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acockey
02-05-2013, 04:39 PM
NPR Article yesterday:

http://www.npr.org/2013/02/04/171103053/self-publishing-now-the-first-choice-for-some-writers

Where a guru of self-publish is saying the ship is sinking, meaning the big four, and we should all self-publish, because those money grubbers at the Big Four take most of your profits.

Also, he went into how everyone, at every point in their life has a right to publish. Now to some extent, I believe this, but if everyone publishes then aren't we just gonna stop reading so much because of all the terrible writing.
I have been through this, where I just wont read one night, because I am disgusted by all the terrible grammar and formatting of some "free" books, that were self-published on my kindle, so I just gave up for the night.

Let me know if I should move this to a different Venue

Stacia Kane
02-05-2013, 05:02 PM
Mark Coker has a serious financial interest in writers self-publishing. Of course he wants more of us to do so.

shadowwalker
02-05-2013, 05:19 PM
:e2yawn:

NeuroFizz
02-05-2013, 06:18 PM
Self-publishing is a good venue for certain niches in writing that are unattractive to traditional publishers, and gives all writers a chance to "try the waters" of writing/publishing.

It also feeds the generations of humans who have been raised in the "everyone gets a medal" mentality of shunning competition and gaining immediate gratification. Unfortunately, it frequently short-circuits the chasing of excellence through mastery of the craft of writing and of peer review of that mastery.

veinglory
02-05-2013, 06:19 PM
Self-publishing has opened up great opportunities. But it is not a cult that has the 'answer' for every writer.

thothguard51
02-05-2013, 06:22 PM
The way things are going with SP, the revolution is soon to come, where the readers abandon self publishing.

I have grown to believe that all SP is...self published writers supporting other self published writers and readers be damned...

acockey
02-05-2013, 06:32 PM
My original intent I think of posting this was to one: say the interviewee is wrong headed, and two: to say that cant we all just coexist, why is always all or nothing with most of these self pubbing die hards

People need to chill on that point. I mean itunes and record companies coexist, so why not SP and TP

Bufty
02-05-2013, 06:38 PM
Gotcha.

Good job all us non-self-pubbers get our grammar and punctuation correct, eh? :poke:


My original intent I think of posting this was to one: say the interviewee is wrong headed, and two: to say that cant we all just coexist, why is always all or nothing with most of these self pubbing die hards

People need to chill on that point. I mean itunes and record companies coexist, so why not SP and TP

shadowwalker
02-05-2013, 06:41 PM
I think, just from what I'm seeing on a variety of forums, that the tide is turning from 'all or nothing' thinking to 'warts and all' thinking. Trade publishing fanatics and self-publishing gurus are becoming the minority; writers willing to concede that both avenues have pitfalls and problems along with benefits are becoming more outspoken, and this is good for everyone.

acockey
02-05-2013, 06:43 PM
@Bufty Think about the editor your not technically paying for...And then the self pubber who may think he is the God of Editing

@Shadow walker is there an article that shows that..if not.. how many forums...how many people?

JSSchley
02-05-2013, 06:45 PM
Mark Coker has a serious financial interest in writers self-publishing. Of course he wants more of us to do so.

I wrote a long reply, but you know, never mind.

That's it, right there.

Filigree
02-05-2013, 06:49 PM
SP is just another tool for authors. It has advantages and disadvantages. I will admit, I'm extra picky when I look at the first chapter or so of a self-published book. The chances of it being written, edited, and formatted to commercial standards are often not good.

But one of my favorite fantasy (http://www.amazon.com/By-Blade-and-Cloth-ebook/dp/B00495XSZG/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_8) books, which I'd always hoped would get picked up by a commercial publisher, was self-published by a friend. And I'm seeing a large number of AW folks who have self-published well.

folkchick
02-05-2013, 06:57 PM
acockey has an excellent point in comparing the publishing world to the music world. For years now, it has become acceptable for a musician or band to record and release work on an independent label. Great music, too. In fact, a lot of indie music—IMO—is better than mainstream because it remains honest and simple.

But here's where we have a problem in comparisons. Whereas in music you can be sloppy and different as long as the songwriting is solid, in the publishing world sloppy and different won't hold up. Why? Because writing has a template of expectations: solid opening, good pacing, strong voice, likable characters, good grammar, good plot. All of these are possible with a good mentor, i.e. beta readers, editor. But how many sp'd people are getting proper mentorship? How many are spending two years laboring over a manuscript with proper feedback? An album can be cut and released the same day online. A book should never esteem to quick standards. Anyone who praises themselves for writing a book in a week and then publishing it the next, is truly doing themselves a disservice. So I would say, yes SPing is a good answer if you're willing to put in the same amount of effort as a traditionally published book. But it should never be done quickly.

My opinion only.

acockey
02-05-2013, 06:59 PM
@Filigree I am not saying that self pubbing is bad in anyway...More to the point I am asking self pubbers to stop acting like that guy on the street with the "Apocalypse Now" sign around his neck

@folkchic a valid point. Counter Point, autotuning, and All of Paris Hilton's Music

CrastersBabies
02-05-2013, 07:06 PM
I would love to support more self-published writers, but like the OP said, the errors screw that up. Almost every time. I've honestly given up on it.

Roger J Carlson
02-05-2013, 07:18 PM
The comparison between music and literature also breaks down in terms of the audience's investment of time. You can download a song and it takes 3-4 minutes. When you download a self-published novel, you've got an investment of hours at least.

MumblingSage
02-05-2013, 07:34 PM
SP is just another tool for authors. It has advantages and disadvantages. I will admit, I'm extra picky when I look at the first chapter or so of a self-published book. The chances of it being written, edited, and formatted to commercial standards are often not good.

But one of my favorite fantasy (http://www.amazon.com/By-Blade-and-Cloth-ebook/dp/B00495XSZG/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_8) books, which I'd always hoped would get picked up by a commercial publisher, was self-published by a friend. And I'm seeing a large number of AW folks who have self-published well.

One of my favorite fantasy books (http://www.amazon.com/The-God-Eaters-Jesse-Hajicek/dp/1847288650)was also self-published! Which is funny upon reflection, because self-published and small press fantasy books are some of the ones I look most critically at--as my genre of choice, I have high standards for it and too often I read something that's like a first draft I could encounter in a critique group. I think it was our very own Uncle Jim who said "In a good economy, any fantasy book from moderately good on up will find a publisher. Even in a bad economy, any good fantasy book will find a publisher." Which is not encouraging for the self-published ones you see. But since then a lot of people, AWs included, are releasing very quality self published works, especially with Kindle.

I'm not really sure why The God Eaters didn't go with one when it was published some years ago, although judging by the reviews it's making steady sales on its own.

Susan Littlefield
02-05-2013, 07:41 PM
Self Publishing is just another tool for writers. It's not all or nothing, and SPs not going to out the major publishing houses.

Sadly, many writers just see SP as a way to get their work out there and self-publish without taking proper care with self-editing and professional editing services. When you publish your own work, you have to provide those services for yourself that would be provided with a traditional publisher.

On the other hand, my friend self-published a book of short stories (he doesn't write novels), made sure his book was in pristine condition prior to publication, and he got picked up by a small publishing house. It's not one of the big five, but the publishing house has a good reputation and my friend is very happy with two short story collections out.

This is one writer friend I will support through anything he writes.

acockey
02-05-2013, 07:42 PM
@Mumbling Sage For some reason I can't justify paying for digital copies of anything of 9.99..just my opinion.. I like the painting esque cover of the book..price is an automatic shut down for me

Susan Littlefield
02-05-2013, 07:45 PM
@Filigree I am not saying that self pubbing is bad in anyway...More to the point I am asking self pubbers to stop acting like that guy on the street with the "Apocalypse Now" sign around his neck

Yes, well that's a sweeping generalization. The self published authors I know don't act like that at all.


@folkchic a valid point. Counter Point, autotuning, and All of Paris Hilton's Music

Music is music. Everybody has their taste.

acockey
02-05-2013, 07:53 PM
@Susan Littlefield I can point you to one or more interviews were this holds true

http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidvinjamuri/2012/08/15/publishing-is-broken-were-drowning-in-indie-books-and-thats-a-good-thing/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bernard-starr/the-new-vanity-publishing_b_1821945.html

http://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/05/29/10-reasons-you-should-skip-the-traditional-publishers-and-self-publish-ebooks-instead/

these articles are more or less in the same vain as the first..Self pubbing equals "jet pack future"

Polenth
02-05-2013, 07:55 PM
Anytime I see someone claiming there is only one true way to publish, regardless of what way, I assume it's a marketing ploy. It's to get people linking to them and talking about them. The balanced view is that what route is best depends on the project and writer, but that doesn't go viral or sell books for the person saying it.

So for the most part, it's better to ignore "one true way" people, other than to warn others not to fall for the marketing ploy.

Phaeal
02-05-2013, 07:57 PM
If self-publishing is so wonderful, why did James sell Fifty Shades to Random House? Also, Fifty wasn't technically self-published (as I understand it) but distributed by the e-and-POD publisher, The Writer's Coffeeshop. AFTER a shrewd platform-building campaign in the world of fan fiction.

Also, why did Amanda Hocking give up her self-pubbing empire? According to her, IIRC, it was to escape the grind of doing it all herself and to avail herself of the expertise of St. Martin's Press. But has her first (original) St. Martin's book, Wake, matched her earlier (much lower priced) successes? I didn't even realize it had been published yet, and I check the lists pretty regularly. Anyone been following her post-self-pubbing career?

Where Coker is disingenuous, in my opinion, is in ignoring how hard the self-publisher must work to perfect his work, learn to market like a pro, build a core platform. His remark that, well, at least self-pubbers might reach a audience of one is simply ludricous. Come on, does anyone self-publish with no more than that single reader in mind? Or do too many self-publish with stars in their eyes, only to wonder a few months later when the readers and revenue are going to start pouring in? Interviews like the one under discussion, which ignore the realities of any publishing venture, just feed into the frenzy of entitlement and plummeting standards and disappointment for writer and reader alike.

shadowwalker
02-05-2013, 07:58 PM
@Shadow walker is there an article that shows that..if not.. how many forums...how many people?

As I said, this is what I'm seeing on a variety of forums and from a variety of writers. I've not made a scientific survey.

Stacia Kane
02-05-2013, 08:14 PM
acockey has an excellent point in comparing the publishing world to the music world. For years now, it has become acceptable for a musician or band to record and release work on an independent label. Great music, too. In fact, a lot of indie musicóIMOóis better than mainstream because it remains honest and simple.

But here's where we have a problem in comparisons. Whereas in music you can be sloppy and different as long as the songwriting is solid, in the publishing world sloppy and different won't hold up. Why? Because writing has a template of expectations: solid opening, good pacing, strong voice, likable characters, good grammar, good plot. All of these are possible with a good mentor, i.e. beta readers, editor. But how many sp'd people are getting proper mentorship? How many are spending two years laboring over a manuscript with proper feedback? An album can be cut and released the same day online. A book should never esteem to quick standards. Anyone who praises themselves for writing a book in a week and then publishing it the next, is truly doing themselves a disservice. So I would say, yes SPing is a good answer if you're willing to put in the same amount of effort as a traditionally published book. But it should never be done quickly.

My opinion only.


A lot of work goes into releasing a song or album on an indie label, at least it did with the bands I know. It's not just "Sit around a microphone in your living room and play the song, then release the file." You still--or again, the bands I knew did--hire an engineer at a recording studio, which isn't cheap. You record and mix the song; even if you're recording "live" (as in, everyone playing the song together) every instrument has a mic. Sometimes--often--vocals are recorded separately. Often there are several takes. Then it's mixed to make sure everything sounds good.

A track listing is chosen. Cover art is created. Records or CDs are printed--and that's not cheap, either. You have a list of stores you want to get your records into. You book a tour and have people to sell your records at your shows. Review copies are sent out to whatever magazines or whatever who review your type of music. You have people who collect money and mail out the product.

I'm sure a lot of the distribution process is now digital, in that people can buy the music off iTunes, but that means you have to get everything loaded onto iTunes, and I'm sure there are still a lot of labels and bands that produce physical copies.

I've watched quite a few records being recorded; I sang backup vocals on one. It's a complex, hours-long process.


I'm sure there are bands who skimp on all of that, and release an album the day it's recorded, but recording and releasing an album isn't generally just a matter of just playing a song and then instantly putting out a digital file--not if you want it to sound good, any more than self-pubbing a book means writing the last word of the ms and then instantly uploading it. And most indie labels are like publishers in that they have an audience already who is familiar with their sound and reputation, and will check out their new releases.

That might have changed to some extent, again, but I don't think it's that different from what it was when I was doing it.

folkchick
02-05-2013, 08:31 PM
Stacia—Good point. There is a lot of work that goes into an album, indie or label.

MumblingSage
02-05-2013, 08:34 PM
@Mumbling Sage For some reason I can't justify paying for digital copies of anything of 9.99..just my opinion.. I like the painting esque cover of the book..price is an automatic shut down for me

It's $24.00 for a print copy, actually. God Eaters has no digital edition; part of why I sort of wish it'd had a publisher...then it would be a lot cheaper! It was $20 when I bought it years ago--might have on sale, or else inflation is catching up. That's saddening, especially because the real self-publishing success stories you hear are people selling $2.99 or 99 cent Kindle books.

KateJJ
02-05-2013, 08:49 PM
As a writer, my goal is to work with a trade publisher because I want to tell stories. Not make covers or sell books or call up bookstores. I also want to tell darn good stories, so I want to work with a professional editor, someone who will help me hone my craft and make each book better than the last.

As a reader, I avoid self published books because I honestly don't know how to go about finding the good ones in amongst the rest. With a trade published book I can make certain assumptions; the text is going to be relatively error free, there will be a plot that has a beginning, middle, and end, and if it comes from a publisher I know and trust that tells me something about the story. How many hundreds of thousands of self published books are there? How am I supposed to find the ones with good, compelling stories that are also properly formatted and adhere to normal rules of spelling and grammar?

It's sad, but it's true, and until someone comes up with a way for me to find the books I'll enjoy reading, I just don't bother looking at self-published books.

Filigree
02-05-2013, 09:18 PM
I look at the digital versions of self-published works on Kindle, Nook, or Smashwords. I give the book several pages to hook me. If any errors jump out and derail my immersion, I don't bother with the rest. I do this with commercially-published books, too.

acockey
02-05-2013, 09:23 PM
@Filigree an example of a self published or commercial book that didn't grab you recently..for research purposes?

MumblingSage
02-05-2013, 09:30 PM
I keep forgetting to add to this conversation that, before I found books like The God Eaters, I passed many hours reading fanfiction, some of which was amazingly good. So it's not like publishers are necessary to produce quality works. They just help a lot--and also as gatekeepers. Even if authors didn't want or need publishers to do the heavy lifting, readers want them to help filter out books of the quality and genre they want.

Katie Elle
02-05-2013, 09:31 PM
If self-publishing is so wonderful, why did James sell Fifty Shades to Random House? Also, Fifty wasn't technically self-published (as I understand it) but distributed by the e-and-POD publisher, The Writer's Coffeeshop. AFTER a shrewd platform-building campaign in the world of fan fiction.

Grocery stores.

Nevermind bookstores, they're hard enough to get into. Grocery stores, drug stores, department stores. The places where people buy books who usually don't buy books. FSOG is in all of those.

Everyone stands on even ground with an ebook, but when you get into print, it's difficult, to say the least, to get a POD book into a bookshop and even if you do, the profit margins on POD are pretty mediocre. You can't touch mass market without the distribution chain and printing economies of scale of not just a trade publisher, but a very large one.

I'm with Shadowalker. The number of people grandstanding on "fighting the man" are mainly a few bloggers. Most of us make reasonable guesses about what makes the most sense to us. The latest of the melded models is people retaining ebook rights, but selling print rights with the feeling that this is where each model works the best. Mark, more or less, needs to spend less time evangelizing and more time working on his site. I have a lot of respect for what he's done, but his site is falling way behind and there are some new competitors.

Filigree
02-05-2013, 09:44 PM
Again, it comes down to distribution and sales. When I queried e-pubs last year, I picked only those with the highest total average sales. My book is not a wild bestseller, but the sheer size and good reputation of my publisher means I get a lot of browsing readers I wouldn't get with a smaller pub - or in the sea of self-publishing.

Finding out how well a publisher sells isn't always easy, but it's worth the time to research.

I'm certainly not going to self-publish anything until I have enough of a commercial presence to use as a marketing platform.

veinglory
02-05-2013, 10:16 PM
I would note that Fifty Shades was online, then with a small press. It wasn't self-published in ebook or print form.

Phaeal
02-05-2013, 10:36 PM
The latest of the melded models is people retaining ebook rights, but selling print rights with the feeling that this is where each model works the best.

I have trouble believing the big trade publishers are going to relinquish e-rights without a fight, given the increasing share of the book market e-books are consuming. It's more than a decade since J. K. Rowling started retaining her digital rights to the HP books, and Little, Brown kept digital rights to The Casual Vacancy.

Al Stevens
02-05-2013, 10:39 PM
An album can be cut and released the same day online.Usually, an indie recording follows months or even years of public performances and road dues. It doesn't happen overnight.

Al Stevens
02-05-2013, 10:48 PM
I'm sure there are still a lot of labels and bands that produce physical copies.When I was playing the festival circuit, most of our income was from sales of CDs from the bandstand. It's why we toured. The band I toured with is still doing it.

Susan Littlefield
02-06-2013, 12:29 AM
@Susan Littlefield I can point you to one or more interviews were this holds true

http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidvinjamuri/2012/08/15/publishing-is-broken-were-drowning-in-indie-books-and-thats-a-good-thing/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bernard-starr/the-new-vanity-publishing_b_1821945.html

http://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/05/29/10-reasons-you-should-skip-the-traditional-publishers-and-self-publish-ebooks-instead/

these articles are more or less in the same vain as the first..Self pubbing equals "jet pack future"

The articles are others opinions, not the opinions of self published writers themselves. You have made a sweeping generalization about the attitude of those who are self published.

Self publishing is not good or bad in of itself, it's just another tool for writers to utilize. Success is about how you use the tool, not that the tool exists.

Susan Littlefield
02-06-2013, 12:34 AM
Stacia is right on.

My significant other is a professional musician, and his band has recorded three albums under independent labels. There is a lot of work to putting together an album whether it be with a major or indie label. Many

folkchick
02-06-2013, 12:40 AM
Usually, an indie recording follows months or even years of public performances and road dues. It doesn't happen overnight.
__________________

Al Stevens, I have to agree, especially when it comes to full length albums. I was using a very stark example of something that could happen if all the key elements came together in the right way. A person could have their guitar, a nice microphone*, Garageband and about four or five songs, an EP pretty much. They play straight with no mistakes, do a quick mix with no bells or whistles, then they upload it to Soundcloud with a jpeg they took in their bathroom mirror. This could all happen in one day. Albeit, the marketing is nonexistent at that point, but they did produce a product for consumption, and maybe even a good product. If a person has written solid songs they can go bare minimum and still really have something great. In fact, I think many sound engineers spend WAY too much time mixing the hell out of an album, very often losing track of little idiosyncrasies that could have added to the final sound.

Talking about the music business depresses me so I was kicking myself for writing anything on here, but I do like the idea of Instant Karma as John Lennon once put it. It doesn't always work, but it can. I don't think it works as well in the publishing industry on a general basis. It just seems like a different monster; there's much less forgiveness when a book has mistakes than there is with an album.

* a cowbell would be awesome too

acockey
02-06-2013, 12:52 AM
@Susan go back and reread I even said in one of my posts that self pubbing wasn't inherently a bad option..

victoriastrauss
02-06-2013, 01:24 AM
The comparison between music and literature also breaks down in terms of the audience's investment of time. You can download a song and it takes 3-4 minutes. When you download a self-published novel, you've got an investment of hours at least.
It breaks down on numerous levels, IMO. Musicians have two products: recordings and performance, both of which generate income streams (and in the case of albums, multiple income streams, since songs can be sold individually), and each of which can be used to promote the other. Whereas writers have a single product--their writing--which can't be broken up and sold in pieces; and the promotional avenues available to them are mostly unpaid and outside the boundaries of craft.

Plus, you can buy a song and listen to it over and over, but how often do you re-read a book? Buying a song is an investment that pays out many times. Buying a book is an investment that pays out once. A much different reality for consumers.

I do think a broad comparison can be made between indie musicians and self-publishing writers and the challenges they pose to the establishment--but at the individual level that comparison breaks down, because the financial, promotional, and artistic realities are very different.

- Victoria

cooeedownunder
02-06-2013, 01:30 AM
Here is a link to a well known Australian agent's blog, and to put it in her words or for that matter, rant, why the self publishing bubble will burst

http://callmyagent.blogspot.com.au/2012/10/this-bubble-will-burst.html

Dorky
02-06-2013, 02:47 AM
Also, he went into how everyone, at every point in their life has a right to publish.

Sure, anyone can self publish if they want to.


Where a guru of self-publish is saying the ship is sinking, meaning the big four, and we should all self-publish, because those money grubbers at the Big Four take most of your profits.

Hahaha no. They arenít going anywhere IMO. Publishers can do a lot that is much more difficult for self-pubbers to do. Thereís the marketing, the book layout and cover design, the whole physical-book-in-a-store thing, etc etc.

Some people just donít want to do all of that.

The houses also act as a filter of sorts. The people that donít publish with a major house probably 1) got unlucky and submitted at a bad time (too many similar works or too few works like it and they donít know if there is an audience for this), 2) didnít have a good query, or 3) didnít have a great story. Itís #3 that doesnít get filtered out with self-published novels. The publishers have pretty decent editors on-board as well, whereas youíd have to pay for one yourself if you self-pubbed.

Basically, the publishers make sure the published work isnít an absolute pile of stinky socks. Thatís a good thing, IMO. I can buy a book from them and feel pretty confident about my choice. Itís not the same with self-published novels (unless itís someone I already know). I donít get that same level of, ďIím sure this will be decent,Ē that I do from traditionally published ones.

I do like to buy books that have been self-published, but itís considerably more difficult. I have to wade through a freaking sea of stories from people Iíve never heard of until I find one that makes me say, ďThis sounds interesting.Ē

Anyway, thatís how I feel as a reader. As an aspiring writer, however, I want to say, ďWoohoo! Self-publishing is awesome!Ē :D

Buffysquirrel
02-06-2013, 03:43 AM
It really irks me when the British press try to make out FSOG is some kind of secret vice. There was a huge display of the flipping books in ASDA (WalMart). That's about as secret as the sunset.

Laer Carroll
02-06-2013, 06:14 AM
Self-publishing has opened up great opportunities. But it is not a cult that has the 'answer' for every writer.


My original intent I think of posting this was to one: say the interviewee is wrong headed, and two: to say that cant we all just coexist, why is always all or nothing with most of these self pubbing die hards.

Any time I see someone using a black-and-white EITHER-OR argument I classify them as a fool. The real world is most often a rainbow world Ė or at least one with many shades of grey.

I self-publish. I will also pursue trade publishing sometime later this year.

Susan Littlefield
02-06-2013, 07:56 AM
@Susan go back and reread I even said in one of my posts that self pubbing wasn't inherently a bad option..

Whether self publishing is or is not a bad/good option is not what I am referring to. You said:


More to the point I am asking self pubbers to stop acting like that guy on the street with the "Apocalypse Now" sign around his neck

This statement is a generalization because you are putting "self Pubblers" into a certain group. I could be misunderstanding, so perhaps you can clarify the quoted statement. :)

acockey
02-06-2013, 08:15 AM
@Susan What I am trying to say is that these people who run around like "Chicken little" need to take a deep breath, and those who know better need to tell them to coexsist

MacAllister
02-06-2013, 08:27 AM
@Susan What I am trying to say is that these people who run around like "Chicken little" need to take a deep breath, and those who know better need to tell them to coexsist

Right. I think everyone here got that.

But you're coming across as a concern troll, and that's getting really old, really fast.

JournoWriter
02-07-2013, 04:01 PM
Plus, you can buy a song and listen to it over and over, but how often do you re-read a book? Buying a song is an investment that pays out many times. Buying a book is an investment that pays out once.

I just finished re-reading a favorite series that I discovered in high school, nearly 20 years ago. Speak for yourself! ;)

I often wish I could read like I listen to music, while driving or doing laundry. Unfortunately, audiobooks are really expensive, and slower to get through.

cornflake
02-07-2013, 04:14 PM
Plus, you can buy a song and listen to it over and over, but how often do you re-read a book? Buying a song is an investment that pays out many times. Buying a book is an investment that pays out once. A much different reality for consumers.I can't even count how many books I've rebought over the years because I read them to pieces. I'm on my like third entire set of my fave author's work.

I know people who don't reread, and who don't rewatch movies, but there are plenty of us who read books over and over (or even just a couple of times - I browse my own books, find something I bought years ago, have only the vaguest recollection of, and reread) and over, same as watching the same movie 50x. It's just a preference thing, but rest assured there are people who reread books plenty.

At least with music there've only really been format transitions to buy.