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Spell-it-out
01-29-2013, 04:56 PM
Hi all,

Could you tell me if you guys use "Wondering" in everyday speech, or is it an Irish-ism on my behalf?

e.g. "I was wondering about that car," Adam said, "it looks like a pile of crap."

Thank you.

Kerosene
01-29-2013, 04:59 PM
Yeah, its fine.

Spell-it-out
01-29-2013, 05:02 PM
Should have been more exact, New-England Americans.

Thanks for the quick reply Will!

alleycat
01-29-2013, 05:12 PM
A minor note in case you use it in your story, it would be New England or New Englander, not New-England.

And I don't think I've ever heard the term New England American used.

But, yeah, wondering is fine used in that way.

cornflake
01-29-2013, 05:13 PM
Sure, though I'm now wondering what you think people might've said instead. ;)

alleycat
01-29-2013, 05:16 PM
"I was curious about the car."

"I was worried about the car."

"I was thinking about the car."

cornflake
01-29-2013, 05:19 PM
"I was curious about the car."

"I was worried about the car."

"I was thinking about the car."

Well sure, those too, though I think the second is less synonymous.

*tossing a shiny ball*

alleycat
01-29-2013, 05:20 PM
Oh, a shiny ball!

PorterStarrByrd
01-29-2013, 05:24 PM
wondering would probably be the first choice, the others are a little more archaic, more correct, more specific, but less used.

cornflake
01-29-2013, 05:25 PM
Oh, a shiny ball!

I could tell from your pic it seemed like you'd enjoy that. :)

Spell-it-out
01-29-2013, 06:01 PM
And I don't think I've ever heard the term New England American used.



I won't be using that term, or any variation of it. Thank you for the heads up though.
Oh, New England based Americans from now on :)


"I was curious about the car."

"I was worried about the car."

"I was thinking about the car."



wondering would probably be the first choice, the others are a little more archaic, more correct, more specific, but less used.



I want to use "wondering", as "curious" and "worried" do not fit the image of the character I have in mind. But, good suggestions nonetheless.



But, yeah, wondering is fine used in that way.

Thank you.





Originally Posted by alleycat
Oh, a shiny ball!

I could tell from your pic it seemed like you'd enjoy that


Still laughing at this!

Thanks for the quick response, all of you.

alleycat
01-29-2013, 06:05 PM
I didn't really mean those as suggestions, just listing some other ways it could be said by an American.

alleycat
01-29-2013, 06:06 PM
I could tell from your pic it seemed like you'd enjoy that. :)

Got any yarn?

asroc
01-29-2013, 06:22 PM
Well, you already got your answer, but I'm from New England and I can confirm that wondering is fine.

Haggis
01-29-2013, 06:27 PM
Got any yarn?
*drags piece of thread through thread*

alleycat
01-29-2013, 06:32 PM
*drags piece of thread through thread*

I'm not falling for that again. The last time there was a boulder attached to the end of the thread.

Haggis
01-29-2013, 06:38 PM
I'm not falling for that again. The last time there was a boulder attached to the end of the thread.
:rolleyes:

leahzero
01-29-2013, 07:39 PM
It's just "Americans," by the way. Not "US Americans."

Spell-it-out
01-29-2013, 08:20 PM
It's just "Americans," by the way. Not "US Americans."

Just to be safe from the North Americans, Central and South Americans ;)

ColtonRicks
01-30-2013, 10:33 AM
Just to be safe from the North Americans, Central and South Americans ;)

As a United States of America 'American' I sometimes refer to other North or South Americans as 'American', but only in jest or trying to create team unity in darts/pool/bowling the such. But I have not heard any of them do it on their own accord. 100% (haven't met everybody though) of the people I've dealt with have all preferred to refer to themselves as Brazilian, Canadian, Guatemalan, etc. For some reason the stink attached to the word American has left a bad taste in some mouths, which coincidentally might be why many Americans - some encouraged by their embassy - have claimed to be Canadians while traveling abroad. But I do appreciate the distinction made with good intentions, even if it is not required by the 'other' Americans.

amschilling
01-30-2013, 05:00 PM
The one thing I did tweak on, coming from New England, was "pile of crap." We'd probably say it was a *piece* of crap. Or a piece of shit. Wondering is fine.

Spell-it-out
01-30-2013, 05:17 PM
The one thing I did tweak on, coming from New England, was "pile of crap." We'd probably say it was a *piece* of crap. Or a piece of shit. Wondering is fine.

Didn't even think of that Ams! "Pile of crap" may be used in my NE based story. Thank you for the suggestion.



But I do appreciate the distinction made with good intentions, even if it is not required by the 'other' Americans.


Thanks for this Colton.

jaksen
01-30-2013, 08:46 PM
In my little part of New England, crap was a word meaning junk or stuff. My mother often said to us, pick up your crap. We are now cleaning out my mother's home of sixty years and my sister often refers to 'our mother's crap.' (I don't, however, as I don't like thinking of my mother's belongings as junk.)

However, when I started teaching and would say to my students, perhaps in a lab situation: 'Please remove all this crap from the lab area...' many of them would say, 'That's a bad word, Mrs. M. You shouldn't say it.'

Some time during my lifetime, at least in New England, the word 'crap' became synonymous with shit. (I missed the day when we all agreed to this change.)

The way words are used or defined can change like that - 'snaps fingers' - or so it seems.

My little grandson has also told me that 'crap' is a bad word.

Luprec
02-02-2013, 03:08 AM
In my little part of New England, crap was a word meaning junk or stuff.

I don't think this is particular to New England. This is how I've always seen it used, and I've never lived outside of California.

Spell-it-out
02-02-2013, 03:35 AM
Thanks Luprec and Jaksen for your input.

Pj Little
03-05-2013, 01:51 AM
I live in the Midwest. I used "wondering" as a child. It was a prelude to my attempt to learn information I was not privy to.

"It's Saturday, I was wondering if you ere going to town. I want to go too." Or "Gorgeous house; I wonder what it looks like inside?" "That's a good looking vehicle. I wonder if runs as good as it looks?"

Now that I am 60-years older I am more direct. I wonder less and wander more...

Diana_Rajchel
03-05-2013, 07:29 AM
We still use wondering. Usually it's started as "just wondering... Does Annie have the car?" Or, "can you spring a pig off a trebuchet? Just wondering."

Chase
03-05-2013, 08:19 AM
It's just "Americans," by the way. Not "US Americans."

Absolutely untrue. I'm a U.S. American with lots of friends who are Canadian Americans, two correspondences who are Chilean Americans, and a relative who's married to a Central American.

If you're wondering, the Americas are two huge continents, on which the U.S. is one country.

Chasing the Horizon
03-05-2013, 08:35 AM
In my area "Canadian American" means someone who was born in Canada and has moved to the United States. The Canadians I've known who lived in Canada would give you a very odd look indeed if you called them "Canadian American".

blacbird
03-05-2013, 09:37 AM
Don't say "US Americans". Just say "Yank bastards". We'll understand.

caw

Chase
03-05-2013, 10:41 AM
I guess borders are long and diverse. The Canadians in my small circle know geography.

Been called a bastard before, though never a yank to my face, but then I don't exchange nationalistic labels much.

Chris P
03-05-2013, 10:56 AM
Southerners (such as our Mr Alleycat) seem to have a broader definition of "worried." In Mississippi, "worried" can mean "bothered," as in "Last summer, the flies were like to worry that poor dog to death." In other parts, "worried" is only used in the sense of "I thought something bad was going to happen."


Just to be safe from the North Americans, Central and South Americans ;)

Although we are "Americans," we say we come from "the United States" and not from "America." The rest of the world uses "America" to mean "the US," and some people here get confused when I tell them Canada, Brazil, and Peru, are not in the same America I come from.

Maxinquaye
03-05-2013, 12:32 PM
Been called a bastard before, though never a yank to my face, but then I don't exchange nationalistic labels much.

But yank does not mean yankee. :D It's a British word for any citizens of the US.

'Them yank cars are something, innit?'

'That yank wants ya'.

'Could it be that yank film you saw?'

'There's summat right wrong with them yank beers.'

Raison
03-05-2013, 12:36 PM
As a United States of America 'American' I sometimes refer to other North or South Americans as 'American', but only in jest or trying to create team unity in darts/pool/bowling the such. But I have not heard any of them do it on their own accord. 100% (haven't met everybody though) of the people I've dealt with have all preferred to refer to themselves as Brazilian, Canadian, Guatemalan, etc.
People of Central and South America do make distinctions. They refer to the people of the U.S. as "norteamericanos de Estados Unidos" (basically, North Americans of United States).

Spell-it-out
03-05-2013, 03:51 PM
Don't say "US Americans". Just say "Yank bastards". We'll understand.

caw

Damn I'm not that nuts :D

Thanks everyone for the replies. (and even for the off topic conversations :) )

Spell-it-out
03-05-2013, 03:55 PM
Although we are "Americans," we say we come from "the United States" and not from "America." The rest of the world uses "America" to mean "the US," and some people here get confused when I tell them Canada, Brazil, and Peru, are not in the same America I come from.

Chris, a quote from Miss South Carolina.....



Miss South Carolina Lauren Caitlin Upton
I personally believe, that U.S. Americans,
are unable to do so,
because uh,
some, people out there, in our nation dont have maps.
and uh


See, see! Ye guys do use "U.S. Americans" :D

Like, she has to be right.... ;)

Chris P
03-05-2013, 03:57 PM
Chris, a quote from Miss South Carolina.....

See, see! Ye guys do use "U.S. Americans" :D

Like, she has to be right.... ;)

As you sure she didn't mean "us Americans," and in "we Americans"? You never kno-ow!

Alessandra Kelley
03-05-2013, 04:10 PM
"U.S. Americans" is an awkward neologism used by people who have been made self-conscious of the privileged term almost all US citizens use all the time, "American." It is used when talking to foreigners or if one is trying to show one's sophistication and to a native's ears sounds awkward and peculiar.

"American" is what is almost universally used by US citizens. See "the American Revolution," "the American Way," "only in America" (meaning the US), "American made," "the American flag," and a myriad of others.

onesecondglance
03-05-2013, 04:18 PM
Southerners (such as our Mr Alleycat) seem to have a broader definition of "worried." In Mississippi, "worried" can mean "bothered," as in "Last summer, the flies were like to worry that poor dog to death." In other parts, "worried" is only used in the sense of "I thought something bad was going to happen."

This sense is used in the UK too, with varying degrees of intensity. A dog off its lead (that's what we call a leash) running around a flock of sheep, freaking them out would be "sheep-worrying". To bite something and sort of pull at it is also "worrying", which has transferred to mean any kind of slow damage.

I guess if you are a sheep, then all of the above would be pretty worrying.

Roger J Carlson
03-05-2013, 07:21 PM
Well, "American" is simply a shortcut for "someone who lives in the United States of America".

People from Canada are Canadian. People from Brazil are Brazillian. People who live in North America are North American. People who live in South America are South American. There is no continent called "America". There is no other country that has the word "America" in it.

What else should we be called? USians? USAers?

Chase
03-05-2013, 07:46 PM
As usual, everyone's sure his or her take on naming peoples and locales is the universal norm. I got a small lesson on the matter when ready to depart Germany and return stateside.

A nice little old lady noticed my bags and asked where I was off to. I said "America."

She became excited and asked me to say hello to her son if I saw him . . . in Argentina.

RemaCaracappa
03-05-2013, 11:58 PM
Should have been more exact, New-England Americans.

Thanks for the quick reply Will!


My roommate is from Massachusetts (you can call them Massholes!), she uses "wondering" in that context.

Also, with regards to "piece of" versus "pile of", she uses both, it's just a matter of what word happens to fall out of her mouth at the given moment. This is common of other New Englanders I've known.

Additionally, I've always known "crap" to be used equally to refer to both stuff/junk as well as excrement, as both a verb and a noun. With respect to the second meaning, I've always known it as not exactly swearing, but not exactly not. I remember elementary school teachers saying things like "That's not a word we use here." if a student would say it, but it wouldn't get a note sent home to your parents.

Having lived on the east coast, the west coast and in Texas, it's interesting to consider how widely the use of the same language varies, even in nearby places. There are a few words that use constantly in specific ways that I don't even know where exactly they come from but I know are not unique to me myself because every once in a blue moon, i'll hear them from someone else.