those stories can't agree on the size of Riverdale anyway.

Weren't they in California? I think that's a different deal.

Just a note - even the rich tend to use mass transit within the city in NYC. There who don't tend to be people in cabs or car services, not people like, getting in their own cars in the morning and driving to work all without leaving Manhattan. That'd just almost never happen, regardless of wealth.

blacbird
09-29-2013, 11:26 AM
"pop" vs soda map
http://strangemaps.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/popvssodamap.gif

Wonderful map. I saved it. I grew up in a top-of-the-line "pop" county, but after much nomadism, including Army service, now am a "soda" person. I'm actually not sure where or when that change happened.

I would never, however, use "coke" to mean anything beverage-wise other than Coca-cola.

As an aside, I also lived for three-plus years in New Orleans, where the Barq's beverage company is based. In addition to being famed for their (quite good) root beer, they also produce a cream soda, red as a ripe fire engine, and virulently sweet. In Da Big Easy, this is known as the "red drink", if you order it and don't want to appear to be a yankee idjit, pronounced as "ray-ed drink".

caw

Barbara R.
09-29-2013, 04:55 PM
Thanks, Cathy C! The stuff you can learn on this forum!

Mark Moore
09-29-2013, 06:31 PM
Weren't they in California? I think that's a different deal.

No. The location of Riverdale is deliberately (and frustratingly) left vague, so it can be "Anywhere, USA". The only clues are it gets all four seasons, and it has a beach.

The fandom seems to prefer a northeast location, and I specifically consider it to be in New York (there are even some clues in some stories that support this).

cornflake
09-29-2013, 08:26 PM
No. The location of Riverdale is deliberately (and frustratingly) left vague, so it can be "Anywhere, USA". The only clues are it gets all four seasons, and it has a beach.

The fandom seems to prefer a northeast location, and I specifically consider it to be in New York (there are even some clues in some stories that support this).

Well, it has a beach, the teens all drive and have cars and there are all freestanding houses. It ain't NYC. ;) Nor is it Riverdale in the Bronx, obvs.

scarecrow
09-30-2013, 01:09 AM
The use of mam and sir. In the south we are still teaching children to respect their elders with these terms. My northern friends think its horrific and old fashioned.

The kids call us by our first names. ( Ms. Mary-Jo and Mr. Bubba :D)

The lack of a church on every corner and the number of bars.

The first time I went to NY I couldn't figure out why there were so many hearses (must be the number of bars). My father had to explain they were limos. I was young.

TellMeAStory
09-30-2013, 02:38 AM
When we lived in married students' housing in Montana, we got a new neighbor up from the South. In a welcoming kind of way, I assured her that winters weren't all that bad if you dressed for the cold, and she assured me she was well equipped for that, she'd got a really heavy sweater (!) Then she asked if there was a Wynn Dixie nearby, and when I said it wasn't likely she'd find anything with the name "Dixie" in it, I think she nearly cried.

Mark Moore
09-30-2013, 05:17 AM
Well, it has a beach, the teens all drive and have cars and there are all freestanding houses. It ain't NYC. ;) Nor is it Riverdale in the Bronx, obvs.

Hehe, well, I didn't mean in NYC; I meant in New York state. There are a few stories where they just casually go to NYC (Ginger has some fashion business "in the city" and invites Veronica to tag along, Archie has the gang meet him at the New York Stock Exchange to watch him invest a dollar, etc.).

Anyway, more Southern stuff:

*Customers WILL find a way to get to Walmart, even if they don't drive. I once had a customer mention to me that he's going to talk to management about leaving his riding mower parked there overnight.

*I've never heard anyone refer to it as The Walmart (except Jeff Foxworthy). Some people do call it "Walmart's", though, likely either mistakenly thinking it has a possessive form or mixing it up with Walgreens.

*Every store is Walmart to the customers. When I worked at Kmart, I had four customers that wrote out checks to Walmart.

*Meth labs. Lots of drug busts by the local sheriff's office.

*Shoes and/or shirts seem to be optional in some customers' minds.

*Drunk customers come in to buy more booze.

Sunflowerrei
09-30-2013, 09:28 AM
People can have a hard time grasping the no driving thing, I find, and it's not something someone from a place where all kids get a license as a teen and all schools have driver's ed thinks of. That's a good one I totally forgot.

If the character is going to NYC, seconding that's a thing. Most people don't own cars and plenty couldn't drive 'em if they did. I know many, many adults who have never been behind the wheel of a car, and it can be generational, with no one in a family being able to drive.

Of course, there are people who do know and people who have cars, but like, on Seinfeld where everyone both knew how to drive and I think 3/4 of the characters actually owned cars, but no one was rich? No.

Keeping a car in Manhattan would be crazy, yeah. But people drive and own cars in the boroughs, where I'm from, but it feels generational. A lot of people my age, in our mid twenties, don't drive. We don't have driver's ed in the NYC public schools and we couldn't afford car payments anyway. But my cousins on Long Island drive. They drive their parents' car, but still.

As for Massachusetts? In Boston, it'd be crazier to keep a car than keeping one in NYC. They have the MBTA, after all, and commuter rail. But I suspect that the suburbs and Western Massachusetts are more like Long Island, where public transportation is not very reliable or non-existent.

I wonder where in Mass. the OP is setting their story? I could definitely share some moving to Boston stories.

King Neptune
09-30-2013, 03:55 PM
Keeping a car in Manhattan would be crazy, yeah. But people drive and own cars in the boroughs, where I'm from, but it feels generational. A lot of people my age, in our mid twenties, don't drive. We don't have driver's ed in the NYC public schools and we couldn't afford car payments anyway. But my cousins on Long Island drive. They drive their parents' car, but still.

As for Massachusetts? In Boston, it'd be crazier to keep a car than keeping one in NYC. They have the MBTA, after all, and commuter rail. But I suspect that the suburbs and Western Massachusetts are more like Long Island, where public transportation is not very reliable or non-existent.

There are some people in Boston who do without cars, but as a percent it is a small percentage. Public transportation in Central and Western Massachusetts is spotty. There are some places where it is more than adequate, but in many places there is none.

ap123
09-30-2013, 03:55 PM
Actually, keeping a car in Manhattan has much to do with whether or not your building has a garage. Ours does, Husband works outside of the city, so we have a car. We are nowhere near wealthy people. Nowhere. We also don't/wouldn't use the car to run errands within Manhattan.

I didn't get a license until I was umm, 25? And I haven't driven in years.

My 20yo still doesn't have a license. Without a parking spot, with a Metro card, it falls way down the list of priorities/rites of passage for teens and young adults.

There are also many middle/upper middle class families who keep cars in public garages for weekends, traveling back and forth to country houses.

For the record, it isn't the cabs that make driving in Manhattan insanity, it's the delivery guys on bikes! ;)

Saanen
09-30-2013, 11:31 PM
Just to add to the coke/pop/soda thing, we say coke here. My brother who has lived in PA for more than 15 years now says the only thing he still hasn't adapted to is calling coke pop (or soda--can't remember what they say up there).

When I was about 12, my grandmother's next door neighbor had her grandsons visit from Michigan, and we hung out together all summer. I remember the older boy asking me if I wanted to go get a pop, and I had NO CLUE what he meant. I assumed he was talking about bubble gum since it was the only thing I could think of that made a pop. :)

Similarly, I was 15 before I knew what a bagel was (keep in mind that I'm now in my 40s so this has been a while). A friend of my mom's brought her of those net bags full of bagels back from a trip to NYC, and Mom left them on the counter. I came home from school, saw them, and thought, "Hey, doughnuts!" I was disappointed with my first bite for sure. :)

snafu1056
10-01-2013, 05:07 AM
Similarly, I was 15 before I knew what a bagel was

That's ok. I didn't know what a hushpuppy was until I was 25.

redfalcon
10-01-2013, 05:30 AM
In the rural south you can see three or four generations of men talking over the bed of a pick-up. If they are watching young children they are inside the bed, if they are older kids they rotate between the tailgate and play.

The one thing that amazed me about Northerners is how they yell and cuss each other like it's civilized talk.

Oh, and in the south they have redneck fighting where two drunk guys bump chests while asking each other if they want some.

And what is with the vinegar flavored chips? ewwwwwwwwwwwwww

wendymarlowe
10-01-2013, 06:17 AM
Vinegar chips aren't that horrible, but the "chicken and waffle" flavor really mess with my head.

http://zeropeoplefoundthishelpful.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/ChickenWaffleLays.jpg

roseangel
10-01-2013, 08:08 AM
I've tried them, they aren't too bad, though not my fave.

KellyAssauer
10-01-2013, 03:38 PM
This is a question for American Southerners - my MC is moving from Tennessee to Massachusetts for college. What was the strangest thing for you to get used to up North? Food wise, lifestyle wise, etc? What did you like about it? Thanks in advance!

All the talk about soda/pop/coke and no one has mentioned the fact that once over the wall, you can't find things, like an RC. It's not like grits, northerners have heard of grits, but forget about walking into a store and grabbing a Nehi, or a Yahoo. It's not on the shelf! If you get that occasional craving for an ice cold Crush... you better have brought it with you.

Or say you got in the habit of Sunday morning Biscuits & Gravy at Hardee's... (not saying who here) but there isn't a Hardee's anywhere. There isn't anyone working in any store (besides perhaps Wally World) that's going to say "Hey" when you walk in. It just doesn't happen.

And if for some reason you do get befriended by a local, expect them to be completely ignorant of any standard social graces. They might stop by at 6:30 in the evening when you're setting the table and they just don't know any better than to excuse themselves... or worse yet, they might call you after 9pm, and it's not an emergency? And as another minute turns into a half an hour... you'll find yourself sitting there in a stunned disbelief wondering when they are going to realize what they've done... but they never do.

So it's not always the 'differences' that's disquieting, it's the complete lack of things familiar that will throw you off.

*having read every page of this thread, I so wanna go home now. =(

King Neptune
10-01-2013, 03:54 PM
All the talk about soda/pop/coke and no one has mentioned the fact that once over the wall, you can't find things, like an RC. It's not like grits, northerners have heard of grits, but forget about walking into a store and grabbing a Nehi, or a Yahoo. It's not on the shelf! If you get that occasional craving for an ice cold Crush... you better have brought it with you.

Or say you got in the habit of Sunday morning Biscuits & Gravy at Hardee's... (not saying who here) but there isn't a Hardee's anywhere. There isn't anyone working in any store (besides perhaps Wally World) that's going to say "Hey" when you walk in. It just doesn't happen.

And if for some reason you do get befriended by a local, expect them to be completely ignorant of any standard social graces. They might stop by at 6:30 in the evening when you're setting the table and they just don't know any better than to excuse themselves... or worse yet, they might call you after 9pm, and it's not an emergency? And as another minute turns into a half an hour... you'll find yourself sitting there in a stunned disbelief wondering when they are going to realize what they've done... but they never do.

So it's not always the 'differences' that's disquieting, it's the complete lack of things familiar that will throw you off.

*having read every page of this thread, I so wanna go home now. =(

You must be in the Boston area. It's hard to find anythig there. In normal parts of Massachusetts one can readily buy Royal Crown, and sometimes Nehi, and did you mean YooHoo? That is readily available. But the Hardee's did close. There's a Mexican place there now. And people do sau "Hey" when you walk into some stores, assuming that they notice you.

It's a pity that you have met ill-mannered people.

KellyAssauer
10-01-2013, 04:17 PM
I'm in Pennsylvania and I've been here to long. I'm convinced that I'll never again see a man stand up when I enter a room, let alone offer his seat, or hold a door open. It just doesn't happen.

There was a spell when I kept track on my calendar of how often I heard a person say "excuse me" (having given up entirely on hearing 'pardon me') which became less than 10 times a year.

I don't feel as if I'm telling anything out of turn, it's just the way things are up over the wall. It wears on you after a period of time, and one begins to lower their expectations. =)

King Neptune
10-01-2013, 04:45 PM
I'm in Pennsylvania and I've been here to long. I'm convinced that I'll never again see a man stand up when I enter a room, let alone offer his seat, or hold a door open. It just doesn't happen.

There was a spell when I kept track on my calendar of how often I heard a person say "excuse me" (having given up entirely on hearing 'pardon me') which became less than 10 times a year.

I don't feel as if I'm telling anything out of turn, it's just the way things are up over the wall. It wears on you after a period of time, and one begins to lower their expectations. =)

If I were you, then I would escape over the wall.

Cathy C
10-01-2013, 06:50 PM
It wears on you after a period of time, and one begins to lower their expectations. =)

It's interesting you phrase it that way, because I've begun to lower my expectations after being down south. It's not so much the courtesies, but the standard of quality. I expect high quality from myself as well as services I pay for. My expectations for restaurants, for example, have unfortunately moved from "would meet there to seal a million dollar business deal" up north to "hey, it didn't make me sick this week!" down south. I wish it was only my town, too. It seems to be pervasive that standards of quality for cities don't apply to smaller towns. Even small towns up north demand a certain level of quality in order to attract buyers of goods. Nobody seems to care down here what quality they put out. It makes me :(

But I insist on "big-city standards" (their term, not mine) for the work I produce at my day job. On the plus side, it means more major transactions come through the office than surrounding offices. :D

cornflake
10-01-2013, 07:43 PM
All the talk about soda/pop/coke and no one has mentioned the fact that once over the wall, you can't find things, like an RC. It's not like grits, northerners have heard of grits, but forget about walking into a store and grabbing a Nehi, or a Yahoo. It's not on the shelf! If you get that occasional craving for an ice cold Crush... you better have brought it with you.

Or say you got in the habit of Sunday morning Biscuits & Gravy at Hardee's... (not saying who here) but there isn't a Hardee's anywhere. There isn't anyone working in any store (besides perhaps Wally World) that's going to say "Hey" when you walk in. It just doesn't happen.

And if for some reason you do get befriended by a local, expect them to be completely ignorant of any standard social graces. They might stop by at 6:30 in the evening when you're setting the table and they just don't know any better than to excuse themselves... or worse yet, they might call you after 9pm, and it's not an emergency? And as another minute turns into a half an hour... you'll find yourself sitting there in a stunned disbelief wondering when they are going to realize what they've done... but they never do.

So it's not always the 'differences' that's disquieting, it's the complete lack of things familiar that will throw you off.

*having read every page of this thread, I so wanna go home now. =(

Lots of people say hello when you walk into their (small) store here, and people who know me at big stores not only greet me but chat. Like the cashiers I'm friendlier with at the local market (which has a lot of cashiers), say hi, what's up, one always asks what I'm making based on what I'm buying (not in that weird way where the cashier examines your groceries silently way or the way where they ask like no one has ever eaten a mushroom, but in a we both like to cook way) or etc.

As to the calling - I think of that as a kid or job thing, not a regional thing, personally. People with kids tend to get a 9:30 or 10:00 cutoff unless you know they don't care - everyone else just depends. I know people I don't call after 10 because I know they're in bed. I know people I call at midnight because I know they're not, or if they are, they'll just ignore it. :Shrug: If someone doesn't want to talk though, I do expect them to say so ('I've got to run...') and not just sit on the phone wondering when I'll realize I called too late for them if they don't say so?

I dunno from the soda shortage thing, but I do remember seeing a truck with Crush on the side of it the other day, heh.

Kathl33n
10-05-2013, 11:10 PM
My mother is from NC and my father grew up in Brooklyn, NY, so I'm a wild mix.

The funniest parts are the accents, which neither one of them has fully lost since moving to VA and living their lives for over 40 years there.

My mother will say things like carrot, but she'll throw in a "n" in it (car-ent). And I've always thought that saying idea with an "r" sound at the end (idear) was a Southern trait she had until I watched American Chopper and saw that Paul Sr. said it this way (they're in Orange County, NY).

My father will say "sodar" and call women "Lisar" instead of Lisa. When we go out for ice cream, he wants "Ver-nillar." But where the "r's" are supposed to be, he often leaves them out. My mom's name is Barbara, and it sounds like he is calling her "Ba Ba." Sometimes other people in the family will call her Ba Ba to be funny.

He also says "electrizzzzidy," and she says "electricity."

Whenever I'd go to visit my aunt in NY, I'd hang out with her neighbor's daughter, and they'd all laugh and say I sounded like I fell off of a hill somewhere.

I love how a certain person on the food network (who isn't there anymore HINT HINT) had people write in and ask what "all" was (oil).

My mother went to one of those hot dog stands with my dad in NY and asked if she could have chili in her hot dog and the lady running it turned and said, "You want jelly on your hot dog?" He he he.

I was with my dad in a grocery store once, and he asked the lady behind the deli counter for Yellow American cheese, and she politely told him she didn't have any "Yo Ho" cheese.

Anyway, when we have big family get-togethers, we all tease each other on how we pronounce things. Big laughs.

Cathy C
10-06-2013, 03:38 PM
Oh! Speaking of jelly...everytime I go to a fast food place for breakfast and order a breakfast sandwich (McDonalds, Burger King, Arby's,) I get asked if I want jelly. I thought it was just like asking if I wanted ketchup at first, except I kept only having a sandwich---nothing to put jelly on, such as a biscuit or roll. I finally asked the clerk at my local McDonalds why she asked, since I'd only ordered an Egg McMuffin, and she said "Oh, most of the people I know put jelly on their sandwich." With cheese, egg & sausage? Really? :Wha:

Maybe it's just in Texas (or my little part if it). Anyone else from the South care to weigh in on jelly?

Saanen
10-06-2013, 05:50 PM
Barf, jelly with savory flavors is disgusting! No one I know would put jelly on a bacon egg and cheese biscuit or anything like that. My mom's family is from west Texas (moved here to Tennessee in the early 60s) and none of them plop jelly all over egg mcmuffins. :) Jelly on a plain biscuit is good though.

Mark Moore
10-06-2013, 11:16 PM
I don't know if this is a Southern thing or just a Citrus County thing, but...

When I worked at Kmart, I somehow got talked into getting trained to run the Nathan's Famous Hot Dog stand that they had set up in there (yeah, a hot dog stand...in a Kmart...in a mall). Then they kept putting me there, because I was trained for it. I hated it.

The "wagon" (as they called it, even though it had no wheels) was run by an obese, cigarette-smoking, alcoholic black woman from...Georgia, I think. She was way too enthusiastic about it and would abuse the intercom by advertising a "fifteen-minute Blue Light Special" on the hot dogs, giving reminders every five minutes, followed by "another fifteen-minute Blue Light Special", and so on. It drove me crazy.

She'd also come up with these rhymes, such as "If you're in the mood for a bite, come on over to where the price is right" and "If you have a buck, then you're in luck". She had a custom name badge that listed her position as "Hot Dog Queen".

She'd get on my case when I wouldn't heat up the bun in the microwave, because "the customers love a hot bun". Conversely, one of the service desk girls, who also ran the stupid thing, told me to NOT heat up the buns, because the microwave would dry them out, and she got yelled at by customers for it.

Anyway, I was told some customers might come in right when the store opens, and the first thing that they'd do is go over to the hot dog stand and order a hot dog. I never had that happen. However, I was told by the store manager, if it did happen (and I obviously would just be getting the hot dogs out of the freezer in the storage room when the store opens), I was to take a raw hot dog and nuke it in the microwave to "satisfy the customer".

nkbailey
10-07-2013, 08:55 AM
I’m from eastern Kentucky, and I’m in college in Boston.

First off—Southerners don’t often talk about Northerners. We talk about Yankees.

Iced Lipton ain’t tea. It’s Luzianne all the way down here.

“Bless their heart” is indeed a way of softening a rude thing when you’re talking about someone, but if someone says “bless your heart” to you, oh, honey. Honey.

That’s a thing—I find myself referring to people of any gender and age as “honey”.

Northerners think white gravy is weird (if they’ve heard of it at all). It’s hard as all get-out to find decent dried pinto beans up here. And y’all Northerners don’t cook with lard. It’s everywhere in the South. Lard and bacon grease. Strangely enough, it’s real hard to find a decent Mexican place in Boston.

Jelly on sausage is totally a thing in my area. It’s almost always grape jelly on sausage, too.

I always try to smile at or chat with campus security, which almost no one else did. I also surprised pretty much every cafeteria/”café” worker on campus by thanking them and wishing them a good day whenever I ordered and received my order.

I cannot for the life of me pronounce “pin” and “pen” differently. It’s all i’s. I know people who say “yallow” instead of yellow, but that’s more rare than the e/i thing.

I’ve also had to learn to ask for things. When you’re at someone’s house, you don’t ask for food or drink. You wait for them to offer it to you. My friends discovered this the first time I meekly requested “some water or something”—after all, I was a guest in their room and I didn’t want to inconvenience them.

My hometown is incredibly Protestant—Southern Baptist, mostly. We have one tiny Catholic church, and according to my parents, there was once a (as in one) Jewish family that lived somewhere in the county, but they moved away a long while ago.

Funerals are huge deals. There’s visitation for two or three days, which include full services, and the funeral itself is like going to Sunday-morning church. Everybody who knows anybody in the family attends. There’s great food, too. Some people still have funerals in the home, though I’ve never been to one. In my 19 years, I have literally lost count of the funerals I’ve been to, and I know some people up here who have only been to close relatives’ funerals.

... now I want to go home, dangit.

Mark Moore
10-08-2013, 07:29 AM
I notice, down here, quite a few locals use "them" for "those". "Them eggs are supposed to be $1.99." It really annoys me. Heck, incorrect grammar in general annoys me, and it's rampant down here.

Also, I don't know if it's a regional thing or what, but I hate it when customers pronounce coupons as "coo-pons" instead of "Q-pons".

King Neptune
10-08-2013, 04:06 PM
I notice, down here, quite a few locals use "them" for "those". "Them eggs are supposed to be $1.99." It really annoys me. Heck, incorrect grammar in general annoys me, and it's rampant down here.

Also, I don't know if it's a regional thing or what, but I hate it when customers pronounce coupons as "coo-pons" instead of "Q-pons".

You are being oversensitive with respects to coupons. There is no qu in that word. I don't believe that it is regional. It seems like some people from all over pick up that quoupons pronunciation.

vagough
10-09-2013, 03:56 PM
Out of curiosity, just checked the dictionary. Both pronunciations are correct, with "koo-pon" being the preferred pronunciation. :)

mamiller512
10-10-2013, 03:29 PM
I'm from Texas originally. My accent has faded to nonexistent other the years from all the state-to-state moving. No matter how many years I have away from there or what state I may live in, I've noticed two things are ever present. If I get drunk, that accent comes roaring back and "y'all" is still a staple in my vocabulary. :D

Another important distinction here is, if you open at 10:00, no one should expect you to unlock the door before 10:15. I've seen it in large fast food chains all the way to small businesses. Not going to happen. LOL

:rolleyes:
Biscuits and gravy sounds good right now.

Cyia
10-11-2013, 12:55 AM
I'm from Texas.

The pronounced lack of Dr. Pepper once you migrate to the more northern states is unacceptable. And no, Mr. Pibb is not the same thing.

Also, I have an "aunt," (sounds like "ant"), but if I address her by name it's Aunt (sounds like a'int), which rhymes with "can't" because most people around here, use the hard A for that word, too.

mamiller512
10-11-2013, 01:03 AM
I'm from Texas.

The pronounced lack of Dr. Pepper once you migrate to the more northern states is unacceptable. And no, Mr. Pibb is not the same thing.

I forgot about the complete disregard the Yankees have for my favorite beverage, the almighty Dr. Pepper. LOL :snoopy:

King Neptune
10-11-2013, 02:32 AM
I'm from Texas.

The pronounced lack of Dr. Pepper once you migrate to the more northern states is unacceptable. And no, Mr. Pibb is not the same thing.


Here in Massachusetts most stores carry Dr Pepper, and people even turn over the stock, so it doesn't go bad.

benbenberi
10-11-2013, 03:41 AM
What lack of Dr. Pepper? I grew up in NY, live in CT, and I've been drinking Dr. Pepper my whole life. Never had any trouble finding it.

Mr. Pibb, OTOH, is entirely unfamiliar to me. (It may have been around all the time, I just never had any reason to notice it.)

bethany
10-11-2013, 04:13 AM
Oh! Speaking of jelly...everytime I go to a fast food place for breakfast and order a breakfast sandwich (McDonalds, Burger King, Arby's,) I get asked if I want jelly. I thought it was just like asking if I wanted ketchup at first, except I kept only having a sandwich---nothing to put jelly on, such as a biscuit or roll. I finally asked the clerk at my local McDonalds why she asked, since I'd only ordered an Egg McMuffin, and she said "Oh, most of the people I know put jelly on their sandwich." With cheese, egg & sausage? Really? :Wha:

Maybe it's just in Texas (or my little part if it). Anyone else from the South care to weigh in on jelly?

I'm from KY and I always get jelly with an egg mcmuffin. I take off the top of the English muffin (too much bread) and eat it open faced and then put the jelly on the top half. I do know a lot of people who put the jelly directly on it, which isn't a completely novel idea. Think monte cristo.

bethany
10-11-2013, 04:18 AM
I’m from eastern Kentucky, and I’m in college in Boston.

First off—Southerners don’t often talk about Northerners. We talk about Yankees.

Iced Lipton ain’t tea. It’s Luzianne all the way down here.

“Bless their heart” is indeed a way of softening a rude thing when you’re talking about someone, but if someone says “bless your heart” to you, oh, honey. Honey.

That’s a thing—I find myself referring to people of any gender and age as “honey”.

Northerners think white gravy is weird (if they’ve heard of it at all). It’s hard as all get-out to find decent dried pinto beans up here. And y’all Northerners don’t cook with lard. It’s everywhere in the South. Lard and bacon grease. Strangely enough, it’s real hard to find a decent Mexican place in Boston.

Jelly on sausage is totally a thing in my area. It’s almost always grape jelly on sausage, too.

I always try to smile at or chat with campus security, which almost no one else did. I also surprised pretty much every cafeteria/”café” worker on campus by thanking them and wishing them a good day whenever I ordered and received my order.

I cannot for the life of me pronounce “pin” and “pen” differently. It’s all i’s. I know people who say “yallow” instead of yellow, but that’s more rare than the e/i thing.

I’ve also had to learn to ask for things. When you’re at someone’s house, you don’t ask for food or drink. You wait for them to offer it to you. My friends discovered this the first time I meekly requested “some water or something”—after all, I was a guest in their room and I didn’t want to inconvenience them.

My hometown is incredibly Protestant—Southern Baptist, mostly. We have one tiny Catholic church, and according to my parents, there was once a (as in one) Jewish family that lived somewhere in the county, but they moved away a long while ago.

Funerals are huge deals. There’s visitation for two or three days, which include full services, and the funeral itself is like going to Sunday-morning church. Everybody who knows anybody in the family attends. There’s great food, too. Some people still have funerals in the home, though I’ve never been to one. In my 19 years, I have literally lost count of the funerals I’ve been to, and I know some people up here who have only been to close relatives’ funerals.

... now I want to go home, dangit.

This is funny, because I'm also from KY (Louisville) and I've never had Luzianne tea, always Lipton. And I've never heard anyone say Yankees referring to anything besides a ball team (or southern people on TV)

We do have white gravy once in awhile!!!

My 9th grade speech teacher stressed the difference between pin and pen and now I can't imagine saying them the same. However, my son's name is Ezra and people are constantly calling him Izra. Not just people from the south.

Funny how things can be different in the same state!

juniper
10-11-2013, 09:53 AM
I'm surprised at the number of Texans identifying as "southern." I lived in Texas for 21 years as an adult - 8 in West Texas, 12 in Austin, and 1 in East Texas.

Only East Texas was kinda considered part of the south and had some of those attributes. West Texas was part of the Southwest USA, and Austin was Heaven. :)

We have a new in-law who's from South Carolina, who recently spent some time with us on vacation. Our family is New England and Out West. She's the first southerner - and she had a hard time of it. We did too. Interregional marriages can be difficult. Not saying anything more about that. :Ssh:

blacbird
10-11-2013, 11:00 AM
The pronounced lack of Dr. Pepper once you migrate to the more northern states is unacceptable.

This comment mystifies me entirely. Dr. Pepper is available everywhere, in every grocery store I've ever been in, from Louisiana to Alaska. I grew up in Iowa and Minnesota, and it was ubiquitous even back then. Still is. Mr. Pibb, on the other hand, I haven't seen anywhere in years?

I do hate 'em both, however. Maybe my upbringing. Gimme a Squirt, anyday.

caw

>compass<
10-11-2013, 11:07 AM
I am not a southerner, but I've somehow adopted several southern habits and preferences. Hell, my name is the one of the most southern names possible for a lady (but I won't post it, sorry. Y'all will just have to guess).

Take "soda" for example. Everyone I know up here says "pop" which drives me bananas because I always want to say, "It's SODA. Soh-Dah. Not (expletive) pop!" I was even asked once if I'm from my home state because I'd asked for orange soda instead of orange pop. Also, Dr. Pepper is the bees knees. I love jelly on my sausage (and maple syrup on my bacon and scrambled eggs, but that may not be a southern thing per se?). I eat grits often. I also say, "Bless their heart" to soften the blow. I make small talk with people all the time and depending on where I am people are either chilly and unresponsive or they open up like they've been desperate for a chat. The whole "people not acknowledging each other on the street" thing really bothers me, too.

Also, I say y'all like it's my job, y'all. I agree with whoever it was who said "y'all" is more elegant than "you guys." "Y'all" is old-timey proper English! What's not to love! :D

mamiller512
10-11-2013, 02:26 PM
I'm surprised at the number of Texans identifying as "southern." I lived in Texas for 21 years as an adult - 8 in West Texas, 12 in Austin, and 1 in East Texas.

Only East Texas was kinda considered part of the south and had some of those attributes. West Texas was part of the Southwest USA, and Austin was Heaven. :)



I'm originally from Austin. (Keep Austin Wierd!)

I agree about not really identifying myself as a Southern. I started to feel like a Southern once I started to move up North and to Cali. Other people identified me as a Southerner and the y'alls kinda sealed the deal in their minds. LOL. I thought, hell, I am from the southern part of the US, so I guess that fits. ;)

Cyia
10-11-2013, 09:35 PM
This comment mystifies me entirely. Dr. Pepper is available everywhere, in every grocery store I've ever been in,

There are a lot of restaurants that don't serve it. They serve Coke products, but not DP.

MostlyBecca
10-11-2013, 10:12 PM
I'm from Texas.

The pronounced lack of Dr. Pepper once you migrate to the more northern states is unacceptable. And no, Mr. Pibb is not the same thing.

Ugh! I so agree. Dr. Pepper is my favorite soda by far and more than half the time in restaurants they tell me they only have coke products. I don't mind Mr. Pibb honestly, it's close enough for me. But a lot of the time the places that say they only have coke products don't even have Mr. Pibb which is a coke product.

Then they ask me if cherry coke is okay :Wha:

Last week someone asked if root beer was okay when I asked for Dr. Pepper. Root beer? Seriously? No just give me a coke... *sigh*

I'm still not sure which is worse about living here. That Dr. Pepper isn't more abundant, or that the closest Bojangles is states away. (I do still really love it here though.)

Lavern08
10-11-2013, 11:01 PM
...Funerals are huge deals. There’s great food, too.

Yes, yes, YES!!!

...And people dress to the nines and some ladies even wear hats and gloves. ;)