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sarahdalton
05-29-2013, 03:11 PM
Hi guys,

Hoping you can help with this one.

In the midst of a battle one of my characters is shot. I've written 'in the chest' for now. I need it to look dramatic so that they might not survive, but for them to survive in the end, even if it's very lucky that they did.

There is no immediate medical care available. She'll have to wait a few hours to get to a hospital.

There is a medic available but I'm not sure what she could do without any equipment.

Would a bullet to the chest be feasible, if it missed vital organs, arteries and the spine? Or would it be better to have the wound elsewhere--abdomen?

Many thanks!

cornflake
05-29-2013, 03:17 PM
You can do whatever you want. Work backwards from what you want to have happen.

Shot in the chest - or abdomen, arm, leg, etc., - can mean anything. It can mean a basically instant fatality if a bullet puts holes in the heart, it can mean a big sucking chest wound with punctured lung(s), it can mean a bullet pinging around and nicking a lung, pericardial sac, lodging in the diaphram, it can mean a bullet stops against a rib and does almost no damage. :Shrug: It's your bullet.

sarahdalton
05-29-2013, 03:21 PM
Okay cool, I just wanted it to check it was possible from a medical point of view. I like the idea of it stopping by a rib. That could give me time.

WeaselFire
05-29-2013, 09:28 PM
In the midst of a battle one of my characters is shot.
Take a look at the myriad of bullet wound posts here. Then come back and ask the specifics. The vast majority of bullet wounds are survivable.

By the way, a Tampon is a perfect bullet-wound bandage. Most torso wounds that do not impact a major artery or the spinal system are survivable when blood loss is controlled. :)

Jeff

Kaarl
05-30-2013, 06:40 AM
By the way, a Tampon is a perfect bullet-wound bandage. Most torso wounds that do not impact a major artery or the spinal system are survivable when blood loss is controlled

My uncle took some with him when he went on Peacekeeping duty. I was about seven and vividly remember this because they were for ladies and seeing a soldier packing them was strange.

Note: I'm not sure if the winged ones would be any good, my uncle had the other ones :D

cornflake
05-30-2013, 07:03 AM
My uncle took some with him when he went on Peacekeeping duty. I was about seven and vividly remember this because they were for ladies and seeing a soldier packing them was strange.

Note: I'm not sure if the winged ones would be any good, my uncle had the other ones :D

Winged tampons? They take flight?!

ebbrown
05-30-2013, 07:22 AM
Winged tampons? They take flight?!

Awesome!
That reminds me of the time I was the walk-in triage nurse and a young gang-banger came in with a gsw to his calf. He was crying and asking if he was gonna die...so I looked in my drawer and saw I was out of bandages, but had a couple nice puffy maxi pads.
He kept thanking me for stopping the bleeding, and we had a nice laugh as I wheeled him into the back, his leg propped up with a mound of sanitary napkins over the wound.
Hehe

James simpson
05-30-2013, 08:53 AM
Getting back to the topic, it depends on the gun type and the range the character gets shot at. If the character gets shot with a shotgun at point blank range in the chest, they are screwed.

If the bullet is going to stop at the rib it needs to be shot from a fair distance otherwise the rib will just break and cause even more problems. Puncturing a lung is survivable for quite a while. A good example of that is in the movie Three Kings.

sarahdalton
05-30-2013, 10:58 AM
Awesome!
That reminds me of the time I was the walk-in triage nurse and a young gang-banger came in with a gsw to his calf. He was crying and asking if he was gonna die...so I looked in my drawer and saw I was out of bandages, but had a couple nice puffy maxi pads.
He kept thanking me for stopping the bleeding, and we had a nice laugh as I wheeled him into the back, his leg propped up with a mound of sanitary napkins over the wound.
Hehe

That story made me chuckle, especially seeing as gang-banger means something completely different in Britain!

Right I think I'll have a dig around the forum see what other information I can find. Thanks!

Muppster
05-30-2013, 05:21 PM
This (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=8174206&postcount=12) might help you pick the appropriate wound to meet your survival time/mobility needs?

sarahdalton
05-30-2013, 05:47 PM
Muppster, before I click on that link would you mind summarising the content? I only ask because I'm really quite squeamish and images of wounds are likely to upset my lunch. :)

WeaselFire
05-30-2013, 06:14 PM
Note: I'm not sure if the winged ones would be any good, my uncle had the other ones :D
Pads make great trauma bandages too. And condoms keep dirt out of rifle barrels.

The bonus of packing tampons and pads in a first aid kit is that the ladies appreciate the thoughtfulness of the man. :)

Jeff

WeaselFire
05-30-2013, 06:15 PM
Muppster, before I click on that link would you mind summarising the content? I only ask because I'm really quite squeamish and images of wounds are likely to upset my lunch. :)
No images or anything in the post linked to. Just info to Google.

:)

Jeff

Muppster
05-30-2013, 06:18 PM
Heh, didn't even think. Relax, no gory pics (though I know a site if you're interested...). It's just pointing at a previous thread on a similar theme because I'm too lazy to type it all again.

There's some research from the 60s about incapacitation of soldiers. Sperazza & Kokinakis looked at bullets & shrapnel injuries, Bowman did something similar with blast (pressure waves from explosives). The papers don't have that kind of pictures either. Just a lot of stuff about the probability that given you're hit by Something, it hits an Important part of you, and how long it takes to cause incapacitation. Where Important and incapacitation is defined by what you're trying to do (running, just using your arms so meh, who cares about your leg, lols).

They have graphs/tables that can pick a weapon/timescale/activity and see the probability of injury to different bodyparts resulting in death/incapacitation. Good ball-park figure for about how serious a wound is.

Trebor1415
05-30-2013, 09:06 PM
There have been several threads on this question recently. If you search and find them they might have info that will help you as well.

kellycoinguy
06-04-2013, 10:01 AM
Hi guys,

Hoping you can help with this one.

In the midst of a battle one of my characters is shot. I've written 'in the chest' for now. I need it to look dramatic so that they might not survive, but for them to survive in the end, even if it's very lucky that they did.

There is no immediate medical care available. She'll have to wait a few hours to get to a hospital.

There is a medic available but I'm not sure what she could do without any equipment.

Would a bullet to the chest be feasible, if it missed vital organs, arteries and the spine? Or would it be better to have the wound elsewhere--abdomen?

Many thanks!

Even a pretty large gaping chest wound can be treated for a couple of hours with, wait for it, a baby diaper stuck into the wound to stop the bleeding. They expand into the wound, and are good at getting things to clot up and stop the bleeding. So, if you think carrying a tampon around is bad, try a baby diaper. Also duct tape is good for securing the diaper in place. In Canada, people in traffic accidents in remote places occasionally arrive at the ER with duct tape and diapers holding them together until they can travel the hours to the nearest ER, at least that's what my ex told me, and she told me that she was an ER nurse up there. Of course, she was really good at telling stories, but that one seemed somewhat believable anyway... LOL

Lidiya
06-04-2013, 12:04 PM
In quite a few books I've read and movies someone tears off their shirt and ties it around the wound...that might be something to think about if they're not carrying tampons and diapers into the battle :D

But, uh, very interesting info in this thread. I might need it some day, haha.

Mariana
06-04-2013, 06:20 PM
If we supposed that the gunshot provoked a punctured lung, does anyone know what happens next? I mean, what about the first aid, time left to go to the hospital and what happens in the surgery? How can someone survive from a punctured lung?

LoneRider
06-04-2013, 06:59 PM
If the individual wore body armor that can change a lot, to the point that it could simply be a set of bruises versus serious wounds. Is this in modern times?

Trebor1415
06-05-2013, 01:41 AM
If we supposed that the gunshot provoked a punctured lung, does anyone know what happens next? I mean, what about the first aid, time left to go to the hospital and what happens in the surgery? How can someone survive from a punctured lung?

Google "Sucking chest wound" and "sucking chest wound treatment" and you should get some good info.

At a minimum, it's bad, at worse it's fatal. Treatment needs to start at the scene and continue through surgery and hospitalization.

I'm not going to get into all the specifics of treatment, because I don't know them all, but here's one interesting tidbit - When a gunshot causes a sucking chest wound part of the immediate first aid is to apply a dressing on the chest over the hole. The dressing needs to be non-permable (not gauze, but more like plastic) and it needs to be taped so that one end remains free. This allows air to escape the lung.

Google up and you'll get more info.