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Cheryll
02-09-2006, 04:43 AM
Here are the rules:

~ Post the opening line or passage of a novel.

~ Everyone else tries to guess the title and author.

~ The first person to answer correctly gets to post a new opening line or passage to another novel.

No cheating now! Don't be doing google searches and whatnot. LOL ;) And please try to post excerpts from novels that are at least moderately well-known.

This is a fun way to test your knowledge of literature and introduce us to new authors/novels we might not be familiar with.

I'll go first...

There was death at its beginning as there would be death again at its end.


Ready? Go....

Cheryll

Cheryll
02-09-2006, 06:57 PM
Over 50 views and no one knows which novel this is? LOL :flag:

Ok... I'll give a few hints. It came out in 1995 under Random House. Has sold over 10 million copies worldwide. And the main characters are Grace, Tom Booker, and a horse named Pilgrim.

Cheryll

Yeshanu
02-09-2006, 07:17 PM
Over 50 views and no one knows which novel this is? LOL http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/smileyflag.gif

Gosh, Cheryll! I think you beat the record, which is in the mid-thirties. Congrats! :D

Can we use Google, or is that cheating? :tongue

Cheryll
02-09-2006, 07:26 PM
Yeshanu, at this point I would say cheating in any form is now allowed! ;)

Maybe I should stick with the classics? LOL


Cheryll

alleycat
02-09-2006, 07:42 PM
I doubt whether the lack of replies are due to no one knowing. Zonk's synopsis game didn't seem to go anywhere either.

Don't worry, I won't whisper the answer!

ac

Yeshanu
02-09-2006, 08:34 PM
Don't worry, I won't whisper the answer!


Ha!

Googled it, and found out that it was The Horse Whisperer.

Next Line:

"There was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it."

Cheryll
02-10-2006, 01:36 AM
I know it's by C. S. Lewis, but I don't know the title. Ack!

Cheryll

TheIT
02-10-2006, 01:49 AM
Voyage of the Dawn Treader?

Cheryll
02-10-2006, 02:40 AM
I looked it up. You are right, TheIT. :) You get to post the next opening line...

Cheryll

TheIT
02-10-2006, 03:14 AM
Thanks. Voyage was my favorite Narnia book, and it's hard to forget a name like Eustace. ;)

I don't have many fiction books at hand right now, but let's throw this one out there:

It was nearing midnight and the Prime Minister was sitting alone in his office, reading a long memo that was slipping through his brain without leaving the slightest trace of meaning behind.

Kida Adelyne
02-10-2006, 03:47 AM
Harry Potter 6! I was about to post that if I knew any novels I would participate, then I reread the line! ^.^


Sailing towards the dawn, and I was perched atop the crow"s nest, being the ship's eyes.

Cheryll
02-10-2006, 04:48 AM
Airborn by Kenneth Opal (sp?) :)

Here's an easy one...

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times...

TheIT
02-10-2006, 04:50 AM
Here's an easy one...

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times...

That's the first one I thought of, but if I answer you I'll have to post another opening line and I don't have one offhand. Tomorrow, maybe.

StoryG27
02-10-2006, 04:54 AM
Airborn by Kenneth Opal (sp?) :)

Here's an easy one...

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times...
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.

I knew it was a Dickens novel but I had to cheat and go pull the book off my shelf to make sure I had the right title.

Next:

"When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow."

TheIT
02-10-2006, 05:02 AM
Next:

"When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow."

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

And I found another one:

There was once a boy named Milo who didn't know what to do with himself -- not just sometimes, but always.

WerenCole
02-10-2006, 06:14 AM
The Phantom Tollbooth. . . when he was in school he longed to be out, and when he was out he longed to be in. On th way he thought about coming coming, and coming home he thought about going. Wherever he was he wished he were somewhere else, and when he got there he wondered why he'd bothered. Nothing really interested him, least of all the things that should have.




In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I have been turning over in my head ever since.

robeiae
02-10-2006, 06:23 AM
Paradise Lost?

Rob :D

WerenCole
02-10-2006, 09:03 AM
Right author, wrong book.

travNastee
02-10-2006, 09:13 AM
In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I have been turning over in my head ever since.

The Great Gatsby, no? Wasn't Paradise Lost by Milton?

WerenCole
02-10-2006, 09:20 AM
Your right, Milton. . . had a slight breakdown in titles. . . and your right on the other front as well.


Lyra and her daemon moved through the darkening hall, taking care to keep to one side, out of site from the kitchen.

travNastee
02-10-2006, 09:23 AM
Hey...isn't it my turn? Oh well. If it is my turn, here's mine:

"The station wagons arrived at noon, a long shining line that coursed through the west campus."

No clue on yours, Cole.

BlackCrowesChick
02-10-2006, 11:43 AM
White Noise Critical: Text and Criticism by Don DeLillo and Mark Osteen.

That's the answer to Trav's.

The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman is the answer to werencole's.

So do I go now then? Okay, here's mine:

On a very hot day in August of 1994, my wife told me she was going down to the Derry Rite Aid to pick up a refill on her sinus medicine prescription - this is stuff you can buy over the counter these days, I believe.

Cheryll
02-10-2006, 08:25 PM
Bag of Bones by Stephen King.


My wound is geography. It is also my anchorage, my port of call.

I grew up slowly beside the tides and marshes of Colleton. My arms were tawny and strong from working long days on the shrimp boat in the blazing South Carolina heat....

Cheryll

LloydBrown
02-10-2006, 08:28 PM
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

I'm reading that now.

I, uh, don't dig it much. I'm going to finish it anyway, though.

Sorry to interrupt the game.

ChaosTitan
02-11-2006, 03:56 AM
I grew up slowly beside the tides and marshes of Colleton. My arms were tawny and strong from working long days on the shrimp boat in the blazing South Carolina heat....



The Prince of Tides, by Pat Conroy

Let's see what I can find....

The terror, which would not end for another twenty-eight years--if it ever did end--began, so far as I know or can tell, with a boat made from a sheet of newspaper floating down a gutter swollen with rain.

TheIT
02-11-2006, 03:58 AM
The terror, which would not end for another twenty-eight years--if it ever did end--began, so far as I know or can tell, with a boat made from a sheet of newspaper floating down a gutter swollen with rain.

I've never read it, but is this Steven King's It? (no relation :D )

Yeshanu
02-11-2006, 04:45 AM
So Amazon.com says, IT:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0451169514/104-3846737-3272713?v=glance&n=283155

Your go.

TheIT
02-11-2006, 04:52 AM
It was a dark and stormy night.

And yes, I'm thinking of a specific novel not written by Snoopy or Bulwer-Lytton. I'll give more clues later if needed. Have fun! :D

StoryG27
02-11-2006, 04:53 AM
It was a dark and stormy night.
Seriously? Wow, I have no clue.

Yeshanu
02-11-2006, 04:59 AM
Ha! Not "Paul Clifford" by Bulwer-Lytton, eh?

Is it a children's book? :D (Yeah, I cheated. I won't post the answer for a bit, to give others the chance.)

TheIT
02-11-2006, 05:05 AM
Children? Whatsit you said? ;)

This was one of my favorite books when I was little.

StoryG27
02-11-2006, 05:11 AM
Wait a minute, is the first line also the title? Is it cheating if I ask that?

TheIT
02-11-2006, 05:14 AM
No, the first line isn't the title (and I don't think the question is cheating).

StoryG27
02-11-2006, 05:26 AM
Oh, oh, this could be wrong but is it A Wrinkle in Time?

If it is, I have no idea who the author is.

TheIT
02-11-2006, 05:32 AM
Oh, oh, this could be wrong but is it A Wrinkle in Time?

If it is, I have no idea who the author is.

Ding-ding-ding-ding! Give that lady a cookie! The author is Madeleine L'Engle. My family ended up with about four copies of this book because my siblings and I saw it in the Scholastic Book Club and ordered it without realizing we already had it. Great story. I hadn't remembered how it started until I looked it up on Amazon.

Storygirl, your turn.

StoryG27
02-11-2006, 05:36 AM
My daughter check that book out from the library a couple years ago. I loved it. I just didn't remember how it started. Um, ok, gimme just a sec to think of one. I'll be right back with a line...promise.

StoryG27
02-11-2006, 05:38 AM
Ok, here's one:

"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."

ChaosTitan
02-11-2006, 06:29 AM
:hooray: Oooh!!!

George Orwell's 1984.

Dang, that means it's my turn again.... uh...

One sec.....I'll be back.

ChaosTitan
02-11-2006, 06:32 AM
Here's a good one:

When I stepped out into the bright sunlight, from the darkness of the movie house, I had only two things on my mind: Paul Newman and a ride home.

Cheryll
02-11-2006, 07:08 AM
The Outsiders :)


Imagine a ruin so strange it must never have happened.

StoryG27
02-11-2006, 07:43 PM
Imagine a ruin so strange it must never have happened.

Oh, oh, I know what it is. Somewhere near the beginning there is another line that is something like: The forest eats itself and lives forever. Ok, that may not be an exact quote, but I actually read the first page of this online the other day when I was browsing book reviews (of books that belong to a certain club *wink*). And again, I think I remember the title, but not the author, galldernit! I'll let someone else guess who actually knows the author too.

Yeshanu
02-11-2006, 09:44 PM
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver?
Hmm... Another line, another line...

"Death changes everything."

ChaosTitan
02-13-2006, 08:28 AM
Dude.

I think we've been officially stumped. Is it okay to Google it now? :tongue

Cheryll
02-13-2006, 09:30 AM
Yeshanu, you win. What is it? LOL

Cheryll

Yeshanu
02-14-2006, 12:59 AM
Y'all can Google it if you want.

Yeshanu
02-14-2006, 01:03 AM
Oooh! I Googled it myself, and even Google was stumped!

It's Cavedweller, by Dorothy Allison. Great book, btw.

Okay, try this one:

"They were supposed to stay at the beach a week, but neither of them had the heart for it and they decided to come back early."

Eveningsdawn
02-14-2006, 04:43 AM
Just randomly, because I know it had beaches and vaguely depressed people in it...

The Awakening?

Yeshanu
02-14-2006, 06:52 AM
Nice try, but...



Nope.

Cheryll
02-15-2006, 12:25 AM
The Accidental Tourist by Ann Tyler

"Suppose that you and I were sitting in a quiet room overlooking a garden, chatting and sipping at our cups of green tea while we talked about something that had happened a long while ago, and I said to you, "That afternoon when I met so-and-so, was the very best afternoon of my life, and also the very worst."

Cheryll

Yeshanu
02-15-2006, 04:34 AM
Argh! Why am I thinking I should know this one, and can't dredge it up?

Cheryll
02-16-2006, 12:29 AM
I'll give some hints...

Written by a man.
Main character is a woman.
Locale is Asia.
Made into a major motion picture earlier this year. :)

Cheryll

Angel_Of_The_Morning
02-16-2006, 02:56 AM
Wild guess, though I haven't read it, based on your hints: Memoirs of a Geisha?

In case I'm right, here's the next one:

"It was love at first sight."

Cheryll
02-16-2006, 03:15 AM
ding ding ding

You are correct, Angel. :)

Cheryll
02-16-2006, 09:15 PM
Angel, I think we are officially stumped. I couldn't even google it. LOL

Feel free to jump back into the game and let us off the hook. In the meantime, here's an easy one:


Marley was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that.


Cheryll

MarkN
02-16-2006, 09:33 PM
Dicken's A Christmas Carol. Finally, I've been following this thread for days now. :)

MarkN
02-16-2006, 09:37 PM
Ok, here's one: "I've watched through his eyes, I've listened through his ears, and I tell you he's the one. Or at least as close as we're going to get."

Angel_Of_The_Morning
02-17-2006, 01:52 AM
Okay, here's the first line, with the second line:
"It was love at first sight.
The first time Yossarian saw the chaplain he fell madly in love with him."

That should make it a little easier. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/wink.gif

TheIT
02-17-2006, 01:53 AM
Okay, here's the first line, with the second line:
"It was love at first sight.
The first time Yossarian saw the chaplain he fell madly in love with him."

That should make it a little easier. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/wink.gif

Catch-22 by Kurt Vonnegut?

WerenCole
02-17-2006, 01:59 AM
Catch-22 was written by Joseph Heller. . . . and that is the first line to that novel.

WerenCole
02-17-2006, 02:01 AM
Ok, here's one: "I've watched through his eyes, I've listened through his ears, and I tell you he's the one. Or at least as close as we're going to get."


One of my favorite novels. . . Enders Game by O.S. Card




My turn:)

All this happened, more or less.

Angel_Of_The_Morning
02-17-2006, 02:04 AM
Ooh, I know this one. . . Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut.

Next:
"Hazel Motes sat at a forward angle on the green plush train seat, looking one minute at the window as if he might want to jump out of it, and the next down the aisle at the other end of the car."

Cheryll
02-17-2006, 07:11 AM
Wise Blood by Flannery O'Conner :)


To the red country and part of the gray country of Oklahoma, the last rains came gently, and they did not cut the scarred earth.


Cheryll

MrAlex'sMommy
02-17-2006, 08:45 PM
Woo hoo!

The Grapes of Wrath by Steinbeck
My turn? Yea!!

Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board.

Prosthetic Foreheads
02-19-2006, 12:49 AM
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

Here's one:

"Helen's suit is red, but not a strawberry red. It's more the red of a strawberry mousse, topped with whipped creme fraiche and served in a stemmed crystal compote. Inside her pink cloud of hair, her earrings sparkle pink and red in the sunlight."


It's not the opening line, but the initial post said it didn't have to be.

Prosthetic Foreheads
02-19-2006, 12:54 AM
Whoops. I misread the rules, so here's the opening of that same novel:


"At first, the new owner pretends he never looked at the living room floor. Never really looked."

luxintenebrae
02-21-2006, 12:32 AM
Can we look it up yet?? :tongue

Prosthetic Foreheads
02-21-2006, 05:25 AM
Google away.

Prosthetic Foreheads
02-21-2006, 05:38 AM
Btw, when you find out what it is, I suggest you read it. It's fantastic.

luxintenebrae
02-21-2006, 08:42 AM
Lullaby? :D

Prosthetic Foreheads
02-21-2006, 08:50 AM
Yep. Lullaby by Chuck Palahniuk. Your turn. And read Lullaby. That's an order!

luxintenebrae
02-21-2006, 08:50 AM
Here's mine, if I'm right:

The Nellie, a cruising yawl, swung to her anchor without a flutter of the sails, and was at rest. The flood had made, the wind was nearly calm, and being bound down the river, the only thing for it was to come to and wait for the turn of the tide.

Hope no one's done this one already!

luxintenebrae
02-21-2006, 08:53 AM
I just read a thing online about Lullaby - ooh, interesting!! I like the sound of that!

travNastee
02-21-2006, 09:13 AM
Heart of Darkness, mai non?

luxintenebrae
02-21-2006, 09:21 AM
Dang it! Yep, you're right. Your turn!

travNastee
02-21-2006, 09:23 AM
I just read it at the behest of someone a few weeks ago.

Hmm...okay...


Through the fence, between the curling flower spaces, I could see them hitting.

nandu
02-22-2006, 06:33 PM
The Sound and the Fury.

Am I correct?

travNastee
02-22-2006, 11:10 PM
We have a winner

nandu
02-23-2006, 11:03 AM
I guess it's my turn now.

"I have just returned from a visit to my landlord, the neighbour I'm most likely to be troubled with."

Cheryll
02-23-2006, 11:10 AM
Wuthering Heights :)

The accused man, Kabuo Miyamoto, sat proudly upright with a rigid grace, his palms placed softly on the defendant's table - the posture of a man who has detached himself insofar as this is possible at his own trial.

Cheryll

MrAlex'sMommy
02-25-2006, 03:01 AM
I don't know the answer, but I'm bumping in case someone else does.

You've stumped me! http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/smile.gif

PattiTheWicked
02-25-2006, 06:52 AM
I just started reading this: Snow Falling on Cedars.

Here's the next one:

The primroses were over. Toward the edge of the wood, where the ground became open and sloped down to an old fence and a brambly ditch beyond, only a few fading patches of pale yellow still showed among the dog's mercury and oak tree roots.

nandu
02-25-2006, 02:31 PM
Watership Down.

Imagine, then, a flat landscape, dark for the moment, but even so conveying to a girl running in the still deeper shadow cast by the wall of the Bibighar gardens an idea of immensity, of distance, such as years before Miss Crane had been conscious of standing where a lane ended and cultivation began: a different landscape but also in the alluvial plain between the mountains of the north and the plateau of the south.

madderblue
02-25-2006, 04:14 PM
Jewell in the Crown by Paul Scott.


"I was born twice: first as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974. "

dancingandflying
02-27-2006, 12:15 AM
"I was born twice: first as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974. "

that is middlesex written by jeffrey eugenides, no?
my turn, i guess.
For reasons that will become obvious, I find it difficult to write about Stewart.

Nicholson James
02-27-2006, 02:54 AM
Colapinto's About the Author, I think. My aunt has it on her shelf somewhere.

If I'm wrong, ignore this following passage; if not, though, answer it.

This should be no problem for the well-read ladies and gentlemen present:

The year 1866 was signalized by a remarkable incident, a mysterious and inexplicable phenomenon, which doubtless no one has yet forgotten. Not to mention rumors which agitated the maritime population, and excited the public mind, even in the interior of continents, seafaring men were particularly excited. Merchants, common sailors, captains of vessels, skippers, both of Europe and America, naval officers of all countries, and the Governments of several states on the two continents, were deeply interested in the matter.

Cheryll
02-27-2006, 03:07 AM
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea :)

Here's an easy one:

Today is the anniversary of my birth...

PastMidnight
02-28-2006, 01:22 AM
I really want to play, but haven't been able to get anything yet. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/frown.gif I'll keep checking back!

luxintenebrae
03-01-2006, 03:31 AM
Can we have another hint? :Shrug:

Cheryll
03-01-2006, 04:18 AM
Maybe this book wasn't as popular as I thought! :tongue

Here's the opening paragraph:

Today is the anniversary of my birth. I have twenty eight years. This diary and the pen I am writing with are the best gifts I got - except maybe my cake. R. gave me the diary, the pen, and the white frosted tiers. He also gave me emerald earbobs. I think maybe my emeralds are just green glass; I hope maybe they be genuine peridots.

PastMidnight
03-02-2006, 05:05 AM
Sorry, don't know it!

luxintenebrae
03-02-2006, 10:58 AM
I googled it when I thought I knew what it was, but I wasn't right. Found out what it really was, and nope, never read it. (But I'll wait for someone to answer that knows it without googling!)

dancingandflying
03-05-2006, 08:34 PM
Maybe this book wasn't as popular as I thought! :tongue

Here's the opening paragraph:

Today is the anniversary of my birth. I have twenty eight years. This diary and the pen I am writing with are the best gifts I got - except maybe my cake. R. gave me the diary, the pen, and the white frosted tiers. He also gave me emerald earbobs. I think maybe my emeralds are just green glass; I hope maybe they be genuine peridots.

that's the wind done gone, correct? if not, ingore what else i have to say.:hooray:i've been wanting to use this novel for ever! here it is:

my suffering left me sad and gloomy.

madderblue
03-06-2006, 08:46 AM
Life of Pi by Yann Martel!! I Loved that book, btw.


Okay, my turn?

"It's hot as hell in Martirio, but the papers on the porch are icy with the news."

madderblue
03-08-2006, 03:51 PM
Did I just kill this thread?:cry:

Cheryll
03-08-2006, 07:45 PM
I would say it's time to google. ;)

madderblue
03-09-2006, 03:24 AM
:D Okay, I'll give a hint...The book won the 2003 Man Booker Prize. I really liked it, some of my friends say I'm lucky our friendship survived me making them read it!!

Yeshanu
03-09-2006, 03:40 AM
Okay, I googled. :tongue


It's Vernon God Little, by BBC Pierre

I really liked it, some of my friends say I'm lucky our friendship survived me making them read it!!

That good, huh?

Okay, my turn...

Genre fiction, anyone?

Dougless Montgomery sat in the back seat of the car, Robert and his pudgy thirteen-year-old daughter, Gloria, in the front.

Cheryll
03-10-2006, 06:51 AM
Ooooooh, Yeshanu.... I know this one, but I can't think of it right now! LOL

**think**

**think**

Cheryll

dancingandflying
03-12-2006, 08:56 PM
Genre fiction, anyone?

Dougless Montgomery sat in the back seat of the car, Robert and his pudgy thirteen-year-old daughter, Gloria, in the front.

that's knight in shining armor by jude deveraux, right? if not, skip whatever else i have to say...

It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.

Yeshanu
03-12-2006, 09:00 PM
You got it.


About yours: :Headbang:

I know this one. I do...

PastMidnight
03-12-2006, 11:10 PM
At last, I know one!

George Orwell 1984

Here's mine: "Serene was a word you could put to Brooklyn, New York."

PastMidnight
03-15-2006, 01:59 PM
And I was afraid that this one would be too easy! http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/tongue.gif A little more?

"Serene was a word you could put to Brooklyn, New York. Especially in the summer of 1912. Somber, as a word, was better. But it did not apply to Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Praire was lovely and Shenandoah had a beautiful sound, but you couldn't fit those words into Brooklyn. Serene was the only word for it; especially on a Saturday afternoon in summer."

Eveningsdawn
03-18-2006, 05:17 AM
Gonna say it's time to Google.


A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, by Betty Smith. What the hell, I should have known that.

Next: "At the sunset hour of one warm spring day two men were to be seen at Patriarch's Pond."


I will be fairly impressed if anyone gets this right away. I'm reading it right now.

dancingandflying
03-18-2006, 09:38 PM
that's never talk to strangers by mikhail bulgakov, isn't it? i just had one of my friends read it about two months ago.

okay... my turn.

theseus, duke of athens, is planning the festivities for his upcoming wedding to the newly captured amazon, hippolyta.

it may not be considered a 'novel'... but if you check it on amazon... it's considered a 'book'. tell me if i can't use it, and i'll use a line from another novel.

Eveningsdawn
03-19-2006, 09:30 AM
The book is not called Never Talk to Strangers. However, you have the author.


ANd that would be Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream.

Next person still has to get the real title of: "At the sunset hour of one warm spring day two men were to be seen at Patriarch's Pond."

luxintenebrae
03-25-2006, 10:40 AM
Can we have help yet? :D

Forbidden Snowflake
03-25-2006, 03:20 PM
It's not Never Talk to Strangers? Now I'm so confused that I must go to the library. ;)

Eveningsdawn
03-26-2006, 12:11 AM
*is rather amused* I don't know how you managed to get what chapter it was from but not the actual book...

Never Talk to Strangers is the first chapter of the book in question, from which the line was taken. So technically? Dancing was right.

And yeah you can help now.

spirit.of.the.rain
03-27-2006, 01:45 AM
isn't that the master and the margarita by mikhail bulgakov? give me a reply if it's right. thanks.

measure in love,
spirit.of.the.rain.

Forbidden Snowflake
03-27-2006, 01:56 AM
Never Talk to Strangers is the first chapter of the book in question, from which the line was taken. So technically? Dancing was right.


Probably because my memory must be all over the place, or the title of the chapter left such an impression that I remembered that instead of the title of the book. Which is scary. :scared:

Eveningsdawn
03-27-2006, 03:29 AM
Spirit, you are right! You can put up the next one.

spirit.of.the.rain
03-28-2006, 04:07 AM
woot-woot! okay... here it is... this is the first line in the prologe.

renowned curator jacques sauniere staggered through the vaulted archway of the museum's grand gallery.

if you don't know that, here's the first line of the chapter:

robert langdon awoke slowly.

i hope this one isn't too easy.

measure in love,
spirit.of.the.rain.

trumancoyote
03-28-2006, 04:19 AM
The Da Vinci Code, unfortunately.

"124 was spiteful."

PastMidnight
03-28-2006, 11:59 AM
Beloved Toni Morrison


"Howard Roark laughed."

nandu
03-28-2006, 06:10 PM
The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand.

"A cool heavenly breeze took possession of him."

Ocha
03-29-2006, 09:55 AM
The last temptation of Christ by Nikos Kazantzakis

"They're all dead now."

Simran
04-02-2006, 05:56 AM
The last temptation of Christ by Nikos Kazantzakis

"They're all dead now."


Fall on Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald


"I'm about to buy a house in a foreign country."

(I was going to use the opening line to Life of Pi - one of my favorite novels but then I noticed dancingandflying beat me to it. ;) )

Simran
04-03-2006, 12:10 AM
Might I have gone and created a literary kafuffle? Here is a hint, which may assist you in the guessing process: woman author

luxintenebrae
04-03-2006, 12:22 AM
Reminds me of the movie Under the Tuscan Sun. I thought there was a book on it too, but not sure...

Simran
04-03-2006, 12:31 AM
Reminds me of the movie Under the Tuscan Sun. I thought there was a book on it too, but not sure...

Correct Mr. Adams! Very good. Do you remember the author's name?

luxintenebrae
04-03-2006, 12:39 AM
Hurray! I don't remember the author's name though. It wasn't Nicholas Sparks, was it? :)

luxintenebrae
04-03-2006, 12:48 AM
Ok, I have one. It's a short sentence, though, but I'll see if the 2nd one is needed later.

"This is written from memory, unfortunately."

Oh, and I looked up the author: Frances Mayes. Not Nicholas Sparks. :tongue

Simran
04-03-2006, 12:53 AM
Ok, I have one. It's a short sentence, though, but I'll see if the 2nd one is needed later.

"This is written from memory, unfortunately."

Oh, and I looked up the author: Frances Mayes. Not Nicholas Sparks. :tongue

Yes, it was Francis Mayes. I love Nicholas Sparks novels but hopefully he isn't a woman. LOL :ROFL:

luxintenebrae
04-03-2006, 01:19 AM
Yes, it was Francis Mayes. I love Nicholas Sparks novels but hopefully he isn't a woman. LOL :ROFL:

Oh, yeah. Forgot about that part! :D

luxintenebrae
04-03-2006, 08:07 AM
Hmm, no guesses? All right, I'll give the second sentence. Probably not much more helpful.

"If I could have brought with me the material I so carefully prepared, this would be a very different story."

Oh, and it's also a woman writer.

luxintenebrae
04-04-2006, 02:41 AM
Oh, hey, good job! Correct author. YES! I just read the book I quoted for one class and Yellow Wall-paper for another. Such totally different stories (same feminist theme though). Wow, what an amazing story. I loved it! So weird, and it seriously just creeped me out, all her creeping around. We're doing group presentations in class these past couple weeks, and a group did that one today. It was cute - they printed the study guides on yellow paper and then tore up all the edges like in the story. :tongue Do you want more hints? Van, Terry, and Jeff are the guys, and Ellador, Celis, and Alima.

luxintenebrae
04-04-2006, 02:45 AM
And the book is similar to Thomas More's and Samuel Butler's. What do you think, if no one gets it by around 10 or so, everyone's free to google it?

(I'd give the last line, too, but it has the title in it.) :D

blacbird
04-04-2006, 03:31 AM
Herland.

A sharp clip-crop of iron-shod hoofs deadened and died away, and clouds of yellow dust drifted from under the cottonwoods out over the sage.

caw.

luxintenebrae
04-04-2006, 04:01 AM
Yay! Good job! :hooray:

luxintenebrae
04-05-2006, 06:31 AM
How 'bout Shane? :D Only thing popping in my head. That and Grapes of Wrath. I don't know why. I really have absolutely no idea. Anyone else? Any more hints?

luxintenebrae
04-06-2006, 12:58 AM
Where is it set?

luxintenebrae
04-11-2006, 02:56 AM
Can I say what it is yet? Figured it was time to look it up already. It's Riders of the Purple Sage. Ok, here's another one. I hope no one's asked it yet. (I hope I haven't asked it yet either!)

The last drops of the thundershower had hardly ceased falling when the Pedestrian stuffed his map into his pocket, settled his pack more comfortably on his tired shoulders, and stepped out from the shelter of a large chestnut-tree into the middle of the road.

WerenCole
04-11-2006, 08:27 PM
Yay. . . I know this one. It is Silent Planet. . . I think. C.S. Lewis right? Something along that lines.


Either that or something by Kerouac.


If I am right, then here is mine.



The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.

I may not be around to tell you if this is right, so if you know you got it, then just go on with the game. I think it is pretty easy anyway.

luxintenebrae
04-12-2006, 12:31 AM
Yep, Out of the Silent Planet. Good job! (The description in it is amazing, I think.)

PastMidnight
04-12-2006, 03:47 AM
The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.

I may not be around to tell you if this is right, so if you know you got it, then just go on with the game. I think it is pretty easy anyway.

Arghhh! I know that I know this one. Let me think on this....

luxintenebrae
04-12-2006, 07:24 AM
You're right I think. :Clap: Your turn!

Cheryll
04-24-2006, 08:55 PM
KTC, I think you've officially killed this thread. LOL

luxintenebrae
04-24-2006, 11:55 PM
If no one else has one, I do, unless KTC comes back soon:

For the first fifteen years of our lives, Danny and I lived within five blocks of each other and neither of us knew of the other's existence.

I liked this one. Hopefully, everybody was assigned to read this in high school like I was. :)

luxintenebrae
04-28-2006, 01:30 AM
Need a hint? It's about Russian and Polish Hasidic Jews (namely 2 preteen boys) living in Williamsburg I think.

luxintenebrae
04-29-2006, 12:58 AM
Oh, darn it, I don't want to kill the thread either! :tongue Whoever looks it up first can post a new one.

Bob Dole
05-04-2006, 12:17 AM
The Chosen by Potok, Chaim

sorry I am not using an opening line or passage hop it doesn't make anyone too mad. "Him's name is Roland, mama. I dream about him, sometimes. Him's a King, too."

ChaosTitan
05-06-2006, 08:11 AM
Insomnia, by Stephen King.


Back to opening lines....

I remember the day the Aleut ship came to our island. At first it seemed like a small shell afloat on the sea. Then it grew larger and was a gull with folded wings.

Serenity
05-06-2006, 08:23 AM
YEAH and hot d*** I know one!!!!


Island of the Blue Dolphins, Scott O'Dell!

On his thirty-sixth birthday, May 18, Travis Cornell rose at five o'clock in the morning.

Serenity
05-09-2006, 08:35 AM
<Blinks> Damn, did I stump everyone, or are y'all just ignoring me? Ok, I will continue with the next few lines... just in case.


On his thirty-sixth birthday, May 18, Travis Cornell rose at five o'clock in the morning. He dressed in his sturdy hiking boots, jeans, and a long-sleeved, blue -plaid cotton shirt. He drove his pickup south from his home in Santa Barbara all the way to rural Santiago Canyon on the eastern edge of Orange County, south of Los Angeles.

And if that doesn't help, I'll finish with the first paragraph... http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/frown.gif

Serenity
05-16-2006, 05:16 AM
Ok, it was The Watchers, by Dean R. Koontz. Someone else can pick the next one.

underthecity
05-16-2006, 06:51 AM
(This one could be too easy):

Jack Torrance thought, Officious little prick.

nandu
05-16-2006, 10:16 AM
The Shining, by Stephen King. Too easy!

He sat, in defiance of municipal orders, astride the gun Zam-Zammah on her brick platform opposite the old Ajaib-Gher - the Wonder House, as the natives call the Lahore Museum.

Nandu.

JimmyB27
05-18-2006, 05:21 PM
Bump!

Someone post one I can figure out :tongue

FreeStyle
07-07-2006, 11:57 PM
He sat, in defiance of municipal orders, astride the gun Zam-Zammah on her brick platform opposite the old Ajaib-Gher - the Wonder House, as the natives call the Lahore Museum.

Kim by Rudyard Kipling (had to look that one up)

this one should be easy for folks,

If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but i don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth.

sharpierae
07-08-2006, 12:34 AM
Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger, yes?


Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendia was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice.

FreeStyle
07-08-2006, 04:30 AM
100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.


Next is a second line because (hint) the first line has the title in it. Too easy!

No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms.

Siddow
07-08-2006, 04:40 AM
No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms.

Invisible Man!

here's mine, forgive me if it's been done:
Some stories must wait to be told.

FreeStyle
07-09-2006, 12:30 AM
Turning Angel by Greg Iles (I did a search, though. Had no idea on that one.)


next,

Monday, 29 January, 1932: Something has happened to me, I can't doubt it anymore.

TrainofThought
07-10-2006, 05:43 AM
Just guessing: "The Philadelphia Experiment"

FreeStyle
07-10-2006, 07:34 AM
Nope, sorry.

Storyteller5
07-10-2006, 08:36 AM
Nausea by Sartre?

FreeStyle
07-11-2006, 04:18 AM
Yes, that's right! But now you have to give the opening line or passage a novel (preferably well known) for others to guess. Or I guess someone else could.

Loria Amnekia
09-17-2006, 11:21 AM
The event that came to be known as The Pulse began at 3:03 p.m., eastern standard time, on the afternoon of October 1.

Loria Amnekia
09-19-2006, 09:42 AM
Hm. Guess know one knows it. It's from Stephen King's book, Cell. Okay, someone else can go now.

xhouseboy
09-19-2006, 02:51 PM
Kinraddie lands had been won by a Norman childe, Cospatric de Gondeshil, in the days of William the Lyon, when gryphons and suchlike beasts still roamed the Scots countryside and folk would waken in their beds to hear the children screaming, with a great wolf-beast, come through the hide window, tearing at their throats.

K1P1
10-16-2006, 08:22 PM
Sunset Song, by Lewis Grassic Gibbon (pseud. James Leslie Mitchell). I love [I]A Scots Quair, but loaned my copy to someone years ago who never gave it back. Must buy a new one.

No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy would have supposed her born to be an heroine.

MDavis
10-16-2006, 08:56 PM
The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte :)

I think...right?

K1P1
10-16-2006, 09:14 PM
Sorry, but no.

MDavis
10-16-2006, 09:21 PM
Oh I feel so dumb! I know what it is now, but I guess I've already had my chance. I had both of these books in the same class in college.

How annoying ;) Good luck for everyone else.

K1P1
10-16-2006, 09:23 PM
Go ahead and guess again - why shouldn't you?

I checked the original rules, and there's nothing outlawing multiple guesses.

sharra
10-16-2006, 09:24 PM
Northanger Abbey - Jane Austen?

K1P1
10-16-2006, 09:24 PM
DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! DING!

sharra wins!

MDavis
10-16-2006, 09:26 PM
Beat me to it! Congrats Sharra!

sharra
10-16-2006, 09:52 PM
Phew! Been a long, long time,since I read that.

"No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks & katydids are supposed, by some, to dream."

sharra
10-17-2006, 03:32 PM
nothing yet?

should I put another line up?

sharra
10-17-2006, 08:44 PM
ok; major clue:

"...whatever walked there, walked alone."


Someone has to recognise this?
:Shrug:

alleycat
10-17-2006, 08:51 PM
The Haunting of Hill House.

"I came across a photograph of him long long ago, his black face with the long snout sniffing at something in the air, his tail straight and pointing, his eyes flashing in some momentary excitement"

sharra
10-20-2006, 04:57 PM
That's it!!
Am currently banging my head on your one though..

alleycat
10-20-2006, 05:17 PM
I'd almost forgotten I'd posted in this thread.


That's it!!
Am currently banging my head on your one though..

Perhaps a couple of hints then.

The book was published within the past ten or twelve years. It's a short, simple story of a man's reminiscence of his boyhood and his beloved dog.

The book was made into a move (although the movie wasn't exactly a blockbuster).

alleycat
10-20-2006, 05:19 PM
Exactly right, I Shrugged. Funny, we posted at the same time.

Mom'sWrite
10-20-2006, 07:38 PM
It is a sin to write this.

(First sentence. If no one gets it, I'll write more.)

Anthem by Ayn Rand (that fits, I Shrugged:) )

Here's an easy one:

The village of Holcomb stands on the high wheat plains of western Kansas, a lonesome area that other Kansans call "out there."

Name that tune.

CaroGirl
10-20-2006, 08:51 PM
"The village of Holcomb stands on the high wheat plains of western Kansas, a lonesome area that other Kansans call "out there."

Name that tune.
That's one of my favourite books of all time: In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. Makes me want to read it all over again.

How about this one: "It is the day of Wang Lung's marriage."

J. Weiland
10-25-2006, 02:44 PM
I looked it up, and thus cheated. :D

The Good Earth by Pearl Buck

Here's another one: "Like a radar echo bounding from a distant object and returning to it's source, the sound of Roy Complain's beating heart seemed to fill the clearing."

... should be easy... :)

K1P1
10-25-2006, 03:10 PM
What this thread proves to me is that AWers' tastes in reading are completely inconsistent.

J. Weiland
10-25-2006, 04:41 PM
K1P1's Book of Thread-spoiling Commentaries? :D

K1P1
10-25-2006, 04:46 PM
Wait, wait. How did you know I'd sent out a proposal for that? :D

TrainofThought
12-02-2006, 04:19 AM
The Good Earth by Pearl Buck? - Have no idea.