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TerzaRima
09-08-2013, 07:36 AM
Two linguists explain how the original pronunciation (http://twentytwowords.com/2013/09/05/performing-shakespeares-plays-with-their-original-english-accent/), which the Globe Theatre now uses in some productions, changes our understanding of the plays. Really interesting.

Scribhneoir
09-08-2013, 11:34 AM
Extremely interesting!

And is it just me or does the original pronunciation sound like Shakespeare as performed on Talk-Like-A-Pirate Day? I would love to see these versions.

AVS
09-08-2013, 12:23 PM
Extremely interesting!

And is it just me or does the original pronunciation sound like Shakespeare as performed on Talk-Like-A-Pirate Day? I would love to see these versions.

Arrr!

ColoradoGuy
09-08-2013, 07:33 PM
Very interesting -- thanks for this.

My mother was a Shakespeare scholar and she used to hold forth about this from time to time at the dinner table.

Madeline Taylor
09-11-2013, 11:44 AM
Awww, love, love, love David Crystal! What a brilliant guy. I did my M.A. thesis on Shakespeare and I generally read at least a bit of Mr. Bill every week. I only wish young people could go past the barriers and delve into the plays. The worlds I find in there always take my breath away... But I have found that even people who studied English tend to steer away from Shakespeare. Which, to my mind, is a sad and depressing fact. :(

Yorkist
09-11-2013, 11:51 AM
Sorry, is this new? I remember hearing about this as an undergraduate ten years ago.

Favorite Shakespeare play is Much Ado About Nothing, for the sake of posterity. Absolutely adore Beatrice and Benedick. I 'ship them hardcore. :)

TerzaRima
09-12-2013, 12:34 AM
It was mostly new to me. I figured it was fine, because I wasn't posting in Critical Theory and Philosophy of Language: Breaking News.

Yorkist
09-12-2013, 12:43 AM
Oh, sorry, Terza. PC&E culture has warped my brain. Also I was legitimately confused. Like, did I dream that? Stranger things have happened.

Mea culpa. Mostly I just wanted to get my Beatrice and Benedick love out there.

TerzaRima
09-12-2013, 12:52 AM
Aw, no worries.

ColoradoGuy
09-12-2013, 06:13 PM
Oh, sorry, Terza. PC&E culture has warped my brain. Also I was legitimately confused. Like, did I dream that? Stranger things have happened.

Mea culpa. Mostly I just wanted to get my Beatrice and Benedick love out there.

A decade or two either way doesn't matter much in this room.

Yorkist
09-12-2013, 07:24 PM
Like I said, Colorado, maybe it's because of PC&E and maybe it's because I've got one foot in academia, but I was just really confused for a minute there. Thought I had an epic case of cerebral flatulence.

Glad that others are getting to know about this though!

RichardGarfinkle
09-12-2013, 07:25 PM
I'm exploiting the derail to post a link to a youtube video my daughter (AW member Stormchord) made humorously summarizing Much Ado About Nothing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-AGIUNsGgA

Yorkist
09-12-2013, 07:54 PM
I'm exploiting the derail to post a link to a youtube video my daughter (AW member Stormchord) made humorously summarizing Much Ado About Nothing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-AGIUNsGgA

Adorable and an apt little summary!

Reziac
11-09-2013, 07:47 PM
I'm exploiting the derail to post a link to a youtube video my daughter (AW member Stormchord) made humorously summarizing Much Ado About Nothing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-AGIUNsGgA

Wonderful!

And next y'all gotta watch the sequel,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NwZl_zGoyw

writingdalloway
07-24-2014, 11:44 AM
great read. Thanks for the link.

PrincessOfCats
10-09-2014, 09:10 PM
This stuff was brand new to me, thank you for posting it!

I ended up going and finding more videos made by the guy in the video you linked, and found an hour and a half long class he taught that put me in a constant state of 'Mind: Blown'. Romeo and Juliet's meeting being a shared sonnet, the way that he makes iambic pentameter canter for Richard III, the way he uses the meter of his verse to tell the actors when to speak and when to pause... the man was such a genius with language. He was a composer whose instrument of choice was actors.

What really stunned me was that some things I did back in my Shakespearean acting days which had been criticized by directors at the time turned out to be right. (Reversing the iambs for Puck's speeches in Midsummer Night's Dream, playing the 'Get Thee to a Nunnery' scene with Hamlet ranting nonstop and Ophelia talking over him, and the 'cantering' rhythm for Richard III's opening speech.) Feeling very in tune with the Bard right now.

Anyway, thank you so much for the link. I learned a lot.