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Orianna2000
05-04-2013, 08:05 AM
Is there a safe way of using a flamethrower indoors, without burning the building down? Like, can they make the flames shorter? Can they use one that doesn't shoot burning fuel, but rather, just flames? (My research suggests there are some that use gas instead of liquid fuel, but it was a bit confusing.)

My guys are using flamethrowers to keep an alien fog at bay. They're trapped in a basement bomb shelter, and when they're ready to leave, they send a volunteer outside. Right now, I have them shoot a flamethrower through the open doorway to keep the fog from entering the bomb shelter, while the volunteer ducks outside. But then it occurred to me that the flamethrower might just set the basement walls on fire, especially if it's shooting liquid fuel. Obviously, I don't want to burn down the building, so I need to know if there's a way of making it safer.

If I must I rewrite the scene, I suppose they could go upstairs to the street level before using the flamethrower, instead of setting fire to the basement hallway. But that would require changing things so the fog doesn't penetrate the building, which would make their retreat into the bomb shelter pointless. I don't want to rewrite the entire scene, but I need events to be plausible. If it makes a difference, they're in modern-day London.

Any help, here?

Trebor1415
05-04-2013, 08:23 AM
In general, flamethrowers are best used outdoors. However, if your operator is good, and is actually in the doorway, I think he could shoot out without igniting the room.

Read the wiki link and check out these videos. They may help.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flamethrower

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZXUYEdSNhY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNu0sR89_BM

Orianna2000
05-04-2013, 08:25 AM
Just to clarify, they're in a room in an office building's subbasement, shooting out into the hallway. I'm most concerned with the opposite wall of the hallway, where the flames might strike.

everywriter
05-04-2013, 08:30 AM
Well, I will tell you a very true story that happened to me. I don't know if this will help, but it is very true. When I first moved into my house my son, who was 2 at the time dropped the base to the razor into my toilet. Now at the time I had no money. To go out and buy a new one wasn't something I was thinking about (I didn't know you could buy one for like $100). I was young and stupid.

I began to try to get the base of this razor out of the toilet. It was about the same exact size of the hole in the toilet, and it wouldn't come out! I took the toilet to the garage and tried everything. I had all kinds of drills, a saw, even a kinda of spinning grinder. Nothing worked on this thing, and no matter how many times I put a pair of pliers on the thing, I could not pull it out, at some point, it was a kinda late at night, and I had a couple of drinks which gave me the inspiration to use...fire! The base of the razor was made of a very hard plastic. So I filled the toilet with gasoline stood back and lit it. Now I don't know about a flame thrower (military style) but see this toilet was rocking back and forth, and every time it would rock back enough air would get in their and a flame about 12 feet long would shoot out and blast against the ceiling of the garage. It did this about 4 times. It did not burn anything. Nothing caught fire. Might not be what you are looking for, but it's all I got on this one.

It did not work by the way. Fire did turn out to be the key though, I used a more controlled burn...sterno.

blacbird
05-04-2013, 08:58 AM
Is there a safe way of using a flamethrower indoors, without burning the building down?

I'll hazard an opinion:

NO.

Flamethrowers don't throw flame. They spurt ignited liquid fuel.

caw

Orianna2000
05-04-2013, 09:11 AM
So I filled the toilet with gasoline stood back and lit it. Now I don't know about a flame thrower (military style) but see this toilet was rocking back and forth, and every time it would rock back enough air would get in their and a flame about 12 feet long would shoot out and blast against the ceiling of the garage. It did this about 4 times. It did not burn anything. Nothing caught fire. Might not be what you are looking for, but it's all I got on this one.

That's interesting! Still, if it's shooting liquid fuel that ignites as it leaves the device, it might be a different story, as the fuel might splatter over the wall, catching it on fire. This is why I'm wondering if gas flamethrowers might be safer.



Flamethrowers don't throw flame. They spurt ignited liquid fuel.

Which is precisely why I mentioned the possibility of using gas flamethrowers in my OP. Presumably, if they shoot ignited gas it wouldn't be as likely to catch the walls on fire. Still dangerous, but perhaps less so than a liquid fuel flamethrower. But I wanted an expert's opinion to be sure.

King Neptune
05-04-2013, 04:28 PM
Using a flamethrower in an enclosed space has a huge potential for causing great damage. If the flame touches flammable things only briefly, then things may not ignite, and I men briefly. If fuel gets on the flammable things, then they are almost surely gone. The kind of fuel would make little difference.

You are writing fiction, so you can do as you wish, but don't experiment at home.

thothguard51
05-04-2013, 04:48 PM
Why use a flamethrower on fog? All a flamethrower is going to do is light up an area within the fog. Flames do not repel fog...

jclarkdawe
05-04-2013, 05:41 PM
Short answer is it depends. Factors include type of flamethrower, fire load (for instance, a basement might have cement walls -- i.e., very low fire load), space, sprinkler system, radiant heat dangers, and probably quite a few others.

I'd look at the specs for agricultural flamethrowers (see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDpeHp_98zQ for example). Cement or cinder block walls will help a lot. But I think any size that is safe is not going to be strong enough to force fog back. What you're going to be trying to do is generate sufficient air currents to force the fog away from you, and I think you're going to need a powerful flamethrower to accomplish that.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Bufty
05-04-2013, 06:02 PM
Won't anything with a jet simply create currents that re-cycle the fog?

jclarkdawe
05-04-2013, 07:25 PM
Won't anything with a jet simply create currents that re-cycle the fog?

I'm not sure what the OP is hoping to accomplish here.

But anything that creates air currents, such as a fan, water spray, jet, flame thrower, can be used to force fog or smoke away from an area. It doesn't get rid of the fog or smoke, just re-arranges it. I think that's what the OP is hoping to accomplish here, but I'm not sure.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Russell Secord
05-04-2013, 08:15 PM
Another consideration with any indoor flame is that it will use up a lot of oxygen. Depending on how well ventilated the place is, your characters may pass out from smoke inhalation or hypoxia before the air gets fresh again.

kaitie
05-04-2013, 08:23 PM
Well, it is an alien fog. Maybe it's alive and doesn't like fire? And if that's the case, what about homemade torches instead? Then you have the fun torch is gonna go out suspense element to add to it, right?

Parametric
05-04-2013, 08:28 PM
This thread intrigues me greatly. :D

Orianna2000
05-04-2013, 09:30 PM
It is an alien fog that feeds on human blood, so they're trying to burn it, but it doesn't work out as they'd hoped. It retreats from the flame only because it hurts, and once they run out of fuel, the fog pushes forward again. In the end, they starve it until it's weakened and then they drop chemical incendiaries on it to destroy it.

Unfortunately, the basement is not cinder block, it's designed just like the rest of the office building, with painted walls, carpeted floors, and florescent lights overhead. I could say that he deliberately makes his flame bursts short, so as not to strike the opposite wall, but there will end up being scorch marks anyway.

This whole thing bugs me, because the entire subplot hinges on them using flamethrowers and being trapped in the basement. It's like a house of cards: I can't remove one aspect without everything else falling apart.

King Neptune
05-04-2013, 09:34 PM
The Blob but gaseous instead of being gelatinous? Didn't fire kill the Blob?

Amadan
05-04-2013, 09:38 PM
This whole thing bugs me, because the entire subplot hinges on them using flamethrowers and being trapped in the basement. It's like a house of cards: I can't remove one aspect without everything else falling apart.



Besides the fact that yes, it's going to be really hard to use flamethrowers inside without setting the place on fire, also keep in mind that fire sucks up a lot of oxygen. I hope that basement has plenty of air circulation (which will compound the "controlled burn" problem) or your characters will suffocate if they don't set themselves on fire.

Amadan
05-04-2013, 09:40 PM
The Blob but gaseous instead of being gelatinous? Didn't fire kill the Blob?


No way, they froze it with fire extinguishers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Blob) and then dropped it in the Antarctic!

Orianna2000
05-04-2013, 10:07 PM
They're in a bomb shelter with an air circulation filter/thing. Sorry, my mind isn't working clearly, I only had two hours of sleep last night. At any rate, there's a fan overhead to keep air circulating, so that should be plausible, I'm hoping.

I was totally inspired by the original Blob and didn't even realize it! I loved that movie as a kid. Scared the heebie jeebies out of me, but I loved it. That must be where I got the idea for the fog.

King Neptune
05-04-2013, 10:30 PM
No way, they froze it with fire extinguishers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Blob) and then dropped it in the Antarctic!

Thanks, I couldn't quite remember it.

Maybe that would work for this alien fog.

Orianna2000
05-04-2013, 10:35 PM
Maybe that would work for this alien fog.

Actually . . . not for the killing of the fog, but just to hold it back while the volunteer runs outside, fire extinguishers might work better than a flamethrower. Less risk of killing everyone!

The question is, how feasible is it that an ordinary fire extinguisher (of the type used in the UK) would repel an alien fog long enough for them to open the door and slip out? Would the chemicals in the extinguisher hurt the fog? Freeze it so it can't move, temporarily? Hmmm.

kaitie
05-04-2013, 11:07 PM
Well, it's alien, right? So theoretically it could hurt it if you wanted, right?

I think people could run through a door awfully quick if they had to. How many are there?

Ooh, ooh! Sprinklers! You could use the flame thrower, catch the wall on fire, and the sprinklers go off and put the fire out!

jclarkdawe
05-04-2013, 11:31 PM
A fire extinguisher wouldn't bother a fog any more then a flame thrower.

I'd think of a CO2 extinguisher. It's cold enough to cause frostbite, and removes oxygen from the air. It's available in England (red with a black panel over the instructions). About a minutes worth of materials if you keep the trigger down. Between the frostbite temperature and the lack of oxygen in its path, I'm sure you could argue that your fog would be bothered.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Dave Hardy
05-05-2013, 01:03 AM
I'd be wary of using a flamethrower indoors personally. Flamethrowers were designed to get people to leave structures, specifically bunkers. The modern sort (I'm leaving aside Greek fire devices used in Ancient or Medieval times) cropped up in WWI where they needed innovative devices to deal with assaulting entrenched foes who were more or less invulnerable to gunfire.

The classic example of use bu US forces is in the Pacific where flamethrowers were employed to flush Japanese troops out of bunkers or caves. The flamethrower team works up to the bunker with support from rifles or grenades. They spray the bunker with flame. The Japanese exit and get gunned down.

But there is a solution! US forces also employed flamethrower tanks. Obviously the tank is enclosed, but the jet, the spray nozzle is on the outside of the tank. The system is enclosed so the tank crew is not exposed. They were still in use in Vietnam, I think they were called "zippos" after the lighter.

So, I can think of a couple of of scenarios (or more, I'm just thinking outloud), the protagonists build an ingenious flamethrower. Someone says, "Hey here comes that gosh-durned fog through the door."
"Don't worry I'll get it with my home-made flamethrower!"
Hilarity ensues.

Or, the heroes build a nozzle that protrudes from their defensive position and sprays the fog as it rolls in, but does not jet fire into the structure. Cheers all around.

But wait, fogs creep in on little cat feet! What if part of the fog sneaks around back while everybody is fixed on the fireworks up front!? Duhn-duhn DUHN!!!

Anyway, I think you get the idea. I like a bit of flamethrower action in a story.

King Neptune
05-05-2013, 01:07 AM
Actually . . . not for the killing of the fog, but just to hold it back while the volunteer runs outside, fire extinguishers might work better than a flamethrower. Less risk of killing everyone!

Yes, killing all of your characters would not help the story.


The question is, how feasible is it that an ordinary fire extinguisher (of the type used in the UK) would repel an alien fog long enough for them to open the door and slip out? Would the chemicals in the extinguisher hurt the fog? Freeze it so it can't move, temporarily? Hmmm.

I would think that there are CO2 fire extinguishers in the UK, and those put out a cloud of cold CO2. It's your alien fog, so you can determine whether it would notice a cloud of cold CO2. If it were my alien fog, then it would work exactly as I wanted it to work.

Remember that people will suffocate in CO2, especially in a basement. CO2 is heavier than air. Molecular weight about 40, while nitrogen is 28 and oxygen is 32. weights are rounded.

Russell Secord
05-05-2013, 01:43 AM
One way to get rid of a gaseous creature might be to create a vacuum, or at least an area of lower pressure, and pull it into a space that you could seal off.

For a related tactic, someone could reverse the A/C flow. If it's a heat pump, adjusting the thermostat to a higher setting would pump air out instead of in.

If it's alive, someone might find a compound that would kill or repel it. They'd have to come up with a way to spread the compound.

jkenton
05-05-2013, 07:46 AM
A propane brush-burner might work, but it'll have a very, very short range compared to a flame thrower.

debirlfan
05-05-2013, 08:39 AM
Instead of a flame thrower, perhaps your characters can use something that they find in the basement. As mentioned, maybe a fire extinguisher. How about cleaning chemicals? Bleach? Drain cleaner? Maybe they try throwing a couple things at it before they find something that works? Maybe something really unexpected - like the toner out of the copy machine?

Orianna2000
05-05-2013, 06:37 PM
They don't really have the opportunity to experiment with different things. They're locked in a fallout shelter, so they don't have access to anything in the rest of the basement. Once they open the door, they've only got a few seconds before the fog will enter and kill them all. They develop a vaccine that will prevent the fog from feeding on them, and that's what they're testing when they send a volunteer outside the bunker. Only one guy is going out to test it, so they only need to keep the fog at bay for a few seconds.

I can't believe I was so stupid as to think using a flamethrower indoors would work without killing everyone. Major brain fart, there.

A brush burner could definitely work, as it would have the short range necessary to not burn the building down. But I'm not sure why they would have one on hand. It's not a common weapon, and they're in a commercial office building, so I can't think of a reason they'd have one. I'll have to figure this out. I'm still leaning toward the fire extinguisher, if I can technobabble my way through it. It has to sound plausible enough to work. Like . . . it freezes the fog's base molecules, rendering it harmless for a few seconds until it thaws. That doesn't sound too bad.

kaitie
05-05-2013, 09:25 PM
I think a torch could still possibly work if they're in an office building. As long as they have fuel of some sort, they could make one out of whatever's there. Break off a table leg and wrap a shirt around it, put some fuel from the generator on it and light. If they don't like fire, then the volunteer can hold the torch and the rest could stand back. The torch might be enough to keep them away from him while he goes through the doorway, and depending on the fuel it could go out pretty quickly, leaving him exposed on the other side.

Fire extinguisher would definitely be handy, though. There would definitely be one lying around, and it would give them a few seconds to break through.

jkenton
05-06-2013, 05:30 PM
If the fallout shelter had been doubling as storage for the cleaning service or maybe landscaper, a brush-burner isn't that far out of the ballpark of reality. Leaf blowers, assorted cleaning products, obsolete office equipment. Even stuff shipped in from other sites that was just thrown into the shelter for lack of space elsewhere...

WeaselFire
05-06-2013, 09:29 PM
Okay, flame throwers do two things. They shoot burning fuel which will stick/coat a surface and inginte it if flammable. They will also suck all the oxygen out of the room, which is why they are used and how they kill. Your people will die if they use one. They are NEVER used in an enclosed space, only outside it shooting into an enclosed space.

Burners, torches, gasoline in a toilet or whatever is not the same as a flame thrower. In those cases, you are igniting a flammable gas, not liquid. They do not provide fuel for igniting a fire unless held to a flammable object long enough for it to reach a combustible temperature for that object.

That said, you could use a natural gas or propane line as a "flame thrower" like weapon to dispel your fog. A brush-burner is a nozzle for this type of gas source that would work well. Provided your fog is susceptible to it.

Jeff

Orianna2000
05-07-2013, 06:18 PM
Jeff, aren't there flamethrowers that use propane gas instead of liquid fuel? I thought I read something about that. In any case, I've changed the scene so they only use the flamethrowers while outdoors, to keep the fog at bay while they retreat. When they're stuck in the basement, they use fire extinguishers to freeze the fog just long enough for the volunteer to rush out of the fallout shelter. I think it's feasible now.

Thanks for all the help, I appreciate it! If anyone has further comments, feel free to add them. :)

WeaselFire
05-07-2013, 07:24 PM
Jeff, aren't there flamethrowers that use propane gas instead of liquid fuel?
They would be useless, the gas can't be propelled the same as a liquid. Which means the guy operating it would get fried.

There are plenty of propane flame devices, they just don't "throw" flame anywhere. The commercial ones are good to 10-15 feet, tops.

Jeff

Orianna2000
05-08-2013, 04:04 AM
So when Wikipedia says that most commercial and military flamethrowers today use propane instead of liquid fuel, does that mean they're all short-range? Or is there some extra gadget that makes the flame go further? I'm just curious at this point. It doesn't have much bearing in my story.

Hendo
05-08-2013, 10:57 AM
Maybe try something simpler like cans of hairspray(or something similar) and a lighter? That would give you the shorter flame distance you're looking for.

EMaree
05-08-2013, 03:04 PM
Maybe try something simpler like cans of hairspray(or something similar) and a lighter? That would give you the shorter flame distance you're looking for.

Alternatively, if anyone in your office has an interest in cooking/works part-time in a restaurant/is a chef/has an upcoming birthday or dinner party etc etc then the might own a kitchen flamethrower (used for creme brulees etc). Or, if they're on a budget and frustrated by the shoddy quality of a lot of kitchen flamethrowers they might just go for the more powerful and more reliable gas blow torch (http://search.diy.com/search#w=blow%20torch&asug=) -- these things are standard in a lot of UK restaurants and quite a few kitchens.

It's the kind of thing I could see a chef or enthusiast accidentally leaving in his car boot when he goes to work.

shaldna
05-08-2013, 03:33 PM
I'll hazard an opinion:

NO.

Flamethrowers don't throw flame. They spurt ignited liquid fuel.

caw

This. There is no way to stop that liquid hitting something - be it the floor or walls or whatever - it's what makes them such devestating and effect means of clearance.

I would check out some videos online to see what sort of reach and range they have.

You might always want to check out some of the horrible stories about people who have used them indoors - I remember there was a guy who attacked kids in a school classroom with a homemade one - can't remember the name of the school though, but I'm sure a quick Google would bring it up.

Trebor1415
05-11-2013, 03:25 AM
Here's a thought:

Have your character be stupid or desperate enough to squirt some flame through the doorway and down the hall. Set it up so it uses the last of the fuel in the flamethrower so he doesn't get as big of a squirt of the liquid.

Have the far wall and ceiling catch fire and have the automatic building sprinklers cut in and the fire alarms go off.

With the sirens blazing, the walls smoldering, and the sprinklers drenching everything you could use write a great scene that incorporates all that chaos into the story.

The characters only survive because it used the last of the fuel, which limited the flame to the point where the sprinklers are effective.

Do it right and it cold be exciting to read and set up more problems for your protaganists. You could have the flame squirt and the hallway catch fire close up a chapter for a mini cliffhanger.

Dave Hardy
05-11-2013, 06:18 AM
So when Wikipedia says that most commercial and military flamethrowers today use propane instead of liquid fuel, does that mean they're all short-range? Or is there some extra gadget that makes the flame go further? I'm just curious at this point. It doesn't have much bearing in my story.

I think in a flamethrower the propane pushes out the main fuel source, napalm or gasoline or other highly volatile fluid. You might be thinking of a propane torch, a sort of tool used to solder or braze metal fittings, or to make a creme brule. It's sort of like comparing a nail gun to a .50 caliber Browning machine gun.

Orianna2000
05-11-2013, 08:37 PM
Here is what Wikipedia says:

"Some flamethrowers project a stream of ignited flammable liquid; some project a long gas flame. Most military flamethrowers use liquids, but commercial flamethrowers tend to use high-pressure propane and natural gas, which is considered safer. . . . A propane-operated flamethrower is a relatively straightforward device. The gas is expelled through the gun assembly by its own pressure and is ignited at the exit of the barrel through piezo ignition. Liquid-operated flamethrowers use a smaller propane tank to expel the liquid."

So it sounds like there are two different kinds of gas flamethrowers, one where the gas itself is ignited (perhaps with a shorter range, though it doesn't say), and one where the gas is used to shoot the liquid fuel. Of course, I am aware that Wikipedia isn't always the most accurate source of information.

I plan to give them propane flamethrowers for outside use only, since those are supposed to be safer than liquid fuel types. Then, for the indoors scene, I will have them use CO2 fire extinguishers to battle the fog. I considered having a fire trigger the sprinkler system and having that add to the tension, but I think it would detract from the main point of the scene, which is how the hero is risking his life to test the vaccine against the fog.

Dave Hardy
05-11-2013, 09:05 PM
Here is what Wikipedia says:

"Some flamethrowers project a stream of ignited flammable liquid; some project a long gas flame. Most military flamethrowers use liquids, but commercial flamethrowers tend to use high-pressure propane and natural gas, which is considered safer. . . . A propane-operated flamethrower is a relatively straightforward device. The gas is expelled through the gun assembly by its own pressure and is ignited at the exit of the barrel through piezo ignition. Liquid-operated flamethrowers use a smaller propane tank to expel the liquid."

So it sounds like there are two different kinds of gas flamethrowers, one where the gas itself is ignited (perhaps with a shorter range, though it doesn't say), and one where the gas is used to shoot the liquid fuel. Of course, I am aware that Wikipedia isn't always the most accurate source of information.

I plan to give them propane flamethrowers for outside use only, since those are supposed to be safer than liquid fuel types. Then, for the indoors scene, I will have them use CO2 fire extinguishers to battle the fog. I considered having a fire trigger the sprinkler system and having that add to the tension, but I think it would detract from the main point of the scene, which is how the hero is risking his life to test the vaccine against the fog.

I think the article is conflating a brush-burner or weed burner with a flamethrower. Flamethrower tends to be applied to military usage, at least AFAIK, though maybe in British parlance a weed burner could be a "flame thrower". That may be a bit of the confusion.

A weed burner is for controlled burning, where a military flamethrower is for general devastation. While using a military flamethrower in a bunker is pretty much sure death, a weed burner is risky (limited oxygen), but perhaps not as terrible. Obviously, weed burners are intended for outdoor use, but necessity knows no rules...

EMaree
05-11-2013, 11:14 PM
though maybe in British parlance a weed burner could be a "flame thrower". That may be a bit of the confusion.

In my experience, us Brits tend to call anything with fire coming out one end a "flamethrower". Which isn't very helpful when precise identification is needed! :D

Orianna2000
05-12-2013, 02:05 AM
That could explain the confusion! I've no idea who wrote the article, but it does mention that flamethrowers are a forbidden item for civilians to own in the UK. I wonder if that includes weed burners, too? Ah, well. I'm just glad I caught the whole "indoor flamethrower" scene before I submitted the book to an agent. That would have been embarrassing!

Mr. GreyMan
05-12-2013, 05:41 AM
I think I must be missing something. Why not just have the basement be made mainly out of brick and concrete?

Bomb shelters aren't really known for being built out of flammable material anyway, defeats the purpose.
Also, the basement should have proper ventilation, I would think; metal vents and all that. Even if the bomb shelter is air tight, if the door is open they should be fine.

Orianna2000
05-12-2013, 08:34 AM
I think I must be missing something. Why not just have the basement be made mainly out of brick and concrete?

Bomb shelters aren't really known for being built out of flammable material anyway, defeats the purpose.
Also, the basement should have proper ventilation, I would think; metal vents and all that. Even if the bomb shelter is air tight, if the door is open they should be fine.

Well, I've already described the basement as being similar to the rest of the office building, with carpeted floors and beige walls. There are other important rooms down there, so it's not just storage and the bomb shelter. I didn't want it to look dingy and "basementy," but more like a regular office space.

The bomb shelter itself is concrete, but the hallway outside looks normal. There are air vents within the shelter--ventilation shafts that lead to a filtration system on the roof. And I suppose there are regular AC/heating ducts throughout the basement, like there would be on any other floor. They'll have plenty of air while locked in the shelter.

Mr. GreyMan
05-12-2013, 08:47 AM
I mean, if it's a basement the walls and floors are likely not made of anything flammable. Those ceiling tiles in offices aren't normally flammable and are in metal frames. So, that would just leave what ever office stuff is in there.

They might be able to burn all of that without burning the building down, since the walls are surrounded by dirt not air. Shoot a few flames off, burn some desks and whatnot, but have them burnout after a bit. I've burned some of those grey polyester rugs they have in offices; they more melt than catch fire, and when they do burn it's not for very long. But, it would depend on the setup of the room, of course.
Most stuff in office buildings isn't very flammable by design (metal desks and chairs, depending on time period).

(Alternately, it sounds like a torch and a controlled bonfire might get the job done of holding off this mist. Depending.)

TheBladeRoden
05-16-2013, 01:14 AM
While not exactly spectacular, I would just stick a blowing fan in the doorway

Orianna2000
05-16-2013, 02:23 AM
While not exactly spectacular, I would just stick a blowing fan in the doorway
Brilliant! :D