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ElaineA
03-19-2013, 11:23 PM
Another Latin question. Does spoken Latin differentiate good night and good evening like modern Italian? I have one person saying good night to another, but it's not "going to bed" good night, it's walking off into the evening. I asked Google for the good evening translation (bonum vesperum). Would that be correct? And, if so, is this the proper declension or conjugation or whatever it's called in Latin?

Finally, would any Latin expert be willing to tolerate the occasional PM for these kinds of questions or is it better to just post a thread?

Tibi gratiās maximās agō. (according to Google, anyway :))

King Neptune
03-19-2013, 11:34 PM
Another Latin question. Does spoken Latin differentiate good night and good evening like modern Italian? I have one person saying good night to another, but it's not "going to bed" good night, it's walking off into the evening. I asked Google for the good evening translation (bonum vesperum). Would that be correct? And, if so, is this the proper declension or conjugation or whatever it's called in Latin?

Finally, would any Latin expert be willing to tolerate the occasional PM for these kinds of questions or is it better to just post a thread?

Tibi gratiās maximās agō. (according to Google, anyway :))

I don't know whether they used "good evening", but it would have been in the vocative case, but I'm only about 75% confident on that. bono vespero

Whether that was a common expression makes no difference, because anyone who would know that would appreciate that "bono vespero" was a good and valid thing, that might have been said.

Rufus Coppertop
03-20-2013, 06:15 PM
Bonum vesperem habe is a possibility.

A good evening have.

accusative case for noun and adjective as they are the direct object of the verb. imperative mood for the verb.

GeorgeK
03-21-2013, 04:38 AM
The Romans were not exactly a punctuality obsessed people. I doubt that they would consider such an issue an issue.

ElaineA
03-21-2013, 05:32 AM
Things haven't changed much on the peninsula, then, I guess? ;)

Canotila
03-21-2013, 09:44 AM
How many people are being addressed?

Edit: And what time period are you writing in? Ancient Romans would have said salve (sawl-way) as a greeting, and used it for good morning and good evening as well. If they're addressing more than one person, it would be salvete.

You can use vale (wah-lay, or valete if more than one) as a goodbye. It works for good evening and good night as well. Bonum vesperum would have been used if someone was conversationally talking about the evening having a good quality about it.

sknox
03-26-2013, 08:34 PM
Canotila has it right.

BTW, if you're looking for some authenticity in dialog, read Roman plays, especially the comedies. Get a good translation. Then, if you really want to nail it, find a phrase you like, get a Loeb or other edition, and look up the original Latin as well. Silver Age stuff will be ideal. Don't bother with medieval, unless you're looking for something very specific and you understand the differences.