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juniper
07-20-2013, 12:43 AM
No, this didn't happen to me. But I've been wondering if it could, since I recently bought an e-reader (Kobo Mini) and can't find a way to password protect it.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/blog/when-someone-steals-your-nook-and-spends-238-on-erotica/

"When Someone Steals Your NOOK and Spends $238 On Erotica"

... Then my NOOK was stolen at the gym—I had left it on that damn Stairmaster. I didn’t worry about it or report it right away; I thought I might find it. Fortunately, I was awake and on my computer at six in the morning the next day when I started receiving email notifications. TIE ME IS NOW IN YOUR NOOK LIBRARY. SURRENDER YOUR LOVE IS NOW IN YOUR NOOK LIBRARY. By the time I registered what had happened, there were 30 books purchased, and they were rapidly piling on."

She canceled her stored credit card and B&N deleted those specific books and refunded the money - but the thief still has her Nook AND the books she'd purchased before it was stolen. I guess there's no way to transfer those downloaded e-books to a different Nook account - ?

The article is a little huffy about "oh no! not erotica!" but still funny. And a warning I guess.

She said she's discovered a way to password protect the Nook but I still can't find one on my Kobo. If the only way to handle a theft is after the fact - that's a system flaw.

I just tried it and was able to buy a book on the Kobo without entering any account info. And during checkout the Kobo showed me the stored billing address - my home address and phone number - so anyone stealing my Kobo would have that info too.

The only way I've found to protect that info is to delete it from my online Kobo account on my laptop. It let me delete the credit card info but not the billing address, so I changed it to a bogus address and phone number.

So any books I want to buy I'll have to re-enter the info each time. Which is inconvenient. If someone knows how to password protect the Mini, please let me know! Google search gives nothing helpful.

frankiebrown
07-20-2013, 12:50 AM
I don't know about password protecting the Kobo itself, but I can tell you that you can download the Kobo app on your computer, tablet or phone and download your library onto whatever device you've installed the app. And then if your device gets stolen, you can change your account password online. I think if you do that, the thief would have to reenter the new password on the Kobo Mini itself, but I'm not 100% sure.

juniper
07-20-2013, 01:00 AM
Yeah, I changed my account stuff online. So to buy books now on the Kobo I have to enter all the stuff each time. No big deal.

Still, if someone steals your e-reader - or you leave it on the train - there goes your library, I guess. It seems the books can't be deleted from the device and transferred to another account you set up - or at least that's what I gleaned from the article. I could be wrong. :Shrug:

Way worse than just losing one book.

Corussa
07-20-2013, 01:06 AM
Still, if someone steals your e-reader - or you leave it on the train - there goes your library, I guess.


Way worse than just losing one book.

Just what I was thinking! Yet another excuse for me to remain a Luddite and resist the lure of e-readers. :)

Medievalist
07-20-2013, 01:23 AM
iOS devices allow you to bork the data, the account, and various other options related to the device from any computer.

Axordil
07-20-2013, 02:12 AM
All of your Kobo ebooks are cloud-stored. Losing a device does not mean losing the books.

frankiebrown
07-20-2013, 02:38 AM
Still, if someone steals your e-reader - or you leave it on the train - there goes your library, I guess.

No, you just have to download the Kobo app (it's free) onto your computer (or phone or tablet), log into the app with your account info, and you can download your library. Like Axordil said, your library is stored on the cloud. You won't lose your library.

JSSchley
07-20-2013, 02:39 AM
She canceled her stored credit card and B&N deleted those specific books and refunded the money - but the thief still has her Nook AND the books she'd purchased before it was stolen. I guess there's no way to transfer those downloaded e-books to a different Nook account - ?

She said the thief had the nook with the books on it. The books stayed with her account (to go onto a new device), but also stayed downloaded to that device since they had already been downloaded. I don't doubt that customer service deregistered that device from her account, but that doesn't erase it.

AFAIK, all the e-readers are cloud-based. That's one of the advantages, IMO (except for the ever-present problem of DRM). No matter what happens to your device, your library sticks with you.

That said...write down the serial number for all your electronics in a safe place. :)

ULTRAGOTHA
07-20-2013, 02:40 AM
You can also back up your library on a data stick and restore it at any point.

My kindle never speaks to Amazon.

James D. Macdonald
07-20-2013, 03:36 AM
That entry appears to have been erased from the barnesandnoble.com blog.

Namatu
07-20-2013, 04:34 AM
You can password protect the Nook. It was one of the first things I did with mine. Not sure if it can be done with Kobo.

juniper
07-20-2013, 05:58 AM
She said the thief had the nook with the books on it. The books stayed with her account (to go onto a new device), but also stayed downloaded to that device since they had already been downloaded. I don't doubt that customer service deregistered that device from her account, but that doesn't erase it.

AFAIK, all the e-readers are cloud-based. That's one of the advantages, IMO (except for the ever-present problem of DRM). No matter what happens to your device, your library sticks with you.

I wonder if it's that easy? Yes, if I lost my Kobo device, I could still access the books from my account with the Kobo website, or the app.

But would I be able to buy another e-reader and re-load my books onto it? How many times would I be able to do that?

If there's no limit, what would prevent someone from buying an e-reader and loading it up with, saying 40 genre books.

And then buying 20 more e-readers and downloading those same books onto those new e-readers? And then selling them on craigslist or another place:

"New e-reader, preloaded with 40 (mystery, SF, erotica, fantasy, romance) books, yours for $xxx."

Could be a lucrative business model. Buy one e-book, load it onto multiple devices. There must be a limit. Even if it's an honest thing, such as being a klutz and losing more than one Kobo - there must be a limit to how many times an e-book can be downloaded.

What am I missing?
~~~~~
Not surprising that the blog post has been deleted. No one wants to think about losing their books.

frankiebrown
07-20-2013, 06:19 AM
Seems you've found a flaw in the system, juniper.

thothguard51
07-20-2013, 06:21 AM
Unsure about Kobo, but Amazon can remove all books from the Kindles. A owner can also control their Kindle Fire account from their laptop or desktop as well.

If you report your Kindle Fire as stollen, Amazon will freeze the account. You still have the books in the cloud, but the stolen/lost kindle would have the downloaded books removed as soon as the unit is turned on and connected to a wifi.

Its because of this reason, I use passwords on all my electronic devices, and each one has a different password. My Kindle Fire has over 100 books loaded and another 200 or so in the clouds. It also has copies of my stories in the documents file and I sure as hell don't want those to fall into the wrong hands...

thothguard51
07-20-2013, 06:26 AM
Seems you've found a flaw in the system, juniper.

Not really. For the Kindle, each Kindle has an ID number and if you report it stolen or lost, Amazon can lock it up and even remove the contents once it has been connected to a Wifi.

Unsure about other E-readers though...

JSSchley
07-20-2013, 06:34 AM
Not really. For the Kindle, each Kindle has an ID number and if you report it stolen or lost, Amazon can lock it up and even remove the contents once it has been connected to a Wifi.

Unsure about other E-readers though...

B&N can also blacklist and, I think, erase. But they (we? I'm not in this part of nook management) usually just opt for deregistering, assuming that someone will try to register the nook at some point and be required to erase it in order to do so.

And juniper, as to your question about selling multiple devices, there's usually a limit to the number of devices you can use. I've actually hit mine with my nook because I have two nooks, two computers, a phone and an iPad all connected to my account. It won't let me download my library to any new devices.

DancingMaenid
07-20-2013, 11:16 AM
You can also back up your library on a data stick and restore it at any point.

My kindle never speaks to Amazon.

Same here. I save all the books I buy to my computer (and back them up).

I don't even have the wi-fi turned on--I only turned it on once so I could create folders (don't know why you can't do that without an internet connection). Initially, I just didn't get around to it, but after hearing stories about Amazon removing stuff from people's Kindles after they paid for it, I'd rather keep my Kindle disconnected. I just transfer everything via USB.

djf881
07-21-2013, 08:49 AM
You can disconnect the device from your account remotely through the website, and if you call them up, they can process returns of the material that the thief purchased.

Medievalist
07-21-2013, 07:42 PM
What am I missing?

It's too much work and too much risk for too little pay.

The hardware is trackable if it ever logs on.

And it's about thirty seconds to remove the DRM on most ebooks.

Daddyo
07-22-2013, 03:56 AM
I went to a shop to have my tires rotated and took my Kindle Fire along to pass the time. Didn't realize that I left it where I sat until late that night. I fretted about it all night, but didn't take any steps to cancel anything online. Just kept checking to make sure no charges had been generated on my account. I called the shop first thing the next day and a customer had found it and turned it in to management. Learned a lesson there.

Erin Latimer
07-22-2013, 04:02 AM
This one time I left my book at the gym and I was worried that....

No wait...:D

Glad I'm still in the stone ages. ;)

Although I WAS mad I didn't get to finish the story....