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Xelebes
05-04-2013, 12:16 AM
The double-storied miniscule g?

Why does the tail start from the left? No, no, don't bring me the Wikipedia article. I've read it. I still don't understand it. What fluid motion produces such a letter? My miniscule gs are always double-storied, but the tail always comes from the right and any attempt to get the tail to come from the left results in spasms and erroneous, wending lines that cast the page with loops of emetic refuse to be submitted to the wastebasket.

So what have you, pen-holding friends? What makes the double-storied miniscule g have such sinister design?

Alessandra Kelley
05-04-2013, 12:35 AM
... But it's a lovely sinuous spiral, like a letter "s." Its shape makes sense with that fluid movement.

Xelebes
05-04-2013, 12:45 AM
... But it's a lovely sinuous spiral, like a letter "s." Its shape makes sense with that fluid movement.

So is it a broken stroke? Because my issue comes from it retracing so much of the loop to get the pen back to the left. It is ungainly.

Cliff Face
05-04-2013, 01:39 AM
Hmm, yeah, I see the problem. That jagged bit in the top-right is either the start or end place, but then the curve needs to retrace bits or change directions or something.

Interesting.

I always write my gs just like that <-- back there, so I've not noticed this before. I have noticed that the bottom part starts on the left instead of the right, which doesn't make sense to me... If a plain g is like that <--, why shouldn't a special g show some form of continuity?

buz
05-04-2013, 04:58 AM
I do it in two "strokes." :) Start with the tail for the top, continue until top circle is complete; lift pen; start at the bottom of top circle and swish around to create the bottom...:D

Cliff Face
05-04-2013, 05:07 AM
That's far too technical for me.

I'm such a lazy handwriter... My s's look like r's, because it doesn't feel natural putting the final curve on it, and I don't care to slow down and do it properly unless I'm writing on a birthday card or something.

Xelebes
05-04-2013, 09:16 AM
I do it in two "strokes." :) Start with the tail for the top, continue until top circle is complete; lift pen; start at the bottom of top circle and swish around to create the bottom...:D

For greatest efficiency, this is bothersome. For example, write the following with your two-stroke method:

Grog glugging Glug's grog grogs Glug grogging Grog's grog.

Is your wrist begging you to stop?

buz
05-04-2013, 03:06 PM
For greatest efficiency, this is bothersome. For example, write the following with your two-stroke method:

Grog glugging Glug's grog grogs Glug grogging Grog's grog.

Is your wrist begging you to stop?

No...the movement is kind of ingrained in muscle memory. But anyway. I'm not saying it's particularly great way of writing a "g," I only answered cause you asked, but I may have misunderstood the question... :)

But no, it's not terribly efficient for handwriting, if that's what you were asking. :)

Chris P
05-04-2013, 03:11 PM
It was designed by a lefty as a token gesture at equal time.