PDA

View Full Version : Missing Person in the EU



citymouse
05-23-2013, 01:08 AM
Does anyone know how long one must wait before a missing person report can be filed in Spain / EU?

Google isn't helping me today!
Thanks,
C

mirandashell
05-23-2013, 01:17 AM
In Spain or in Europe in general?

citymouse
05-23-2013, 01:27 AM
Spain in particular, but since Spain is in the EU, I'm guessing the law that would apply is the same for all EU members. However, I may be mistaken about that.


In Spain or in Europe in general?

mirandashell
05-23-2013, 01:33 AM
Yeah, that is something that would need checking. Some laws are Europe-wide and some aren't so research is necessary.

Kaarl
05-23-2013, 04:46 AM
You do not have to wait a certain amount of time to file a missing persons report, unless you are a character in a TV show/movie.

If you believe someone is missing you can contact the police (except maybe in some backwards country run by a dictator) as soon as you suspect it. That is why they have laws for wasting police time.

Does "please come back in three days, if they are STILL missing then we will do something about it" sound like something an officer could say to a mother who walks out of a busy market after two hours of searching and is still missing her three year old girl ?

They may not make it a priority until have more details or they are certain it isn't miscommunication or something but its a case by case basis for that decision, regardless of country.

Buffysquirrel
05-23-2013, 04:04 PM
I doubt the EU has laws covering missing persons. More likely it would be left to the discretion of member countries. I also doubt that Spain changed its policy on missing persons the day after Franco died, although I suppose it may have made that a priority.

Is this person a Spanish national? EU national? Visitor, resident?

mirandashell
05-23-2013, 04:06 PM
Kaarl - I think it can depend on who is missing. Small children are a different priority to a 30 year old.

Kaarl
05-25-2013, 07:12 PM
Kaarl - I think it can depend on who is missing. Small children are a different priority to a 30 year old.

I was under the impression that the priority only affected WHEN they started looking. I thought that the actual reporting (regardless of age) could occur at any time.

I did have an extensive search on Google (including not for profits as well as .gov sites) before my last post and this seemed to be the case for the EU countries I could find (and understand) the policy for.

Buffysquirrel
05-25-2013, 10:08 PM
Certainly in the UK you can report at any time. But as you say, children will be prioritised. Well, certain children will at certain times. It's amazingly patchy, really.

Steve Collins
05-26-2013, 06:47 PM
I have to say in the UK you can report a MISPER at any time. Priority is given to children and vulnerable adults i.e Mentally ill, alzheimers, etc. Other than that to be honest very little is done there simply isn't the manpower to go out looking. In my experience the MISPER report sits in a ring binder and is removed if they turn up, alive or otherwise. It really is a misnomer that the police start an investigation into MISPERS.

Mr Flibble
05-27-2013, 04:41 AM
I have to say in the UK you can report a MISPER at any time. Priority is given to children and vulnerable adults i.e Mentally ill, alzheimers, etc. Other than that to be honest very little is done there simply isn't the manpower to go out looking. In my experience the MISPER report sits in a ring binder and is removed if they turn up, alive or otherwise. It really is a misnomer that the police start an investigation into MISPERS.

Also (kids and mentally ill aside, because..well you'll see), unless there is reason to suspect anything, people are assumed to have gone missing under their own volition. Why waste man hours on a guy who just left his wife, an 18 yo who decided she can't stand her parents etc. It means some fall through the cracks, but how many 'missing' adults are actually missing as opposed to left? However if you have grounds for them being missing as opposed to having left, it'll be investigated, though it'll be low priority unless there's evidence of foul play. But for an adult, they won't usually (again unless you have 'circumstances') start looking till they've been gone 24 hours.*


*From what my local nice policeyman tells me.

ETA: This is the UK. I've lived in Spain. They are..more laid back about things. Including looking for people. But that's just anecdotal.

citymouse
05-29-2013, 02:51 PM
Thanks everyone. I'm writing a situation where two adults are traveling together in Malaga. Unknown to one party, the other is a covert agent. Mister agent gets pulled for an assignment, leaving no explanation. The other guy has no idea what's going on. Both are US citizens. After no cooperation from the laid back local police. Mister bewildered goes to the US consulate. As you can imagine, things go from confused to hair on fire pretty quickly. :)

Buffysquirrel
05-29-2013, 05:47 PM
I would think that agent would get fired pretty quickly. He can't send an email or a text message explaining that his aunty's sick?

citymouse
05-29-2013, 09:30 PM
I agree. But the poor sod who gets left behind with no explanation has to get pretty upset. I mean how often does the average person traveling in a foreign land come home and find that a traveling companion of some weeks is gone?
My natural instinct would be to do a personal search; place we went, etc. After a day, I probably contact the police. As we've discussed, the Spanish police aren't likely to drop everything to look for an able bodied adult, especially a non-Spaniard.



I would think that agent would get fired pretty quickly. He can't send an email or a text message explaining that his aunty's sick?