PDA

View Full Version : Handwriting Discussion



SuspiciousCookie
05-05-2013, 08:35 PM
So, people, let's start a discussion about handwriting. Occasion is that I've recently (just today, actually) started my challenge to improve my handwriting. It was awful before, so since a year or so I've strictly written in block letters. And today, for some awkward reason I don't even know, I have decided to practice my cursive handwriting using several articles on the internet I found.

First thing I noticed was that I, apparently, had been doing it wrong all along. I had been utilizing minimal muscle activities on my shoulder and forearm, and instead had been concentrating on finger & wrist movements. You're supposed to do it the other way around. Another thing is that I'd hold the pen right between the thumb and index finger (which is not wrong, per se), but the "best" way to do it is supposed to be to hold the pen just short of the last knuckle on your index finger.

I am trying to apply both of these things to my writing now. It feels really awkward, but I can also really see the difference it makes. I'm guessing it won't take too long until I'm a pro at calligraphy, yo! D: Other than trying to get used to this, there are two other problems I have right now concerning handwriting.

1. Is your arm supposed to be in the air at all times? 'Cause I just can't get it to stay on the desk if I want to be using my shoulder girdle. It might just be a matter of practice though.

2. It's been so long since I last wrote cursive letters that I have kinda forgotten how some of these work. Then I'd use block letters instead, which destroys the flow entirely. I'm currently struggling with the 't' and 'f', for example. But I'd guess that is also just a matter of practice. I don't want to use the standard D'Nealian style now. I want to create my own style! ... Which, maybe, I should postpone to a point when I can actually write properly in the first place.

Anyway, what about you guys? Are you the standard "probably-doing-it-wrong-but-just-don't-care" type or do you possess the most elegant font you've ever seen?

Ah, yes, before I forget, I used this guide (http://www.paperpenalia.com/handwriting.html) to find out what I'd been doing wrong.

And if you're feeling really confident today, post a picture of your handwriting! I'd be very interested in seeing the way you guys (and ladies) write.

Cheers,
Cookie

Chris P
05-05-2013, 08:50 PM
You could break my fingers and my handwriting would get better.

I did relearn cursive in grad school, though. I don't know why, it just seemed like something I might want to do.

Brightdreamer
05-05-2013, 09:07 PM
I had been utilizing minimal muscle activities on my shoulder and forearm, and instead had been concentrating on finger & wrist movements. You're supposed to do it the other way around.

That makes sense - it's the same with art. Big lines and motions are supposed to flow from the shoulder; finger and wrist action is for the fine details. (I rarely have a big enough workspace to put this into practice, though... and my sketching suffers for it.)

My handwriting has always been terrible, to the point I can't even read it most of the time. I keep meaning to work on it, but haven't found the motivation to get started yet.

BTW, that's an interesting link! Thanks for posting it!

Liralen
05-05-2013, 09:44 PM
Mine tends to change with my mood and the writing instrument. With a fountain pen, it's flowing and almost archaic. With a ballpoint it's generic scratch. Rollerballs are somewhere in between.

Mostly I use a keyboard now, but I do keep some handwritten journals, mostly of tarot, dreams, thoughts and ideas for writing that come to me when I'm AFK, like a long drive and I have to pull over and write it down before it disappears into the ether.

I tend to hold a pen or pencil similarly to fig. 3 in the link, which probably explains the archaic writing.

Lavern08
05-06-2013, 01:17 AM
So, people, let's start a discussion about handwriting.

Mine isn't...

Oh look, a snickerdoodle. :tongue

LA*78
05-06-2013, 01:39 AM
I can write (cursive) if I have to. For day to day I have developed my own style which is a mix between print and cursive. I've never been very neat at either, but it is generally legible.

I was in the last year that was taught the old 'bat and ball' style writing. Since then they changed to a script based on wedges with entry and exit points for printing. Cursive is then simply a matter of joining the exit of one letter with the entry point of the next. Personally I think it is butt ugly and much prefer the loopy style I was taught ;)

Cliff Face
05-06-2013, 04:59 AM
I tend to hold a pen or pencil similarly to fig. 3 in the link, which probably explains the archaic writing.

Umm, I don't hold my pen like any of those pictures...

Basically, I use all but my pinky finger attached to the pen, wrist dragging along the paper like a literate caveman.

I've always written this way. My handwriting was really neat in primary school, so they figured they wouldn't force me to do it the "proper" way. And it remained neat until I stopped having to handwrite things.

I spent a number of years doing very little handwriting, and now that I'm back at Uni taking notes... Well, it's messy. But I don't really care. I can still write, I can usually read what I've written, I've never had a phone call from a professor saying, "Umm, about your handwriting on the exam... What was this word? And the rest of them?"

I vastly prefer typing. It's faster, I can fix typos without having to scribble out a letter or entire word (and yes, I make typos when handwriting, because my brain goes at a different speed to my hand), I can cut and paste sections to rearrange my thoughts, and it doesn't hurt me at all. I can type 10,000 words in a day and not have sore hands/wrists/fingers. Handwriting 1000 words will give me sore all of that stuff if I do it too fast.

I have no intention of learning to pretty up my handwriting. Apart from exams, nobody will ever see my handwriting. *shrug* So long as I can read it, it doesn't bother me.

calieber
05-06-2013, 05:31 AM
I pay my rent with a paper check, and I had to fill out a form this morning, and I pretty much never handwrite anything otherwise. I am trying to keep a journal, though, and I'm doing that by hand.

crunchyblanket
05-06-2013, 02:29 PM
My handwriting is beyond appalling. If I really try hard, it can be neat, but most of the time it's a scrawly mess. It's only got worse since my arthritis kicked in.

Weird thing is, my handwriting is a lot neater in hiragana. Perhaps because the characters are less familiar to me.

Ambrosia
05-06-2013, 04:54 PM
I use cursive all the time because I create on paper before transferring what I have created into the computer and cursive is easier than printing. My printing is not that great and takes more time than cursive so I only use it for forms that say "print" here. My writing is generally legible and, if I am trying to make it legible for anyone else, it is considered "nice"--whatever that means. I have been told I have "pretty" handwriting when people glance at my paper as I am creating and people wish their handwriting was as good as mine. I think the people praising me are just blowing smoke up my skirt cause in those moments I am not really trying to be neat. :D

In the images of how people hold pens in the article linked in the OP, I think the way I hold my pen is closer to image 3 than image 1. I try to keep my hand relaxed because I have learned if you don't your hand cramps up. That is very uncomfortable and not conducive to finishing whatever it is you are working on at the moment.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-06-2013, 05:09 PM
I used to write all my manuscripts by hand then type them... and retype them... and re-retype them. No computers back in my day. My handwriting was acceptable and readable.

Now... after growing old with computers... I write like a doctor.

JulianneQJohnson
05-06-2013, 06:54 PM
I have the handwriting of an ax murderer. But despite it's ugliness, it's very legible.

KellyAssauer
05-09-2013, 04:16 PM
Of course I do it correctly!
There isn't anything I don't do correctly.
Did someone complain?
Who?
Who complained?
I want names dammit! ;)

Liralen
05-09-2013, 09:42 PM
Oddly, when choosing from the jury pool for trial, one of the things we'd look at is the jurors' handwriting. Each juror writes out their name, address and a bit of information and the attorneys on each side are given copies. It can be helpful with the voir dire process.

JustKia
05-09-2013, 10:15 PM
I can write nicely but I have to slow down to do so and usually when I'm putting pen to paper I'm being quick thus I end up with chicken scratches.
I also find my writing changes with my mood as well my writing instrument. I typically hold a pen somewhat like fig 3 - my pen tends to rest just behind the knuckle rather than on the knuckle. That said I do flip to the holding the pen between my first two fingers - much more relaxed in the hand and lighter on the paper but it tends to make my writing taller and narrower (not illegibly so).

Chasing the Horizon
05-09-2013, 10:34 PM
I can write quickly, but only I can read it (well, sometimes even I can't). I only know how to print, though. Cursive seems like the most pointless thing in the 21st Century. It's harder to read than printing (hence all those forms that specify you must print) and harder to learn. Unless you want to learn it as an art form, surely it's more relevant to spend your time improving your typing.

Brightdreamer
05-10-2013, 02:48 AM
Cursive seems like the most pointless thing in the 21st Century. It's harder to read than printing (hence all those forms that specify you must print) and harder to learn. Unless you want to learn it as an art form, surely it's more relevant to spend your time improving your typing.

I recall reading somewhere that, with the elimination of cursive in schools, a generation of college students was running into real trouble when it came to studying older documents... such as period letters, diaries, journals, and trivial stuff like the Declaration of Independence (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/07/Us_declaration_independence.jpg). (Or am I the only one who thinks it's a little disturbing that it's considered perfectly acceptable when one cannot read the original founding documents of one's own country?)

Cliff Face
05-10-2013, 02:55 AM
Learning how to read cursive doesn't necessarily mean you have to learn to write it.

Brightdreamer
05-10-2013, 03:12 AM
Learning how to read cursive doesn't necessarily mean you have to learn to write it.

Evidently, they stopped even teaching how to read it... and where's the incentive to learn, when you aren't practicing by writing? (But, then, I remember learning to read and write printing more or less at the same time, one activity reinforcing the other... same as I remember learning to read and write cursive.)