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View Full Version : Rush hour at the nest box (Pic of my chickens)



Fenika
04-07-2013, 07:38 PM
http://i1204.photobucket.com/albums/bb408/fenika3/B8657E3D-506A-437C-B08F-E15F99B10489-761-000001ABA479E9F9.jpg

Clockwise from the back: Snow, Pepper, and Frightful.

Not pictured is Coal, who decided she could wait til after rush hour to use the nest box. There are four boxes, but all four will lay in the same place.

Frightful and Pepper are broody so a bit grumpy. Grumpy chickens are hilarious :D

Maryn
04-07-2013, 08:42 PM
Before somebody comes in and demands it, might I suggest you resize the image to meet with AW's limit of 400 x 400 pixels, or about the same area if it's not square? Wouldn't want to ruffle any feathers, yuk-yuk.

Some good-lookin' chicks there, BTW. I'm partial to Pepper.

Maryn, not this board's mod

Fenika
04-07-2013, 08:58 PM
Hmmm... How would I do this within the code? Preferably as a %...

Fenika
04-07-2013, 09:00 PM
Also, Pepper is adorable. If you want a laugh, here's her Velociraptor impersonation. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMrEUY19MT4

Liralen
04-07-2013, 09:26 PM
What kind of chickens are they?

Years ago we had some bantams. They were characters! And the eggs were really good, too.

Fenika
04-07-2013, 09:43 PM
Frightful is a banty Silkie Polish who knows cross. She has the silkie feet, regular feathers, and the Polish tophat. Pepper is her daughter and a throwback to the silkie feathers. Snow and Coal are Barred Rocks. Snow was going to be dinner but my mom insisted I have four laying hens, lucky gal. (I bought NH Reds and Barred Rocks as a dual purpose flock. I was going to raise Black Stars from them but I decided to eat all the roosters and half the hens instead...) (end morbid side note)

Liralen
04-07-2013, 10:09 PM
Maybe it was motivation for the rest to be good layers ;)

Fenika
04-07-2013, 10:10 PM
Pretty much :D Though Snow didnt lay her first egg until well into the winter. At least she didnt wait til Spring.

Liralen
04-07-2013, 10:32 PM
The two white ducks we had were over-achievers; some days they'd lay more than one each.

Fenika
04-07-2013, 11:03 PM
Wow! Good ducks!

Liralen
04-08-2013, 01:43 AM
It was always fun to throw leftover spaghetti noodles out in the backyard for them. They thought they'd hit the motherlode of worms, lol!

Fenika
04-08-2013, 03:34 AM
:ROFL:

I almost never eat pasta since I'm on a GF, corn free diet, but I'll remember that. Maybe I'll cook them some as a treat. They would totally jump for the noodles too, so entertainment value alone would be worth it.

Liralen
04-08-2013, 05:30 AM
I'm GF too :) And very low carb. I function so much better with very limited carbs!

My splurge is Mexican food every now and then -- those damned chips and salsa . . . the place I go makes the best aguacate.

Fenika
04-08-2013, 01:12 PM
Mexican is right out, unfortunately. I love Indian though. Curries ftw.

Liralen
04-08-2013, 06:28 PM
No good Indian food around here, except for one place in Knoxville, an hour away -- and if I'm going there, well, there's this WONDERFUL little place, Cairo Cafe, that serves Mediterranean, and it's easy to avoid gluten and over splurging on carbs there.

Until I get to that damned Turkish coffee. Carbs? Who cares? :D

*we need a GF group!*

Fenika
04-08-2013, 06:33 PM
Start a food allergy thread in the cooking forum. I've seen misc threads on certain topics but never a group that I recall :)

And then we can talk chicken recipes, lol

Gilroy Cullen
04-08-2013, 07:20 PM
Chickies!
Oh, I wish I could have featherheads where I live... Too many stray dogs, not to mention my five cats...


The two black ones remind me of Australorpes.

Fenika
04-08-2013, 07:26 PM
Get Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens and then implement All The Defenses.

I have a dig skirt around the run And coop. A tri level scare wire. And most the run has netting over it. I also leave a trap (havaheart) set near a narrow spot where predators might go while circling the run. Recently I caught a skunk, but was able to release it without even the threat of being sprayed (carry a sheet and move slow). We have too many skunks and they love to see if they can get a chicken.

So far no break ins or losses though.

AZ_Dawn
04-08-2013, 10:14 PM
Okay, I've gotta ask this because my Dad's thinking about getting 4 or 5 hens (yes, we can have hens in the city limits). What are chickens as pets like? Dad sort of knows what he's doing, since he helped with the chickens when he was a kid. I have a cousin who raised chickens for 4-H, and swears her chickens were really sweet. My oldest nephew really liked a very tolerant hen at a petting zoo that let him carry her around. But my eldest sister, who once worked as a custodian at an Old West theme park, says she saw the park's free range chickens kill baby bunnies, so I don't know what to expect from them.

And what kind of dog would you recommend for a chicken owner? (Yes, I'm still hoping to convince them we need a dog!:snoopy:) I'm sure hounds, terriers, and retrievers are out of the question, but perhaps a smallish herding dog?

Wicked
04-08-2013, 11:00 PM
Nice looking brood you've got there, Fenika. :D


We've got some Black australorp. Very sweet hens. My daughter carries them around.

I love my Araucana. Also very sweet.

We have a few White Rock. Mean. Mean. Mean.

Over the years or babies have gotten pretty mixed, with some bantam thrown in.
The ones that are obviously White Rock descent? Still rotten little snots.


We also have ducks and guineas, but your neighbors would hate you if you get guineas. They're one step below a peacock, as far as noise goes.
http://imageshack.us/a/img155/2467/cimg2284.th.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/155/cimg2284.jpg/)
http://imageshack.us/a/img85/8200/capnt.th.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/85/capnt.jpg/)

Fenika
04-08-2013, 11:03 PM
Any herding dog will herd and then kill a chicken. Even if it only nips and you dont see a mark, the bacteria in a dog or cats mouth will kill a bird. If you must mix to a degree, adopt an older dog who doesnt get excited by anything and still supervise.

There are breeds of chickens that are very friendly and if also handled daily from peeps will do great. My barely handled Barred Rocks run up to me for food and will tolerate being caught and handled.

Fenika
04-08-2013, 11:12 PM
Wicked- cheers :) I used to have guineas, but then I ate them!

Among other things, I'd like to have a better set up before trying meat birds again (except maybe small numbers). The more they can forage, the less I pay for feed...

Luckily for laying hens, we don't mind building a $500 coop and awaiting that first backyard egg ;)

AZ_Dawn
04-09-2013, 01:08 AM
Thanks, Fenika!


Any herding dog will herd and then kill a chicken. Even if it only nips and you dont see a mark, the bacteria in a dog or cats mouth will kill a bird. If you must mix to a degree, adopt an older dog who doesnt get excited by anything and still supervise.
Guess that leaves out heel nippers like corgis. And shelties, too; they're excitable into their old age!

I don't think there would be much mixing, though; the chickens would be in their own fenced off part of the yard. If they and the dog did mix, it would be because someone opened the gate and the dog slipped in or the chickens ran out. In that case, we wouldn't want a dog that immediately thought, "Chicken season!"


There are breeds of chickens that are very friendly and if also handled daily from peeps will do great. My barely handled Barred Rocks run up to me for food and will tolerate being caught and handled. That's good to know; I've got 3 young nephews and wouldn't want them to be constantly pecked. Yes, we would supervise them with the chickens.

Liralen
04-09-2013, 01:40 AM
Any herding dog will herd and then kill a chicken. Even if it only nips and you dont see a mark, the bacteria in a dog or cats mouth will kill a bird. If you must mix to a degree, adopt an older dog who doesnt get excited by anything and still supervise.

There are breeds of chickens that are very friendly and if also handled daily from peeps will do great. My barely handled Barred Rocks run up to me for food and will tolerate being caught and handled.

You'd have loved the GSD I had when we had the chickens and ducks. They could be out in the yard with him, he never let anything happen to them. It was actually easier on him when we started letting them out, as they'd escape from their pen into the yard every now and then and it upset him terribly. He'd do his best to herd them back and often would wind up holding one of them down gently, with his mouth over them, crying for someone to come help him, lol. Once it was okay for them to be out in the yard he didn't have to worry so much.

He was quick death on rats and snakes though!

They all got to acting like dogs -- if someone drove up into the driveway you'd hear an awful racket, look out there and there'd be the GSD, the Corgi mix, the Rat Terrier, big yellow tom cat, ducks, rooster and sometimes one of the hens all lined up barking, yowling, crowing and squawking at the interloper.

Fenika
04-09-2013, 02:01 AM
Thanks, Fenika!


Guess that leaves out heel nippers like corgis. And shelties, too; they're excitable into their old age!

I don't think there would be much mixing, though; the chickens would be in their own fenced off part of the yard. If they and the dog did mix, it would be because someone opened the gate and the dog slipped in or the chickens ran out. In that case, we wouldn't want a dog that immediately thought, "Chicken season!"

That's good to know; I've got 3 young nephews and wouldn't want them to be constantly pecked. Yes, we would supervise them with the chickens.

There are rare exceptions to any breed, but since strong instincts have been bred in, I would start with a more likely breed.

Of course, training is always important, starting on a leash and through a fence. And keep in mind that behaviors can change. I had a LGD who was a bit timid but VERY friendly with people. I soon found out that she would DIVE for and chase rabbits. Any rabbit. Well on our evening walks we almost always came across a rabbit in this one patch of grass we walked past.

I taught her, progressively to ignore the rabbit as we went past it a few times (the rabbit didn't bolt far). I then taught her that if we approached the rabbit that she had to stay at or behind my side. Whenever she got really low and focused I made her sit and relax and we'd go again.

Long story short, in a few weeks I had her heeling, without the lead in my hand (she dragged it, something she was used to, and she knew if given permission she could run off for a ways with the lead at a gallop)... anyways, she would heel, lead dragging on the ground, and follow my lead exactly, with barely any interest in the rabbit. She'd sit and everything too.

When I moved to PA I got her pretty used to guinea fowl but didn't quite trust her with them.

I gave her to a lady with a farm and chickens.

A month later she had attacked three chickens, killing the last one :(

(And somehow this was all my fault. ffs. I'm a horse person more than a dog person, but I clearly understood more about dog training than this lady.)



They all got to acting like dogs -- if someone drove up into the driveway you'd hear an awful racket, look out there and there'd be the GSD, the Corgi mix, the Rat Terrier, big yellow tom cat, ducks, rooster and sometimes one of the hens all lined up barking, yowling, crowing and squawking at the interloper.

Youtube or it didn't happen!

And protective dogs are the best :)

Fenika
04-09-2013, 02:02 AM
PS- Backyardchickens.com for more info on chicken breeds. Roosters are a thousand more times likely to attack, even some of the nice breeds. But a nice, non-scaredy hen or few are priceless.

Liralen
04-09-2013, 02:15 AM
Youtube or it didn't happen!

And protective dogs are the best :)

I wish! I didn't even have a camera then :(

He had a possum he wanted to be friends with. He'd go find it, it would faint, he'd bring it up on the porch and try to get it to wake up and play. Then there was the neighbor's cow. He loved her. He'd stand at the fence and they'd lick each other's noses. All was well until the neighbor strung up a hot wire (the cow was pretty wild and broke down the fence regularly). Poor Purdue hit the wire and thought the cow had done it. Ended a beautiful friendship, lol. He wouldn't even look at her after that, just pretended she didn't exist.

He was a real throwback to the German Shepherd, but his parents were both farm bred dogs.

Wicked
04-09-2013, 02:34 AM
We have a six year old German Shepherd who spends all day outside with the chickens, and doesn't care. There were a couple of incidents when she was a puppy, though.

We also have a four year old German Shepherd mix. Lucia loves all the animals, but she also loves to chase. We always have to keep an eye on her.
As long as we're with her, she is really great with the babies.
http://imageshack.us/a/img832/5899/cimg2095f.jpg

The little stinker knows how to open the latch to the chicken pen. Not only does she open the gate so she can help herself to fresh eggs, she lets all the chickens out. :roll: