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View Full Version : Royalty Statements: You Don't Need Them



K. Victoria Chase
02-17-2013, 06:29 PM
I'm with a publisher who has decided to go against the language in the contract, that says authors will be provided monthly royalty statements, and not give us statements at all--just the check. This is now policy (That's another question I have. How to work around the contract by creating policy--for another thread). Reason being is the spreadsheet has just too much data with hundreds of line items because of so many third parties sellers, AND this publisher doesn't know of ANY publisher IN THE BUSINESS giving out individual statements to their authors. Some of us have asked for quarterly statements, which was suggested by the publisher, but it appears that that isn't what the publisher wants to do either. Publisher states they're working on a solution but it might not make everyone happy.

So I have to ask: Any other publishers come to mind that give royalty statements? This publisher wants to know...

firedrake
02-17-2013, 06:34 PM
My publisher, Total E-Bound sends out detailed royalty statements on the first working day of every month, come hell or high water. They also pay royalties on the first working day of each month, without fail.

I loves them, yes I does.

thethinker42
02-17-2013, 06:37 PM
So I have to ask: Any other publishers come to mind that give royalty statements? This publisher wants to know...

I get detailed statements from every single one of my publishers. Samhain Publishing, Riptide Publishing, Carnal Passions/Champagne Books, Loose Id, Evernight Publishing, Total-E-Bound, Amber Quill Press...all of them. Some are quarterly, some are monthly. Some spell out the sales from each third party site, a couple of them don't, but at the very least, I get the number of copies sold, the gross receipts, and the amount due to me.

If a company suddenly decided it was too much trouble to produce statements per their contracts, I'd be inclined to decide it was too much trouble to continue working with them.

suki
02-17-2013, 06:45 PM
So...they expect you to accept on faith that they accurately calculated what they owe you? And claim this is industry standard? <mind boggled>


Any other publishers come to mind that give royalty statements? Yes. In fact, I haven't heard of a legitimate publisher who doesn't give out royalty statements...has anyone else? (I'm actually curious, as I thought royalty statements were industry standard, even for the smallest micro presses).

But more importantly, they are violating their contracts. If the contracts say they have to give you one, they can't just "change policy" (unless the contract gives them that right, too) to avoid part of the contract. So, read the contract carefully. If it says you get one, then you get one.

And be very suspicious of any company that tells you they can not or will not account for how they have decided what they owe you. Very suspicious.

~suki

K. Victoria Chase
02-17-2013, 06:50 PM
Thank you for the quick responses, everyone. I really appreciate it. I've read and re-read the contract for that "we can change anything at anytime" clause and I haven't seen it, but I'll read it again--I might have missed it.

This publisher is expanding quickly and it sounds like they're struggling to stay ahead of the changes.

And yes, Suki, I guess I should just trust them. LOL. I do, but business is business and if money is exchanged, there needs to be an accounting for it. Here's hoping they decide on giving out numbers...

thethinker42
02-17-2013, 06:51 PM
Thank you for the quick responses, everyone. I really appreciate it. I've read and re-read the contract for that "we can change anything at anytime" clause and I haven't seen it, but I'll read it again--I might have missed it.

Call them out on it. Ask them to point you to the specific clause that allows them to do this.

Jersey Chick
02-17-2013, 07:06 PM
My publishers all issue royalty statements - Samhain and Musa Publishing provide monthly statements, while The Wild Rose Press issues them quarterly. All provide a database where I can go retrieve my statements at any time for any time period (which was very useful when my laptop crashed and burned a year ago.)

thothguard51
02-17-2013, 07:10 PM
If they aren't keeping royalty statements, then how are they handling their taxes?

shadowwalker
02-17-2013, 07:15 PM
Call them out on it. Ask them to point you to the specific clause that allows them to do this.

This. If they're going to change the contract, the contract itself has to allow them to do that - and without your approval (that in itself sounds suspicious and quite frankly, wrong).

suki
02-17-2013, 07:18 PM
And yes, Suki, I guess I should just trust them. LOL. I do, but business is business and if money is exchanged, there needs to be an accounting for it. Here's hoping they decide on giving out numbers...

LOL - I was being sarcastic. It is ludicrous to expect you to just trust them without any royalty statement. Mistakes get made, even by well-meaning people/companies, and that's why there are safeguards in contracts. ;)

~suki

KimJo
02-17-2013, 08:16 PM
Every single one of my publishers sends me a royalty statement each time they do royalties. (Some are monthly, some are quarterly.)

For those of you who like to know these things, I am with:
MLR Press/Passion in Print/Featherweight (3 imprints, one company; MLR and Passion in Print are romance, and Featherweight is YA. Quarterly statements. Sometimes I get separate statements for each imprint, sometimes it's all in one document.)

Pink Petal Books/Jupiter Gardens Press (2 imprints, one company; Pink Petal is romance and JGP is YA. Monthly both-in-one statements)

Siren Publishing (romance; quarterly statements)

Noble Romance (romance; monthly statements, even since they started shitting on their authors)

Ellora's Cave (romance; monthly statements)

Dreamspinner Press (romance; quarterly statements)

Oxton House Publishing (an educational publisher where I have a reading/phonics/comprehension series; quarterly statements)

Jamesaritchie
02-17-2013, 08:40 PM
Every publisher I write for sends out royalty statements, but I don't write for e-publishers, so I'm in the dark there. But the publishers I do write also sell the books as e-books at some point, and still send out royalty statements.

I've never received monthly royalty statements, however, and this does seem like too much work. Most of mine come quarterly.

This really makes no sense. Surely the publisher knows how many copies of your book has sold. They have to know. You don't need to know where copy sells, only that it did sell, and the publisher has to know this, or they couldn't pay you at all.

Seriously, has this pubisher ever had anything to do with the publishing business? A publisher must know when one of its books sells, and sending you the count on a royalty statement is not a big deal.

VanessaNorth
02-17-2013, 08:43 PM
Yes, I get royalty statements. My royalty statements from Liquid Silver Books give me number of copies sold per book (with vendor breakdown available by request).

My statements from Musa break it down by vendor, copies sold, copies returned, even which country my Amazon sales go to. They are very detailed and available for me to download for myself any time I feel like it.

Siri Kirpal
02-17-2013, 08:55 PM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

One of my publishers doesn't SEND a royalty statement. But I can go online and see exactly what's going on and see the results they post monthly.

The other publisher sends a statement with the check.

You should have access to the information one way or another.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Beachgirl
02-17-2013, 09:02 PM
I'm with Siren Publishing and they send out detailed quarterly statements, complete with breakdowns from sales at third party sites. They also provide an online database where authors can get up-to-the-minute sales information for sales on the publisher's online bookstore. Our past royalty statements are also stored online, so we can retrieve them at any time.

I would not sign with a publisher who refused to provide royalty statements. And if they decided they no longer had to abide by the contract, I would likely decide not to abide by it, either.

amergina
02-17-2013, 11:39 PM
My publisher sends me a monthly statement that breaks out sales by 3rd party sellers.

If they can't manage a monthly or quarterly statement because the spreadsheet is just too hard, how the heck are they going to be able to accurately pay you? They have to have those numbers to be able to calculate your royalties.

And, frankly, they're legally obligated to abide by the language of their contract.

Al Stevens
02-17-2013, 11:55 PM
Wiley sends quarterly statements with a detailed sheet for each title.

Ask your publisher how they will respond when you bring your auditor in. Your contract should allow you to do that.

Jamesaritchie
02-18-2013, 12:11 AM
If they can't manage a monthly or quarterly statement because the spreadsheet is just too hard, how the heck are they going to be able to accurately pay you? They have to have those numbers to be able to calculate your royalties.



That's a really good question, isn't it? I guess you're supposed to trust that they'll find a way, or that they can guess really, really well.

frimble3
02-18-2013, 12:36 AM
If they can just change the terms of the contract, without your approval, what's to stop them from changing the royalty they're paying? Or the length of the contract.
"We've unilaterally decided that you, and all your future works, are with us for life."

thethinker42
02-18-2013, 12:40 AM
If they can just change the terms of the contract, without your approval, what's to stop them from changing the royalty they're paying? Or the length of the contract.
"We've unilaterally decided that you, and all your future works, are with us for life."

Exactly. The whole point of a contract is for everyone to know what the terms are. If someone can change it on a whim, then there's no point in having a contract, and I would definitely not want to do business with them.

G. Applejack
02-18-2013, 12:52 AM
Would you be so kind as to PM me the name of this publisher? This is all bad news and I don't want to make the mistake of subbing to them, or pull my manuscript if I have.

williemeikle
02-18-2013, 12:53 AM
...this publisher doesn't know of ANY publisher IN THE BUSINESS giving out individual statements to their authors.

Every publisher I've ever worked with has given out individual statements, and I wouldn't work with a publisher who didn't.

veinglory
02-18-2013, 01:30 AM
If they know what they owe you, they know what you sold. They need to get proper IT staff who can get it to print out on a statement.

victoriastrauss
02-18-2013, 01:36 AM
So I have to ask: Any other publishers come to mind that give royalty statements? This publisher wants to know...
A publisher should ALWAYS provide a royalty statement, and the publishing contract should specifically require it to do so and provide a schedule for doing so. Without a royalty statement, you have no way of keeping track of your sales and payments--or of holding the publisher to account if things go wrong.

I don't buy the "too much data" argument. There must be software for this sort of thing--or the publisher should hire a designer to set up a system for it. This just sounds incredibly unprofessional. What it tells me is that this publisher's bookkeeping is a mess--which means that it's not just statements; it may be that your payments aren't accurate. (If so, how handy to get rid of royalty statements.)

If the contract requires the publisher to provide statements and it ceases to do so, it's in breach of its obligations.

Who is the publisher? Contact me at beware [at] sfwa.org. All information shared with Writer Beware is held in confidence.

- Victoria

K. Victoria Chase
02-18-2013, 01:59 AM
LOL - I was being sarcastic.
HEHE, I got it. Me too.


Ask your publisher how they will respond when you bring your auditor in. Your contract should allow you to do that.
The contract does call for it and no clue how they will handle it. :-)


If they aren't keeping royalty statements, then how are they handling their taxes?
They keep track of numbers, they're just not handing them out.

Update: For those of us that made a lil' stink of it on facebook, we were told if we really want them, we could email the marketing director who will send us the statements. Sadly, I think many authors won't because you know how people like to excuse things...

I understand they're going through a growth spurt, but I maintain that anticipating the need for a bookkeeper separate from yourself (like an Editor in Chief doing most the work) is a must if you know you're growing (and I've suggested they hire one or a team). At some point, you have to hire more people to meet obligations or you have to severely limit your business growth model. I'll be watching closely to see how quickly they make a decision on whether they move to quarterly statements or not.

I do want to emphasize that the publisher isn't at all being nasty about it nor do they appear to have any other motive other than it's an enormous amount of work and they've got so many other things going on because of growth. No excuse, I know. Thank you for all the responses and I'll keep you posted!

thethinker42
02-18-2013, 02:09 AM
Update: For those of us that made a lil' stink of it on facebook, we were told if we really want them, we could email the marketing director who will send us the statements. Sadly, I think many authors won't because you know how people like to excuse things...

I understand they're going through a growth spurt, but I maintain that anticipating the need for a bookkeeper separate from yourself (like an Editor in Chief doing most the work) is a must if you know you're growing (and I've suggested they hire one or a team). At some point, you have to hire more people to meet obligations or you have to severely limit your business growth model. I'll be watching closely to see how quickly they make a decision on whether they move to quarterly statements or not.

I do want to emphasize that the publisher isn't at all being nasty about it nor do they appear to have any other motive other than it's an enormous amount of work and they've got so many other things going on because of growth. No excuse, I know. Thank you for all the responses and I'll keep you posted!

That would still be a tremendous red flag for me. Statements are not superfluous little extras that we should have to opt-in to receive. They should be treated like a pay stub at a regular 9-5 job, not something that's "inconvenient, but we'll send it if you ask for it."

Jersey Chick
02-18-2013, 02:14 AM
I wonder if we shouldn't merge the posts on the Entangled thread with this one.

I'm not a lawyer, but can a publisher just change a section of their contract and enforce it without any sort of addendum being signed by both parties? In my old life, when I worked in the purchasing dept of a huge research facility, one of my jobs was handling construction contracts and every single little change required an addendum that was signed by us and whichever contractor/vendor we were dealing with. Like someone mentioned, what's to stop them from changing all sorts of clauses then?

It wouldn't sit well with me, not receiving these statements. You shouldn't have to chase them down. The onus is on the publisher to provide them in the time frame you agreed to in the contract.

K. Victoria Chase
02-18-2013, 02:15 AM
Caveat: Contract calls for monthly statements but not more than 90 days after end of calendar month.

So we'll see if they honor the "quarterly" loophole they have here.

K. Victoria Chase
02-18-2013, 02:17 AM
I wonder if we shouldn't merge the posts on the Entangled thread with this one.

It's not Entangled. That is my error for causing the confusion. I posted the question to those authors because that's a young, well-known, large operation that I wanted to show as proof that they are doing it as well.

K. Victoria Chase
02-18-2013, 02:19 AM
It's not Entangled. That is my error for causing the confusion. I posted the question to those authors because that's a young, well-known, large operation that I wanted to show as proof that they are doing it as well.

That they ARE providing statements is what I mean...

amergina
02-18-2013, 02:25 AM
I wonder if we shouldn't merge the posts on the Entangled thread with this one.

Probably should be the other way around.... those threads about this on the Entangled thread should be stripped off and merged with this one, since it's not an Entangled issue, but a side conversation that broke out on the Entangled thread.

Jersey Chick
02-18-2013, 02:26 AM
Ugh. It came out backward. I meant take the posts in the Entangled thread and move them here. :D

amergina
02-18-2013, 02:28 AM
H

I do want to emphasize that the publisher isn't at all being nasty about it nor do they appear to have any other motive other than it's an enormous amount of work and they've got so many other things going on because of growth. No excuse, I know. Thank you for all the responses and I'll keep you posted!

These are the kinds of growing-pains that can sink a publisher. If the money gets screwed up... it's hard to set it right.

K. Victoria Chase
02-18-2013, 02:36 AM
These are the kinds of growing-pains that can sink a publisher. If the money gets screwed up... it's hard to set it right.

You're absolutely right and I'm hoping that doesn't happen to this one because they are producing some great books (in my biased opinion ;-) ) and they appear to have a few things going for them in the foreign/audio/tv rights areas.

Filigree
02-18-2013, 02:58 AM
Please PM me the name of this publisher, because I want to watch their progress. I find their accounting 'growing pains' really troubling.

Loose Id sends me rather complex royalty statements every month - of course, they've had a few years to get things right.

Sheryl Nantus
02-18-2013, 03:55 AM
Run for the hills.

I don't care how "successful" they may appear, this situation is just asking for someone to make off with the money.

If it's in the contract, it's in the contract. It can't be changed by one side just because it's too much trouble for them to send out statements.

No. No. No.

A pox on their heads for even considering this.

Jersey Chick
02-18-2013, 04:14 AM
Just out of curiosity, how long have you been with this publisher and have you gotten any statements at all?

BenPanced
02-18-2013, 04:51 AM
My first publisher sank without a trace just barely a year after I signed. I only got one statement during that time, and that was only after an independent auditor was brought in to iron things out. This was just one of a myriad contract violations.

Old Hack
02-18-2013, 11:35 AM
A publisher should ALWAYS provide a royalty statement, and the publishing contract should specifically require it to do so and provide a schedule for doing so. Without a royalty statement, you have no way of keeping track of your sales and payments--or of holding the publisher to account if things go wrong.

Agreed.


I don't buy the "too much data" argument. There must be software for this sort of thing--or the publisher should hire a designer to set up a system for it.

There is dedicated software available, but most accounting software can do the job. Excel would probably be fine with someone who knew their way around it.


This just sounds incredibly unprofessional. What it tells me is that this publisher's bookkeeping is a mess--which means that it's not just statements; it may be that your payments aren't accurate. (If so, how handy to get rid of royalty statements.)

That's my concern too.


I'm not a lawyer, but can a publisher just change a section of their contract and enforce it without any sort of addendum being signed by both parties?

I've known several publishers try to change their contracts retrospectively but it usually involves a lot of negotiation and legal time.

I'm no lawyer: but I think it might not be acceptable (or perhaps not even legally enforceable) for a contract to contain a clause which says one of the people who signed that contract can vary its other clauses at will.


Run for the hills.

I don't care how "successful" they may appear, this situation is just asking for someone to make off with the money.

If it's in the contract, it's in the contract. It can't be changed by one side just because it's too much trouble for them to send out statements.

No. No. No.

A pox on their heads for even considering this.

Sheryl's got the gist of it.

areteus
02-18-2013, 01:22 PM
Oh god, this is awful... my first impression of this is that the publisher has something to hide which is therefore not a good impression. And I echo previous comments about tax. Not just their taxes, what about yours? How are you going to prove to the IRS or whatever agency you deal with that you earned that money through legitimate means (i.e. selling books and not, for example, international drug smuggling, prostitution or working as a politician). They are potentially in breach of financial regulations too which is worth checking, especially as this document is effectively your 'payslip' which will give details of tax and other deductions on it. Governments get twitchy about companies not following the rules when it comes to financial matters.

I know of some publishers who have the royalty statement system set to automatically give a statement when an author requests it. No idea if this is done automatically (i.e. click a button and statement appears) or if someone has to prepare this in advance (i.e. using manhours to produce) but this may be an option for them to explore. Frankly, I am surprised this is not more automated anyway these days... I could set up an excel spreadsheet with automated formulas in it to calculate percent royalties and other factors really easily if given the required information like how many percent the royalty is and how much the book sells for in each edition. It would take me less than an hour and then I would copy and paste it for each book my company produced. Insert number of sales for that month, save and print (or email). It is not much more of a complication to set the print output to something pretty and save as a pdf for sending.... I suspect they simply do not want to expend the manhours needed to process them all each month. In which case, they should move to quarterly which is perfectly acceptable in the industry.

LindaJeanne
02-18-2013, 02:26 PM
I do want to emphasize that the publisher isn't at all being nasty about it nor do they appear to have any other motive other than it's an enormous amount of work and they've got so many other things going on because of growth.
Then this is a red flag that they are in way, way over their heads, to the point that their good intentions aren't going to help you much.

Inability to produce royalty statements or keep proper track of their accounting is not "growing pains".

(And if they were keeping proper track of their accounting, producing royalty statements would not be a huge hassle or a pain in the neck.)

Edited to Add: And their claim that this is "industry standard"? If it's not a blatant lie, then it's a sign that they have absolutely no clue how the industry works or what they are doing. There comes a point where ignorance is just as damaging as dishonesty.

Becky Black
02-18-2013, 03:19 PM
It's not only the checking up that they are paying you the right money that's the issue either. Information about what you are selling at each reseller is useful and can help you plan and target your promo and assess how well a previous promotional effort worked.

My publisher Loose Id gives me a statement that's broken down by reseller and edition of each book, with detailed breakdown of copies sold, money made, royalties to me etc. I stick them in a spreadsheet and make graphs and stuff (but I am a total Excel perv.)

Without that kind of breakdown I would never have realised how important All Romance Ebooks and Fictionwise (as was) were for my sales. It shook me out of my Amazon-centric mindset.

Al Stevens
02-18-2013, 06:50 PM
I would send the publisher a link to this thread. Even if they don't mend their ways, they need to see how folks in the industry view their practices. If they persist, I would out them in the Bewares forum.

The main thing to learn from this episode is that your publisher is not likely to be in business very long. You might find yourself in one of those situations where the rights to your work are in Limbo.

Good luck, and please let us know how it settles out.

victoriastrauss
02-18-2013, 08:14 PM
Update: For those of us that made a lil' stink of it on facebook, we were told if we really want them, we could email the marketing director who will send us the statements.
I know one other "publisher" that has an arrangement like this--you have to email them if you want a royalty statement--and it's a scam.

I do want to emphasize that the publisher isn't at all being nasty about it nor do they appear to have any other motive other than it's an enormous amount of work and they've got so many other things going on because of growth.If they're growing so fast that they don't have the manpower to fulfill their contractual obligations--or if they're so focused on expanding that they're allocating secondary importance to basic housekeeping--then this is not a good sign. It suggests they're forging forward without making certain they have a solid foundation for growth.

- Victoria

K. Victoria Chase
02-19-2013, 02:44 AM
Just out of curiosity, how long have you been with this publisher and have you gotten any statements at all?

Signed my first of two contracts last May. First book published in August and the first statement came three months after, as planned. I received the second statement in Dec and in Jan the decision was made not to give out individual statements. I had to email the editor for my numbers. I've decided to self-publish for now on so I won't be signing contracts anytime soon.


Edited to Add: And their claim that this is "industry standard"?

I know, I couldn't believe it either.


It's not only the checking up that they are paying you the right money that's the issue either. Information about what you are selling at each reseller is useful and can help you plan and target your promo and assess how well a previous promotional effort worked.

We authors who want statements have made this argument. And the publisher surely doesn't have the time to tell us where we should focus our marketing efforts if they can't even give us a statement.


If they're growing so fast that they don't have the manpower to fulfill their contractual obligations--or if they're so focused on expanding that they're allocating secondary importance to basic housekeeping--then this is not a good sign. It suggests they're forging forward without making certain they have a solid foundation for growth.

Agreed.


Good luck, and please let us know how it settles out.

I will! :-)

Jersey Chick
02-19-2013, 05:17 AM
Good luck. I got caught up (but fortunately came out unscathed) in the Aspen Mountain implosion. It's no fun having to chase people down to get things that are rightfully yours.

Good luck!

Mr Flibble
02-19-2013, 05:33 AM
If they have the correct info to pay you right, then they have the info to print it out as a statement. Any accounting software will allow you to do that. Even if they are using Excel, they have that info and it's a matter of seconds to email it/print it, even if the statement looks rough and ready.

It would be a MAHOOSIVE red flag to me if they couldn't be arsed to do that.

bearilou
02-19-2013, 06:36 AM
If they have the correct info to pay you right, then they have the info to print it out as a statement. Any accounting software will allow you to do that. Even if they are using Excel, they have that info and it's a matter of seconds to email it/print it, even if the statement looks rough and ready.

It would be a MAHOOSIVE red flag to me if they couldn't be arsed to do that.

This was my concern, too.

If they can cut you a check, that means they have the information available already. If they're not wanting to send it to you?

Won't lie, the thought makes me queasy if in the event something comes up and I have to prove something in a payment discrepancy.

Filigree
02-19-2013, 07:14 AM
Newer, smaller publishers tend to put the burden of marketing on their authors. Without royalty numbers, how are you to determine which markets respond to which promo efforts? Plus, the potential for abuse is simply too great.

jennontheisland
02-19-2013, 08:02 PM
Reason being is the spreadsheet has just too much data with hundreds of line items because of so many third parties sellers

The bolded part may be the issue.

They're really tracking everything, item by item, in excel?? They need better software. Excel is not a database; they need to stop using it as one.

Sheryl Nantus
02-19-2013, 08:10 PM
Don't know what their problem is, don't care.

Your job is to write. Their job is to deliver royalty statements as per the contract.

It's not your problem that they don't want to/can't do basic accounting. Not. Your. Problem.

It *will* be your problem when they underpay you and you don't even know it's being done.

Again, a pox on their heads. There's no reason why they can't send out statements other than possibly trying to hide problems. I refer you to the Silver Publishing thread for details on how *that* mess is going.

veinglory
02-19-2013, 08:13 PM
By my best recollection there is at least one epublisher out there that does not send a complete statement. One that has been around for years. So I would stop short of saying it means they are necessarily spirally around the drain because of this.

Jamesaritchie
02-19-2013, 08:54 PM
By my best recollection there is at least one epublisher out there that does not send a complete statement. One that has been around for years. So I would stop short of saying it means they are necessarily spirally around the drain because of this.

Unfortunately, it can mean they'll stay in business, but I can't see any way it doesn't mean writers are getting screwed.

James D. Macdonald
02-22-2013, 03:48 AM
So I have to ask: Any other publishers come to mind that give royalty statements? This publisher wants to know...

Every flippin' one that I've ever dealt with.

And if a publisher decided that they weren't going to follow their own contract, the next they heard from me would be on a lawyer's letterhead stationery.

So tell them to pull their heads out of their asses and start acting like real publishers, 'kay?

Paul
02-22-2013, 04:10 AM
PFFR

(posting for future reference)

Beachgirl
02-22-2013, 04:30 AM
Every flippin' one that I've ever dealt with.

And if a publisher decided that they weren't going to follow their own contract, the next they heard from me would be on a lawyer's letterhead stationery.

So tell them to pull their heads out of their asses and start acting like real publishers, 'kay?

I might just have to embroider this post on a pillow or something.

A.P.M.
02-22-2013, 05:00 AM
I'm with Extasy Books, and I get my statements quarterly. They're important, too, not only for tax purposes and to make sure payments are right, but to see which of my books are selling and where.

Ink-Smith
02-28-2013, 09:46 AM
As a publishing company i have to track what each author sales. we have a sheet for ourselves to track the exact number and we just send it on to the author. It may not be the easiest to read but it does have all the details they could want.

If they cant make a statement for you how are they tracking the accounts on there end? this is troubling to say the least.

simple contract law. They cant break the contract ever. no matter what. ever.

No matter what a contracts says a clause that allows them to change it at a whim is superseded by most state's have laws stating that under no circumstance can they change any part of a contract with out the approval of everyone who signed it.

Another thing worth noting is that your paycheck can in some situations count as your royalty statement, but that doesn't change the fact you should get it monthly.

I am sure you can just bring it up to him and he will follow through with the contract cause following the contract is every publishing companies policy.

Manuel Royal
03-04-2013, 06:42 PM
Reason being is the spreadsheet has just too much data with hundreds of line items because of so many third parties sellersWhat the deuce? I've worked with spreadsheets that had tens of thousands of lines. I haven't reached the publisher stage of my skyrocketing career yet, but don't have to, to know this is a ridiculous excuse.

CleoV
03-07-2013, 12:31 AM
Not only do I get statements, two of my contracts allow me to have an independant auditor come in once a year and audit the publisher if I think they're not being honest.

Never had to use that clause; certain I never will. When a publisher is up front about what's going on and willing to prove it, problems are not likely to occur. I'd run miles from any publisher who didn't provide statements. It's the most basic of services.