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slhuang
04-25-2013, 11:06 PM
The recent discussions of representation in literature in other threads got me thinking -- a lot of us on this board are writing books with POC MC's. And more than that, a lot of us seek out books with POC MC's, and think it's important to read them, and to support authors who write them. So I thought, why not have a recommendation/promotion thread for books featuring POC?

Suggested rules of the thread:

1) Authors are more than welcome to post about their own works!
2) Books must have a POC protagonist and preferably a predominantly POC cast. I don't think this should be the place for the "all-white high school with the one black best friend" books.
3) The POCs should, in the poster's opinion, be human, non-stereotyped portrayals.
4) Give us the title and genre, and optionally describe what you like about the book and the portrayals of the characters of color.
5) Short stories and novellas welcome too.
6) Feel free to recommend books other posters have already recommended (let's make it a love fest!), or to come back and add your thoughts on a book you found here.

We can alter the above guidelines at the suggestion of other posters. What do you all think?

(p.s. -- I looked to see if this had been done before and I couldn't find it -- closest I found was people asking for specific sorts of recommendations. But if it has been done, someone bump that thread . . . because I want me some cool recs! ::anticipates reading list:: )

slhuang
04-25-2013, 11:38 PM
And I'll kick it off by listing a few recommendations from my recent reading:

Brown Girl in the Ring (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0446674338/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0446674338&linkCode=as2&tag=slhu-20), by Nalo Hopkinson (novel) -- speculative fiction, dystopian with supernatural elements, I'd say, but I think both SFF fans and literary fiction readers would enjoy it. Y'know, scifi geeks (including me) always go on about worldbuilding -- well, I thought Hopkinson's worldbuilding was the most real-feeling dystopia I'd ever read. Her collapsed version of Toronto felt frighteningly possible. And for anyone who gets anxiety about how to write POC "right," this is a fantastic example of a book in which all of the characters (and almost the whole cast is POC) are so extremely human, all in different ways -- some of them are flawed and weak one way, and some of them are flawed and weak in other ways, and some of them are evil, and some of them are desperate, but they're all very, very human -- and when they find the strength to fight you root for them that much more.

The House of Aunts (http://giganotosaurus.org/2011/12/01/the-house-of-aunts/), by Zen Cho (short story; links to free online copy) -- Malaysian vampire story, and hands down the best vampire story I've ever read. Ah Lee goes to class and does her homework and fights with her aunties, and finds being dead extremely, heartbreakingly lonely. And then she gets a crush on a boy. (And the bonds between Ah Lee and her aunties are some of the most lovely familial ties Iíve ever read.)

The Phoenix (http://www.onthepremises.com/issue_11/story_11_1.html), by Ken Liu (short story; links to free online copy) -- literary fiction that takes place in China. Uh . . . I went to link to this and ended up rereading the whole thing; it's that good. It's also a short story I have tried and failed to write a sufficient recommendation for before -- basically, all I can say is, go read it now.

lolchemist
04-25-2013, 11:59 PM
Haha, don't kill me but:

Modelland by Tyra Banks - MC is black and a huge amount of the remaining characters are minorities. The book itself is pretty good. It's a YA fantasy with very surrealistic elements.

Kitty Pryde
04-26-2013, 12:45 AM
I believe we do have a thread on this. when i get home i can merge threads.

Kim Fierce
04-27-2013, 06:41 AM
"The Divide, Book 1: Uprising" (by me) Dystopia: Every character is multi-racial. MC Serenity has a white father and black mother. I don't get into full details of specific races in book 1,because the MC is denied information, but in book 2 you get every character's specific details, as other characters who are more knowledgeable explain things to Serenity, who has been brainwashed by the government.

My "Amelia's Revolution" Steampunk short story has a white MC, but in the sequel the MC is Lenape, and I am going to write a part 3 with a black MC, and will most likely have a part 4 with another Lenape MC as well.

I have specifically been looking for more PoC books to read, by the way. So this thread will help!

Oh! And I have an upcoming short story in August which features a male black MC.

AKyber36
04-27-2013, 08:40 AM
I finished reading a book called Red Jade by David Huang not too long ago. It's the third book in the Detective Yu series about a NYPD Chinese-American cop who grew up in Chinatown and who knows a lot about the Triads and Tongs. It's crime, dabbles in noir, and reads somewhat like a mystery/thriller. Majority of the protagonists and important secondaries are PoC (dominantly Chinese), so it's a nice take on usual mystery/crime fiction. I also love that the MC is a Chinese-American male who's just so human and not a stereotype.

Second recommendation: Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson. A pinnacle of cyberpunk fiction, and I also got interested by the MC. Hiro Protagonist is half black, half Japanese computer geek/genius who deals with a very serious issue in the cyber-world. He starts out being a mafia pizza boy, which was already awesome, and the novel's plain fun. Another character is Aleutian, which was also a welcome surprise.

Third recommendation: The Takeshi Kovacs cyber-noir series by Richard Morgan. The MC is Slavic-Japanese, and the whole system of "sheathing" effectively deals with race and identity. The MC even has a moment when he has to reconcile himself again to being Slavic-Japanese but his sheath doesn't look like what he would be. I found it intriguing, and Tak Kovacs basically reads as a jaded and cynical hard man in a brutal world. Might not be to everyone's taste because there are some extremely macho moments in the series that make you eyeroll (or Tak's holding the idiot ball), but I like it.

Silver-Midnight
04-27-2013, 08:56 AM
Even though I've only read two of her books so far (due to lack of time), and those were The Ice Cream Girls and Goodnight, Beautiful, I highly recommend Dorothy Koomson. She's a really good writer. She typically writes with having at least one black female protagonist from what I've seen; a lot of her books feature interracial relationships too. The genre of her books are typically Chick Lit but there are some Mystery or Suspense elements too sometimes.

Polenth
04-27-2013, 05:29 PM
I'd suggest we have a separate thread for people to recommend their own work. It's a lot harder for people to step into a thread of mainly recommendations, which will mainly be the big authors, and plug their own work. And I don't think we're trying to make it hard.

(I do have some recommendations, but I'll post them a bit later once I've sorted them.)

aruna
04-28-2013, 11:46 AM
I really enjoyed the "Marriage Bureau for Rich People" series! It's light reading, but very moving; set in South India, it has an all-Indian cast and you can learn a lot about the relationships between Hindus and Moslems beyond the usual cliches. These are shortish, amusing, sometimes painful books about everyday Indian life.

That said, I have my perennial favourites, which are Rohinton Mistry's A Fine Balance and Family Matters, as well as Vikram Seth's A Suitable Boy. And many others to many to mention, but I will over time.

And don't forget my own books! My first novel Of Marriageable Age is going to be released very soon as a self-published ebook, edited and revised and made much better than in the first HarperCollins edition. My editor back then could have done a MUCH better job, I discovered on re-reading it after 10 years! I'll announce the "launch" when it happens.

Silver-Midnight
04-28-2013, 07:46 PM
Amy Tan is also a favorite of mine. She typically writes Chinese/Chinese-American culture. I haven't gotten a chance to read much more of her books. However, what I have read, I did like.

Kim Fierce
04-30-2013, 12:59 AM
I would really like to read the ones AKyber listed, especially Snow Crash, sounds awesome!

slhuang
09-06-2013, 06:17 AM
Polenth, I hope you don't mind me reccing that great blog post you just wrote here:

100 Diverse Speculative Authors (http://blog.polenthblake.com/2013/09/100-diverse-speculative-authors.html)


So here are a hundred speculative fiction authors with some work in English. They are diverse in various ways including (but not limited to) sex, gender, class, sexuality, race, religion, country of origin, disability and neurotypicality.I want all these books right now. :D

Yorkist
09-06-2013, 06:38 AM
I mostly read SF/F and historical fiction:


Amy Tan is also a favorite of mine. She typically writes Chinese/Chinese-American culture. I haven't gotten a chance to read much more of her books. However, what I have read, I did like.

Amy Tan is a favorite of mine, too! I've read every novel of hers (not the memoirs, though). Favorite is definitely The Bonesetter's Daughter, which is, IIRC, magical realism.

Lisa See is known for Snow Flower and the Secret Fan (historical fiction), also featuring Asian characters, and while it is a lovely book, by far my favorite of hers is Peony in Love (toes the line between magical realism and fantasy).

Alma Alexander's The Secrets of Jin-Shei, which I think I recommend once a week, is fantasy set in sort-of imperial China. Eight PoV characters, all women, 7 are Asian and one might be Russian or something, it's unclear. Nice reversal of the token trope!

Octavia Butler's Parable of the Sower (sci-fi, dystopian coming-of-age novel) is my favorite of hers so far, but I'm enjoying Dawn and look forward to Kindred.

Michelle Moran's Egyptian trilogy is fantastic historical fiction.

Chinua Achebe's books are modern contemporary and/or historical fiction set in Africa. He's obviously a genius. He, along with Naguib Mahfouz, are IIRC the only African writers to win the Nobel Prize for literature.

I haven't read one yet, but I'm looking forward to perusing Aruna's books when I have a chance. She's around here somewhere. Also chomping at the bit to read Nnedi Okorafor's Who Fears Death.

aruna
09-06-2013, 08:00 AM
I third Amy Tan, and also the novels of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, set in Nigeria.
I am actually more interested in the cultures represented by these novels than be the actual race of the characters -- I purposely seek such books out, as they are vastly underrepresented. Books such as Zadie Smith's White Teeth or Monica Ali's Brick Lane, set in London with multicultural characters, don't interest me much, but they did make a huge amount of noise when they were first released. It's as if the literary set will only accept "exotic" characters if they are seen through the prism of white Britain.

I haven't read one yet, but I'm looking forward to perusing Aruna's books when I have a chance. She's around here somewhere.

Thanks Yorkist! There have been some delays (for good reasons!) and I don't expect OMA to come out before November.

aruna
09-06-2013, 09:44 PM
Right now, I'm reading "Because we are -- a Novel of Haiti". it takes me right there, which is what a book should do. The proceeds of the novel are going to humanitarian projects in Haiti, so I particularly liked buying this one.

http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h266/arunadasi/haiti_zps69cc73de.jpg (http://s66.photobucket.com/user/arunadasi/media/haiti_zps69cc73de.jpg.html)

Polenth
09-07-2013, 02:28 AM
Polenth, I hope you don't mind me reccing that great blog post you just wrote here:

100 Diverse Speculative Authors (http://blog.polenthblake.com/2013/09/100-diverse-speculative-authors.html)

I want all these books right now. :D

I shamelessly plugged in the other thread, so I don't mind... ;) Though I do note it's a broad list, so not all the authors and characters will be PoC/non-white. Picking out some to get started that are both by PoC authors and about PoC characters:

Aliette de Bodard - On a Red Station, Drifting (novella)

Shweta Narayan - Nira and I (http://www.strangehorizons.com/2009/20090316/nira-and-i-f.shtml) (short story)

Nnedi Okorafor - Zahrah the Windseeker (young adult novel)

Drew Hayden Taylor - The Night Wanderer (young adult novel)

Sunflowerrei
09-07-2013, 11:29 AM
The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston--it's a memoir and it's been awhile since I read it, but Hong Kingston weaves in Chinese myths and fictional elements into the writing. I remember it as a lovely book and a great example of creative non-fiction.


Cane River by Lalita Tademy--novelized version of the author's family history, so...historical fiction-ish? Starts in pre-Civil War, French-speaking Louisiana on a plantation, tracing a family, mostly mother to daughter--from African-American slaves Elisabeth and her daughter Suzette to Suzette's half white daughter, who also has children with a white man and gets the family their own little farm after Emancipation, to Emilie, the first in the family to be educated.

Crescent by Diana Abu-Jaber. Sirine is a half-Iraqi chef working in a Lebanese restaurant in Los Angeles. She lives with her uncle, who teaches at the university with an Iraqi professor named Hanif. Sirine and Hanif become interested in each other. This book really gets into the Arab-American community and identity; the characters are absolutely real people.

aruna
09-13-2013, 09:30 PM
Just wanted to say that Because We Are, the book I recommended on post 15, is really, really good. And though it is written by a white man, he gets the characters (the MC is a young Haitian girl) spot on. And not a white person plunging in to save the day in sight! IN fact, not a single white character up to now (halfway). Whites are mentioned now and then, but they are just the blancs. I love the use of French creole, loving guessing the original of words like dyab and dako and translating the Haitian chapter quotes!

I do have some quibbles about the structure and style, however. I don't like the jumping back and forth in time when the characters are the same kids just a few years apart. And mixed present and past tense. And dashes instead of quotation marks (always hated that).

I'm old enough to remember the sinister Papa Doc times and the Tonton Macoute and that whole spirit pervades the book. So if you like me you like books that show you another country, go for this one!

Silver-Midnight
09-14-2013, 07:57 PM
Amy Tan is a favorite of mine, too! I've read every novel of hers (not the memoirs, though). Favorite is definitely The Bonesetter's Daughter, which is, IIRC, magical realism.

I'm reading that right now actually. I think I'm about half way and I am thoroughly enjoying it. I just wish I had more free time to read it. :Shrug: (I'm in university/college.)

--

I also recommend Alice Walker. I read The Color Purple a little while back and I enjoyed it.

I really want to read some Octavia Butler books when I do find the time.

I read a shorty story by Toni Morrison. However, I didn't enjoy that as much as I thought I would honestly. However, she also writes a lot of POC characters and even tends to use magical realism in her books as well, if I remember correctly.

Lavern08
09-14-2013, 10:00 PM
Cane River by Lalita Tademy--novelized version of the author's family history...

OMG! - I totally forgot about this ^

Read it years ago, and it was fascinating. ;)

Sunflowerrei
09-15-2013, 08:15 AM
OMG! - I totally forgot about this ^

Read it years ago, and it was fascinating. ;)

She wrote a follow up called Red River, about her father's side of the family but I haven't read it.

Rachel Udin
09-29-2013, 12:27 AM
I just found a list...
http://www.reads4pleasure.com/2010/12/colorful-chick-lit-challenge.html

PoC Chick Lit, yay. (BTW, Chick Lit I define as more career-oriented than Romance and often played to be funny. The main struggle is often balancing work and romance. Not so much how many stereotypical things about women can you cram in....)

Corinne Duyvis
09-29-2013, 01:12 PM
Polenth, I hope you don't mind me reccing that great blog post you just wrote here:

100 Diverse Speculative Authors (http://blog.polenthblake.com/2013/09/100-diverse-speculative-authors.html)

I want all these books right now. :D

Yes! Fabulous post (and not just because I'm on it). Thanks, Polenth :)

This week, I finished The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson, which was a really intriguing read. It's speculative YA that deals with race, disability, and queerness in pretty explicit ways. I love that it's actually addressed rather than saying "the characters are X and Y and now we will never mention this again, it has no impact on their lives whatsoever, these are not the droids you're looking forrrr."

KidCassandra
10-10-2013, 08:45 AM
Octavia Butler is one of my favorites. My favorite is Fledgling, but that doesn't quite fit these requirements because, iirc, only the protag was a POC. I just read Kindred, however, and enjoyed that.

Try Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina Garcia, a book about several generations of Cuban women dealing with the revolution and loss of culture upon emigrating to the US.

Or So Far from God, by Ana Castillo, a magical realism novel set in a New Mexico chicano community.

My favorite recent read was The Grass Dancer, by Susan Power, a book set on a Dakota Indian reservation.

EMaree
10-10-2013, 12:25 PM
SANCTUM by Sarah Fine is YA urban fantasy with a POC main character. And, rarity of rarities in YA, the cover clearly shows it.

Anna L.
10-11-2013, 12:55 PM
Servant of the Underworld by Aliette de Bodard is an Aztec novel with no white people at all. I very much liked it. Don't look at the reviews though. Way too many people complain the authentic deity names are unpronounceable. I guess they wanted the author to rename the entire pantheon just for them.

Mr Flibble
11-14-2013, 08:38 PM
I noticed this thread aggges ago, and while reading my current book I thought of it again

Mothership, Tales of Afrofuturism and Beyond (http://www.rosariumpublishing.com/rosarium-books-mothership.html).

It's an absolutely cracking anthology, with more stories than you can shake a stick it. I'm not quite finished yet, but all the MCs so far have been POC. I thoroughly recommend it if you like SFF

Corinne Duyvis
11-14-2013, 08:43 PM
This Saturday I attended a reading with the editor and two of the anthology's authors. Fabulous, thoughtful discussion. Smart and wonderful people involved in this.

Kim Fierce
11-15-2013, 01:44 AM
I just got a book the other day and now I have to look up the title because I forget it. But it's an anthology of short stories all written by people of Chinese origin. Some of the writers live in different countries now, but have Chinese heritage. I'll have to get more details, it has something about Dragons in the title.

Kim Fierce
01-04-2014, 02:47 AM
I finally have my cover for Nadine's Voyage!
And it's going to be released in February instead of April!


It's on my home page: http://kimflowersbooks.weebly.com

Roxxsmom
01-05-2014, 10:39 AM
I finally have my cover for Nadine's Voyage!
And it's going to be released in February instead of April!


It's on my home page: http://kimflowersbooks.weebly.com

Congrats! That's a very nice cover.

To add some titles to the older thread:

Alice Walker was one of my favorite authors when I was growing up. I learned a lot reading her books.

I second the recommendations for Amy Tan.

Isabel Allande. I read the House of the Voices ages ago (on of my co-workers at the time was from Chile and recommended it), and the writing was beautiful (plus I learned about a time in that county's history that they weren't teaching us in college classes back then).

As for purely speculative fiction/fantasy: NK Jemison.

aruna
01-05-2014, 11:51 AM
I agree -- beautiful cover, Kim.

aruna
01-05-2014, 11:54 AM
I recently read Monsoon Memories by Renita D'Silva and loved it so much I checked out her publisher and in the end signed with them for my up-and-coming e-book!
Here's the cover:
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pshtjTSrL._SY344_PJlook-inside-v2,TopRight,1,0_SH20_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

kikazaru
01-05-2014, 10:35 PM
I generally only read mystery/suspense and I love the "Jim Chee" and "Joe Leaphorn" novels by the late Tony Hillerman. They are both Navajo tribal policemen and the mystery usually has some aspect of tribal culture woven in.

While I really enjoy Walter Mosely's "Easy Rawlins"as MC, I've recently discovered another of his series with "Leonid McGill" both are African American MC's and the books are great - gritty and atmospheric.

I've also read a few in a series by Leslie Glass with "April Woo" a female Chinese NYC police lieutenant. These are fun as well.

aruna
03-04-2014, 06:50 PM
My own novel Of Marriageable Age (VERY multicultural cast) is coming out in digital format next Friday, and we (Publisher and I) are looking for reviewers who would like a free digital copy. If that's you, do send me a pm with your email address!
You can find out more about the book on amazon, goodreads and on my website, see my sig.

Kim Fierce
03-15-2014, 05:04 AM
I have a cover for Strong Arrow's Warpath which can be viewed here (http://www.queerteen-press.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=24&products_id=130). It will be published in April.

psyche24
04-01-2014, 04:50 PM
I would like to add the 'Rivers of London.' series by Ben Aaronovitch. It is an urban fantasy series with an MC with a Nigerian mother. The series also has minor characters who are POC

Sunflowerrei
05-11-2014, 09:56 AM
Resurrecting this thread to add:
Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet and Songs of Willow Frost by Jamie Ford

Evaine
05-12-2014, 09:18 PM
The Rivers of London series is great - but Peter Grant's mother comes from Sierra Leone, not Nigeria.
I also love that the spirit of the River Thames (or at least the bit nearest the sea) was once a Nigerian nurse who threw herself in, and so all the tributaries, her daughters, are also black women.
Ben Aaronovitch gets the Metropolitan Police spot on, too, coppers first and multi-racial second.

Putputt
05-12-2014, 09:43 PM
How did I not know this thread exists! My favs...

Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
Most of Amy Tan's books
All of Khaled Hosseini's books

MG/YA
Walk Two Moons by ummm...I have no idea and am too lazy to look it up :D
Dualed by Elsie Chapman

Umm...I guess that's all I can think of. :-/

Ken
05-14-2014, 05:16 AM
"If He Hollers Let Him Go," Chester Himes - 1945

Sunflowerrei
03-08-2015, 09:55 AM
Gosh, it's been ages since anybody updated this thread, huh? *creeps into zombie thread* I have a few more recs.

Our very own SL Huang's short story Hunting Monsters should be in here.

I just finished reading Oleander Girl by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni--I'd call it women's fiction maybe, but definitely a coming-of-age themed book with a mostly Indian cast of characters.

Just started reading Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie---Nigerian lead characters.

Has anybody mentioned Lisa See yet? I read her family history book On Gold Mountain in January (I have a fixation with complicated multiracial family sagas) and her novels all have Chinese characters.

Black Rain--well, it's a translation of a Japanese novel about the bombing of Hiroshima and its aftermath, so, duh, all the characters are Japanese

Bridge of Scarlet Leaves by Kristina McMorris is about a white American woman who marries a Japanese-American just as Pearl Harbor is bombed and thus, she and her husband endure Japanese internment.

aruna
03-08-2015, 12:28 PM
I just finished reading Oleander Girl by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni--I'd call it women's fiction maybe, I've read many of her books, and loved them mostly.


Just started reading Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie---Nigerian lead characters.

Hmmm. Mixed feelings about this one. I MUCH preferred her Half of a Yellow Sun and Purple Hibiscus and even her book of short stories, That Thing around your Neck (even though I don't usually read short stories). Amerikanah was -- I don't know. I just didn't like it much. Apart from that, she's one of my favourite writers!


Has anybody mentioned Lisa See yet? I read her family history book On Gold Mountain in January (I have a fixation with complicated multiracial family sagas) and her novels all have Chinese characters.

Yes. I read and loved Snow Flower and the Secret Fan but hated Shanghai Girls. I have another of her books on my Kindle but am reluctant to start it.


Then there's always my latest, the book you see in my avatar! Only 2 or 3 named white characters in the whole book!

I'd like to recommend Renita d'Silva, whose book Monsoon Memories was so delightful I checked out the publisher and was eventually taken on by them, the turning point in my writing career! She has published two more books since then, and all have great reviews. Indian characters, mostly Indian settings.

Jack McManus
03-10-2015, 11:37 AM
Fire in Beulah, by Rilla Askew, has Two MC's, one white, one black. A third character, a Freedman midwife, appears at crucial points throughout the story with her own POV. The author has stated she tried to give equal weight to the "three founding races" (her words) of Oklahoma.

The story revolves around Oklahoma's oil boom at the start of the last century, climaxing with a vivid account of the 1921 Tulsa race war.

Sunflowerrei
03-16-2015, 10:18 AM
Corona by Bushra Rehman--a Pakistani-American female first-person MC. It's a contemporary novel, written more as episodic short stories, and I remember really enjoying the humor in it. Plus, some of it takes place in Corona, a neighborhood in Queens, where I'm from.

bombergirl69
03-21-2015, 08:20 PM
Hi, what a wonderful thread. My husband is NA, so we are pretty interested in NA writing.

I am new here and did not see two terrific novels (MCs = POC). One is Yes is Better Than No, a novel about members of a southwestern Indian tribe trying to live in Tucson. It covers the (sometimes) well intentioned,but grossly inappropriate white interactions, particuarly those with social workers, as well as sexploitation issues (one character figures he can land white women if he calls himself "Flaming Arrow", which happens, with an interesting interaction highlighting the whole sexualizing of NAs). Written by a white woman - Byrd Baylor - but is just a fantastic read for anyone interested in racial issues. Written in the 1970s but highly relevant.

Also, anything by James Welsh, who was Blackfeet. His book, Fool's Crow, is a gorgeous young man's coming-of-age story set in the 1870s. Just beautifully written, covers one of two of the massacres and their impact. A sprinkling of white folk but they are all secondary

Of course, anything by Louise Erdrich!

Anyway, really interesting to think about these issues and writing.

kevinwaynewilliams
04-03-2015, 09:30 AM
Well, I always recommend pretty much anything by Samuel R. Delaney when this comes up.

Out of self interest, though, I will also recommend one of the current finalists at Foreword Reviews under both the horror (https://indiefab.forewordreviews.com/books/everything-i-know-about-zombies-i-learned-in-kindergarten/) and multicultural categories, featuring a primarily black and Hispanic cast, my own Everything I Know About Zombies, I Learned in Kindergarten (http://www.motthavenbooks.com). Gets good reviews (http://www.motthavenbooks.com/kwwilliams/reviews), too.

Alpha Echo
04-27-2015, 11:09 PM
I didn't read this entire thread, so my apologies if this one has been mentioned already, but I recently read a fantastic, beautifully written novel with POC MCs - The Sweetest Hallelujah, by Elaine Hussey.

It's set back in 1955 and centers around a POC woman - an ex jazz singer - who is dying from cancer and wants to find someone to care for her daughter. She puts an ad in the newspaper, not really hoping for much, but a middle-class white woman finds the ad. Before they know it, their lives are intersecting in ways they never imagined (I can't give it away!!!).

It's simply beautiful. The friendship the two women form brought tears to my eyes more than once.

autumnleaf
05-14-2015, 07:07 PM
I really enjoyed Anita Amirrezvani's historical novels, The Blood of Flowers and Equal to the Sun, set in 16th and 17th century Iran.

Nobody's mention Neil Gaiman's Ananzi Boys yet? Most of the cast are Afro-Caribbean.

Like Aruna, I wasn't crazy about Adiche's Americanah, but I've loved everything else she's written, especially Half of a Yellow Sun. I would also really recommend that you google "adichie danger of a single story" and watch that video: it's an amazing talk.

lianna williamson
05-14-2015, 10:24 PM
I'm going to give a shout for Rick Riordan's MG Kane Chronicles trilogy, about descendants of ancient Egyptian priests dealing with Egyptian gods running amok in the U.S. The MC's are a biracial brother-and-sister pair, who are have very different experiences of being biracial (one "reads" as black to others, while the other reads as white). The siblings' African-American father and uncle are also both characters, the sister's love interest is African-American, and the brother's is middle eastern. All the white folks are bit players.

LJD
05-14-2015, 10:26 PM
I read a number of diverse romances lately, and these were the ones I liked best:

A Gentleman in the Street - Alisha Rai
A Bollywood Affair - Sonali Dev
His Road Home - Anna Richland
Captive Bride - Bonnie Dee

Also, Jeannie Lin has written some good historical romances set in China.

jtrylch13
05-30-2015, 06:47 AM
Recently read The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo and absolutely loved it. It's magical realism and sold as an adult novel, but I think could be a crossover with YA. It's set in colonial Malaya in the late nineteenth century and is about a young Chinese woman and her search for love and her fight to determine her own life path. Really loved this one.

Kitty27
05-31-2015, 01:15 AM
Great recoomendations, y'all!

I plan on buying a few. Well,a LOT is more right.

Tocotin
05-31-2015, 02:23 PM
Some time ago, I read The Good Lord Bird by James McBride, and loved it. It's a pre-Civil War historical fiction about John Brown, but the protagonist (who is also the narrator) is a young Black boy, and most characters are Black.

jtrylch13
06-01-2015, 07:03 PM
Also reading right now The Wrath and the Dawn by Renee Ahdieh. I think it is a Fantasy world, but reads like a historical fiction with an Arabian setting and is a YA re-telling of Arabian Nights. All characters are Arabian except one who is Thebian and one who is Moorish. Pretty good so far. A few things I'm not totally pleased with, but diverse in character and setting and well written.

LJD
06-22-2015, 04:38 PM
I really liked Crazy Rich Asians (Kevin Kwan).

autumnleaf
06-22-2015, 09:39 PM
Does anyone know the race of the title character in Marissa Meyer's Cinder (book 1 of the Lunar Chronicles)? I saw her as Asian, or possibly mixed white/Asian, but she is described ambiguously.

The heroine of book 4, Winter (due out Nov 2015) is definitely black according to her brief appearance in book 3.

aruna
10-01-2015, 08:33 PM
Well, today is the launch of The Secret Life of Winnie Cox! See my avatar for the new cover! Reviews already on amazon, and on blogs. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Secret-Life-Winnie-Cox-spellbinding-ebook/dp/B014R2JUTI/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1443716237&sr=1-1&keywords=winnie+cox

and another great review here: http://shazsbookboudoir.blogspot.co.uk/2015/09/emmas-guest-review-sharon-maas-secret.html?m=1

danatcsimpson
10-02-2015, 02:19 AM
Alaya Dawn Johnson! The Summer Prince is set in a dystopian Brazil with all of the non-white faces that entails.

Sunflowerrei
10-09-2015, 11:27 AM
I'm reading two right now: AW's own SL Huang's Root of Unity.
The Country of Ice Cream Star by Sandra Newman
The Scarlet Kimono by Christina Courtney--haven't read it, but it's up next on my TBR.
And not to toot my own horn, but Pearl has a POC MC.

Maze Runner
10-24-2015, 09:52 PM
Currently reading Maya Angelou and Walter Mosley.

Sunflowerrei
11-06-2015, 10:01 PM
I've read The Scarlet Kimono and then went on to finish the trilogy with The Gilded Fan and The Jade Lioness by Christina Courtenay. They are historical romances with huge doses of adventure and action, taking place in the 17th century in England (the first book starts there and ends in Japan, the second book starts in Japan and takes place in England during the Civil War, and the third takes place in Dejima and other places in Japan).

aruna
01-24-2016, 12:13 PM
I've just finished reading Queen Sugar (http://nataliebaszile.com/book/), in hardback, no less! The race of the MC is so subtly brought into the story I didn't even realise she was black until much later -- which was an extra plus. as I was reading the book more for research than for anything else! The writer is also black. On her website it says that the book is being adapted for a TV series. It's a wonderful book, though maybe a bit slow for modern tastes. So well written it could be a contender for a major prize. The cover is interesting. The hardback cover (http://www.amazon.com/Queen-Sugar-Novel-Natalie-Baszile/dp/0670026131) does not have a person on the cover so you can't tell it's a "black book". I think that's good. I'm warming to the idea that you can maybe only get significant numbers of white readers if you don't let them know the MC is black. Draw them in by other means and wow them with the story, charterers and writing. The paperback has black silhouettes.

danatcsimpson
02-09-2016, 01:47 AM
I just started Malinda Lo's Huntress, whose protagonists are fantasy-Japanese. The mashup with fantasy-Celtic sidhe mythology was a little jarring at first, but it works. Plus lesbians! Elves and lesbians and characters of color written by an author of color. Three great tastes that taste great together.

ManInBlack
02-12-2016, 12:52 AM
I really enjoyed the "Marriage Bureau for Rich People" series! It's light reading, but very moving; set in South India, it has an all-Indian cast and you can learn a lot about the relationships between Hindus and Moslems beyond the usual cliches. These are shortish, amusing, sometimes painful books about everyday Indian life.



Ah, I knew there would be something I could use for research in this thread!

Sunflowerrei
02-15-2016, 09:50 PM
I just finished Tidewater by Libbie Hawker, which is historical fiction based on the Pocahontas story, though the novel is far more accurate to what actually happened than anything conjured up by Disney. Pocahontas is a little girl when the English begin settling Jamestown and she befriends them, learns English, and is a particular friend of John Smith. Smith is a viewpoint character, but so are Pocahontas and her uncle Opechancanough and the majority of the story belongs to them.

autumnleaf
05-24-2016, 09:13 PM
Zoo City by South African writer Lauren Beukes. Urban fantasy set in Johannesburg.

hester
05-24-2016, 10:19 PM
Imani All Mine, by Connie Rose Porter. It may be out of print (I took it out of the library a few years ago), but it's terrific. The MC is a fifteen year old who gets pregnant and...I'll just say it's a heartbreaker.

uhstevedude
05-27-2016, 05:32 AM
I've started a Supernatural/Urban Fantasy Web Serial featuring a black male MC who does magic that's loosely associated with Ng'aka and Sub-saharan African sorcery. Magic is based on culture and human concepts too, so don't be suprised to see a Pyromancer using Sex-powered Brujeria or a Hydromancer using Conquest-powered Indigenous Shamanism. (Rough examples) https://ethnicmagic.wordpress.com/

Snitchcat
07-05-2016, 08:14 PM
Not sure how much of his works have been translated into English, but you might like Louis Cha's The Deer and the Cauldron -- historical Imperial politics fantasy set in Ancient(ish) China. Protagonist is a smart-mouthed low-born Chinese guy who smooth-talks his way into the Forbidden City. The story follows his shennanigans in the Imperial court.

For those who would like to read more about fantastical martial arts in historical China, you might like Ode to Gallantry -- the (short-ish) series revolves around identical twins who're mistaken for each other (a lot). One twin is a naive but kind-hearted man; the other is an infamous rich jerk. The former is kidnapped and taught Kung Fu by Master Xie Yanke. The latter gets into all kinds of trouble. As the story evolves, various sects are introduced, and the twins are central to all of them. They end up on a mysterious island that reveals a lot about everything, but the story doesn't conclude there.

aruna
07-27-2016, 03:19 PM
I've just finished reading Queen Sugar (http://nataliebaszile.com/book/), in hardback, no less! The race of the MC is so subtly brought into the story I didn't even realise she was black until much later -- which was an extra plus. as I was reading the book more for research than for anything else! The writer is also black. On her website it says that the book is being adapted for a TV series. It's a wonderful book, though maybe a bit slow for modern tastes. So well written it could be a contender for a major prize. The cover is interesting. The hardback cover (http://www.amazon.com/Queen-Sugar-Novel-Natalie-Baszile/dp/0670026131) does not have a person on the cover so you can't tell it's a "black book". I think that's good. I'm warming to the idea that you can maybe only get significant numbers of white readers if you don't let them know the MC is black. Draw them in by other means and wow them with the story, charterers and writing. The paperback has black silhouettes.

I've heard that this book -- Queen Sugar -- has now been filmed for TV. Good -- can't wait to see it.

Also my latest book. which is in my avatar, is now out and available.

Lionscourt
09-24-2016, 03:24 AM
Not sure if anyone's mentioned Steven Barnes here. Streetlethal and Blood Brothers are but a couple of his books featuring POC's. I really liked The Descent of Anansi.

My contribution is below. I grew up reading fantasy and sci fi and there is a dearth of PoC's in fantasy.



https://www.amazon.com/No-Trail-Behind-Gary-Ray/dp/0986276200/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1474659613&sr=8-1&keywords=no+trail+behind+me

Urban fantasy with multicultural (african/native am) teen girl main character.

LeftyLucy
09-24-2016, 03:50 AM
I recently read Brown Girl Dreaming, by Jacqueline Woodson. It was marvelous.

I also don't think I saw The Twelve Tribes of Hattie, by Ayana Mathis, on this thread. Another great one.

Susannah Shepherd
09-24-2016, 08:11 AM
Anything by Patricia Grace or Witi Ihimaera is guaranteed to be a good read with predominantly Māori characters. Huia Publishing (http://www.huia.co.nz/huia-bookshop/bookshop/) also publish high-quality fiction by Māori and Pasifika writers (not all of which has a POC theme).

My personal favourites are 'Tū' by Patricia Grace, set during WWII and post-war years, and 'The Whale Rider' by Witi Ihimaera (made into a movie about 10 years ago), which is a great story about the clash of generations over the role of women as leaders.