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Jehhillenberg
01-14-2013, 10:42 PM
Does anyone else watch this?

It follows an aspiring writer, Hannah, and her friends, all 20-somethings, post-college in New York. They're not rich. They're lost. They're very much representative of a generation.


I tuned into the show and love it now. I find it refreshingly realistic as I identify all too well with the characters and their lives at this point in my life.

kuwisdelu
01-14-2013, 11:06 PM
I've seen it. I liked it.

The first episodes were pretty good, and I think it got better as it went along.

Reminded me of a friend of mine who used to live in LA.

Jehhillenberg
01-14-2013, 11:26 PM
Yeah the first season was good so I'm looking forward to the new episodes.

Manuel Royal
01-14-2013, 11:32 PM
Saw the first couple of episodes, but found it annoying. The characters seemed whiny to me.

Jehhillenberg
01-14-2013, 11:37 PM
I've heard that from some reviews too.

Rhoda Nightingale
01-15-2013, 12:26 AM
I watched a couple episodes and loathed the characters. I can't imagine talking to my parents the way the main character does to hers, that attitude of entitlement and absolute lack of respect. I know it's not unrealistic in a larger sense, but it really put me off. Also the token virgin REALLY pissed me off.

cornflake
01-15-2013, 12:49 AM
Watched the first season, hate it deeply. I think it's badly, shallowly, written by someone who seems not to think narrative or character are important at all.

rugcat
01-15-2013, 01:17 AM
I think it's brilliant.

It's a bit like Sex and the City, one difference being that SATC was a fantasy about how women behave and talk and think -- written (albeit cleverly) mostly by gay men.

Girls is an authentic and very funny take about what it's like to be a twentysomething growing up in today's society -- written by Lena Dunham, a twentysomething young woman -- and a hugely talented one at that.

Just won the Golden Globes award for best comedy series, and Lena Dunham won for best actress in a comedy series -- both well deserved.

kuwisdelu
01-15-2013, 01:57 AM
Saw the first couple of episodes, but found it annoying. The characters seemed whiny to me.


I watched a couple episodes and loathed the characters. I can't imagine talking to my parents the way the main character does to hers, that attitude of entitlement and absolute lack of respect. I know it's not unrealistic in a larger sense, but it really put me off.

That's what we mean when we say


They're very much representative of a generation.

I take it ya'll aren't Brett Easton Ellis fans, either?

Jehhillenberg
01-15-2013, 03:14 AM
I think it's brilliant.

It's a bit like Sex and the City, one difference being that SATC was a fantasy about how women behave and talk and think -- written (albeit cleverly) mostly by gay men.

Girls is an authentic and very funny take about what it's like to be a twentysomething growing up in today's society -- written by Lena Dunham, a twentysomething young woman -- and a hugely talented one at that.

Just won the Golden Globes award for best comedy series, and Lena Dunham won for best actress in a comedy series -- both well deserved.

BAM. Exactly.

And they have references to "Sex & the City" throughout the show also, mainly through the formerly token virgin character, Shoshana. I think it may even have a touch of "Entourage" to it as far as the pack of girls go.

I am a new fan of Lena Dunham. I think she's doing it right.

I shall now live vicariously through Lena...acting, directing, writing, and producing her own show.

Rhoda Nightingale
01-15-2013, 03:36 AM
I take it ya'll aren't Brett Easton Ellis fans, either?

After all of one book I wouldn't call myself a "fan" yet, but I think he's brilliant, actually. I know why you're drawing the comparison, but honestly I can't put my finger on why this show bugs me, but American Psycho is one of my favorite books/movies ever.

Must be the token virgin. I really, really hate the token virgin.

J.S.F.
01-15-2013, 07:22 AM
I watched a few episodes. The acting is very good, very believable, which is probably why some of the characters piss me off. You know you're good at acting when the fans believe you really are that person...or so that saying goes. I wouldn't call myself a fan, but the show is generally very good in all aspects.

As for the token virgin, we all were...once. Things like that I let go. Will the show get better? Hope so.

Rhoda Nightingale
01-15-2013, 08:21 AM
As for the token virgin, we all were...once. Things like that I let go. Will the show get better? Hope so.

It's not that a token virgin exists in this show that bothers me--it's her character being depicted as a naive ditz. As a 29 year old virgin who is neither naive nor a ditz, I find that trope both insulting and unrealistic.

Jehhillenberg
01-15-2013, 09:46 AM
It's not that a token virgin exists in this show that bothers me--it's her character being depicted as a naive ditz. As a 29 year old virgin who is neither naive nor a ditz, I find that trope both insulting and unrealistic.

Since you elaborated on why you don't like her character, I do agree with that. I think that is just her personality though. I'd like to believe her personality and quirks are independent of and don't necessarily exist just because she happens(ed) to be virgin.

But that naive-quirky-odd-intelligent-sheltered trait often paired with being a virgin is getting/had gotten old. If the show took a different approach with being the token virgin or 20-something virgin in today's world, my mind would be blown to smithereens. That'd be awesome.

Now that that ship has sailed, her quirky personality is still there and she acts the same for the most part, just less obsessive about "losing it," her virginity.

lastlittlebird
01-15-2013, 10:31 AM
I love it, perhaps partly because most of the characters really annoy me. Those kinds of people annoy me in real life as well. But, I feel like the writers get that. It's not that they're oblivious.... the intent is to skewer that kind of self-centred behaviour.

Plus I have an unfortunate crush on Adam. Don't tell anyone.

Jehhillenberg
01-15-2013, 10:35 AM
I love it, perhaps partly because most of the characters really annoy me. Those kinds of people annoy me in real life as well. But, I feel like the writers get that. It's not that they're oblivious.... the intent is to skewer that kind of self-centred behaviour.

Plus I have an unfortunate crush on Adam. Don't tell anyone.

He had to grow on me, because he's a straight-up douche. But as Hannah pointed out, he is charming and he did come around eventually. The guy just says whatever the hell is on his mind at the moment. He's got no filter. But I like that to an extent. I started to feel like he had some sort of mental problem. He's hilarious, strange, and has a great bod, so I'm entertained :) haha

Jehhillenberg
01-15-2013, 10:36 AM
I also like the little variety of guys the show has so far.

lastlittlebird
01-15-2013, 11:07 AM
Yeah I like that too. Often with a "female-centric" show I feel like the male characters are all the same character, each with a slightly different problem of the week.
But the men of Girls are definitely individuals.

CharacterInWhite
01-15-2013, 11:00 PM
Did it occur to anybody else that the "token" virgin is a virgin because she's incredibly neurotic? She probably scares her potential partners away with her chatter-boxiness (yes I just made that a word).

I think she's neurotic first and virginal second...

I'm only on the third episode, mind you, but her character hasn't evoked quite the same reaction as everyone else. In fact, I'm mostly just afraid of her.

Jehhillenberg
01-15-2013, 11:46 PM
Did it occur to anybody else that the "token" virgin is a virgin because she's incredibly neurotic? She probably scares her potential partners away with her chatter-boxiness (yes I just made that a word).

I think she's neurotic first and virginal second...

I'm only on the third episode, mind you, but her character hasn't evoked quite the same reaction as everyone else. In fact, I'm mostly just afraid of her.

That's basically what I meant when I mentioned her personality. I think that is her personality and not necessarily *because* she's a virgin.

I think Shoshanna is an acquired taste. I didn't get her in the first couple of episodes, but she's just fine with me now; as the season progressed.

Rhoda Nightingale
01-16-2013, 12:16 AM
No, I get what you guys are saying--that personality type isn't necessarily tied to her virginity, which isn't a lasting thing. But like you said in post #14, the two traits (virginity and an excess of neuroses) are SO common they've become obnoxious, and this show isn't an exception to that. Also I'm tired of virginity being an ISSUE that must be resolved at some point in a character's development, but I guess that's too much to ask from most media, everywhere.

Eh, token virgin aside, I'm clearly not in the target demographic here anyway. From what I did see of it, I did think it was very realistically written and gritty. I just hated all the characters. That's a dealbreaker for me, no matter how clever or nuanced any other part of a work of fiction is.

Jehhillenberg
01-16-2013, 03:06 AM
No, I get what you guys are saying--that personality type isn't necessarily tied to her virginity, which isn't a lasting thing. But like you said in post #14, the two traits (virginity and an excess of neuroses) are SO common they've become obnoxious, and this show isn't an exception to that. Also I'm tired of virginity being an ISSUE that must be resolved at some point in a character's development, but I guess that's too much to ask from most media, everywhere.

Eh, token virgin aside, I'm clearly not in the target demographic here anyway. From what I did see of it, I did think it was very realistically written and gritty. I just hated all the characters. That's a dealbreaker for me, no matter how clever or nuanced any other part of a work of fiction is.

Very valid, indeed.

In this sex-crazed world, characters like Shoshanna (the virginal aspect) are a rare gem to come by.

And yeah, I love that realistic, gritty writing style of the show. Dialogue ain't bad at all either. :)

~~~~~~~~~~
Rhoda, what if a show was created based on the opposite angle of Sex & the City where the MC was a virgin and nothing was wrong with it or the person. More like Virgin in the (Sex) City :D

Rhoda Nightingale
01-16-2013, 08:22 AM
Rhoda, what if a show was created based on the opposite angle of Sex & the City where the MC was a virgin and nothing was wrong with it or the person. More like Virgin in the (Sex) City :D

Well that right there is one of the things I love about Jon Snow from Game of Thrones--he's celibate (at least so far, I've only read the first book, seen the first two seasons of the show), and it's mentioned a couple times, but it's not an Issue--it's a footnote in his character development, and only tends to come up when some other character wants to make a Thing of it.

Completely different genre and audience, I know, but boy, do I appreciate GRRM for giving the world that character. If he gets killed off, I will cry for days.

It would be nice if we could see a character like that in a contemporary setting though.

CrastersBabies
01-16-2013, 08:48 PM
I just caught a nice marathon of this on HBO (free for the weekend!). The pilot was a bit shaky, but it really grew into its own. Adam makes me laugh out loud.

Jehhillenberg
01-16-2013, 11:52 PM
Well that right there is one of the things I love about Jon Snow from Game of Thrones--he's celibate (at least so far, I've only read the first book, seen the first two seasons of the show), and it's mentioned a couple times, but it's not an Issue--it's a footnote in his character development, and only tends to come up when some other character wants to make a Thing of it.

Completely different genre and audience, I know, but boy, do I appreciate GRRM for giving the world that character. If he gets killed off, I will cry for days.

It would be nice if we could see a character like that in a contemporary setting though.

Here's hoping to that...


That is if I don't accomplish first :D

Jehhillenberg
01-16-2013, 11:53 PM
I just caught a nice marathon of this on HBO (free for the weekend!). The pilot was a bit shaky, but it really grew into its own. Adam makes me laugh out loud.

I caught up with it on-demand.

Adam might be one of those break-out characters on here. :roll:

Manuel Royal
01-18-2013, 07:33 PM
Well, I saw Lena Dunham on The Daily Show. She seems intelligent and fairly realistic about her work (and is really cute in the young-enough-to-be-my-daughter way). Maybe I'll give the show another chance. (Maybe the characters actually grow up a little.)

By the way, there's apparently a prequel Sex and the City show called The Carrie Diaries. You can see how a teenage girl grows into a self-centered, chain-smoking middle-aged halfwit who's inexplicably paid huge amounts of money for her shitty column.

Jehhillenberg
01-18-2013, 10:47 PM
That's what draws me to Lena. Her personality, let alone her work. She seems so familiar and just chill with her humor and all.

The characters are young and self-centered as expected. They'll grow up eventually. Right now, I just identify with them to a T, so...I'm biased.


As for "The Carrie Diaries". I didn't care enough to watch the show's premiere. "Sex In the City" was a little before my time and frankly I'm not a Carrie fan like that.

Niti Newtfinger
01-18-2013, 11:04 PM
I love Girls... I don't know anything about Sex and the City, but the way Lena Dunham responded to Howard Stern's comments about her recently made me love it even more. It's awesome to me when people can poke fun at themselves but also be clearly intelligent and poised.

Jehhillenberg
01-19-2013, 01:59 PM
That's another thing I love about the show. There aren't many, if any at all, characters like her as far as body type and size goes. She has a normal girl's body with meat and it isn't a bad thing or portrayed as bad thing. I love the confidence and don't-care attitude about it.

cornflake
01-19-2013, 02:08 PM
That's another thing I love about the show. There aren't many, if any at all, characters like her as far as body type and size goes. She has a normal girl's body with meat and it isn't a bad thing or portrayed as bad thing. I love the confidence and don't-care attitude about it.

I appreciate that she is a normal size and all that. However, I think the character's attitude is anything but don't-care and confident.

This is part of what I think is so weak about the writing and the show in general, actually. The whole Hannah's body deal.

The clothing is beyond ridiculous. It's not 'I wear whatever/I have my own style,' so much as it is 'watch this character wear the most ludicrous and horrid things we can dredge up, while both pretending to be oblivious to this and ranting about how self-conscious and self-critical she is.'

The same way Hannah doesn't care, doesn't diet, has tattoos, etc., then has bizarre 'all I do is self-criticize and worry about how I look and sound and etc.!' It might be realistic except that we see exactly none of that from the character except when Dunham seems to need a giant ranty rant, and the character actively behaves and speaks in contrast to the ranty rants, in both private and public.

The whole thing seems to me like there's no overarching concept whatsoever, no narrative ideas, it's just as if episodes are based on them sitting around going 'omg, you know what happened to me in college? This guy said... ' and another saying 'we TOTALLY have to put that in an episode!!' With no thought to any of it fitting into anything. It's a navel-gazing hipster mishmash of pseudo-profound bullshit.

Yeasayer
01-19-2013, 02:30 PM
I have a like/hate relationship with this show. The lack of diversity is disgusting and inexcusable for a TV show set in Brooklyn. Then there's the long list of offensive things Lena and her co-writers have spewed on Twitter. But it is nice to see a woman who isn't stereotypically beautiful starring in her own TV show (that's the like part).

Anyway, as someone who lived in the midst of hipsterdom Brooklyn for four years and only recently left, I think it's very hit or miss on the parody of living such a lifestyle. My favorite episode was the one where they went to a party in Bushwick, where I lived. Although, they didn't get it spot-on, I think it was pretty realistic and funny to see the ridiculousness of it all on screen.

cornflake
01-19-2013, 02:41 PM
Also, not for nothing, but how was her response to Stern ok?

'I'm fat but I'm not poor midwestern-level fat!' does not seem to me better than what he said, and perhaps worse. He only called her fat; he didn't drag the crap she did into it.

Jehhillenberg
01-19-2013, 02:49 PM
I appreciate that she is a normal size and all that. However, I think the character's attitude is anything but don't-care and confident.

This is part of what I think is so weak about the writing and the show in general, actually. The whole Hannah's body deal.

The clothing is beyond ridiculous. It's not 'I wear whatever/I have my own style,' so much as it is 'watch this character wear the most ludicrous and horrid things we can dredge up, while both pretending to be oblivious to this and ranting about how self-conscious and self-critical she is.'

The same way Hannah doesn't care, doesn't diet, has tattoos, etc., then has bizarre 'all I do is self-criticize and worry about how I look and sound and etc.!' It might be realistic except that we see exactly none of that from the character except when Dunham seems to need a giant ranty rant, and the character actively behaves and speaks in contrast to the ranty rants, in both private and public.

The whole thing seems to me like there's no overarching concept whatsoever, no narrative ideas, it's just as if episodes are based on them sitting around going 'omg, you know what happened to me in college? This guy said... ' and another saying 'we TOTALLY have to put that in an episode!!' With no thought to any of it fitting into anything. It's a navel-gazing hipster mishmash of pseudo-profound bullshit.


To me the confidence comes from the fact that she's pretty much naked in every episode around others. Not so much in declaration of confidence sort of way.

The clothing is what I see a lot of people wearing, at least of the age group. I have stuff similar to it. It's more thrift-store or vintage stuff with me.

The contradiction in her not caring about anything and yet being her toughest critic is part of growing up. Which she has a lot of to do. The character is trying to find herself.

As for the show, it's on the same level as "Freaks & Geeks," "Undeclared," and "My So-Called Life" (still catching up in reruns) for me and I like 'em.

Jehhillenberg
01-19-2013, 02:56 PM
I have a like/hate relationship with this show. The lack of diversity is disgusting and inexcusable for a TV show set in Brooklyn. Then there's the long list of offensive things Lena and her co-writers have spewed on Twitter. But it is nice to see a woman who isn't stereotypically beautiful starring in her own TV show (that's the like part).

Anyway, as someone who lived in the midst of hipsterdom Brooklyn for four years and only recently left, I think it's very hit or miss on the parody of living such a lifestyle. My favorite episode was the one where they went to a party in Bushwick, where I lived. Although, they didn't get it spot-on, I think it was pretty realistic and funny to see the ridiculousness of it all on screen.

I'm fascinated by this now. It's like you can mark off what's true or not as a fellow Brooklyn-er. :D

That's something I noticed. And they've gotten flack for the lack of diversity thing which is pretty important. I think that's why Donald Glover came into the story this season. There might be more.

Jehhillenberg
01-19-2013, 02:59 PM
Also, not for nothing, but how was her response to Stern ok?

'I'm fat but I'm not poor midwestern-level fat!' does not seem to me better than what he said, and perhaps worse. He only called her fat; he didn't drag the crap she did into it.

Those were her exact words?? Well in that case it really doesn't sound any better.

cornflake
01-19-2013, 03:11 PM
Those were her exact words?? Well in that case it really doesn't sound any better.

No, her exact words were close to (I don't have it in front of me, but it's close), 'I'm fat but I'm not Detroit fat.'

cornflake
01-19-2013, 03:20 PM
To me the confidence comes from the fact that she's pretty much naked in every episode around others. Not so much in declaration of confidence sort of way.

The clothing is what I see a lot of people wearing, at least of the age group. I have stuff similar to it. It's more thrift-store or vintage stuff with me.

The contradiction in her not caring about anything and yet being her toughest critic is part of growing up. Which she has a lot of to do. The character is trying to find herself.

As for the show, it's on the same level as "Freaks & Geeks," "Undeclared," and "My So-Called Life" (still catching up in reruns) for me and I like 'em.

The thing about the clothing, again, isn't that it's some weird pieces, it's all, like every single thing the character has on, the absolute worst-looking, most ill-fitting, most ridiculous outfits they can find. When it's gone that far it moves from characterization or quirk to caricature and joke.

I'd take it as trying to find herself if it ever hung together or made any sense. As it's seemingly random, nonsensical, and utterly bereft of connection, I don't. It's a television show. Whether she likes it or not, it's meant to be a form of storytelling, not random, disconnected moments that form a disjointed character with no seeming point.

Nothing drives Hannah. I have zero idea what that character is meant to want, at all. Which you may say lots of people her age don't know what they want - great, that's not a television show. Lots of people go to work, come home, eat a tv dinner and go to bed. I don't want to watch that either, no matter how much 'truth' it may speak.

She and her little pals seem to miss that entirely.

thebloodfiend
01-19-2013, 08:12 PM
/slight derail

Kill me now. I didn't think so-called intelligent people were still this (http://www.theatlanticwire.com/entertainment/2012/04/girls-writer-responds-critique-girls-horrible-joke/51314/) fucking stupid. This is why I cannot stand Bret Easton Ellis either. Upper-middle class white hipster douches are so fucking annoying. At least Pretty Little Liars tried. Representational of a generation, yes. A small annoying entitled segment of a generation.

Ironic racism is getting pretty damn old. But I forgot, it's just so damn hard being rich and white—at least attempting to introduce a non-white lead in New York of all places would take too much effort. This is probably why I'll never be a screenwriter. I'd strangle half the board on my show.

/end derail

If the show ever comes to Netflix, I might check it out. I've been reading a lot about it and it'd be good to see what actually wins Golden Globes now. I (sort of) liked My So-Called Life, despite the annoying MC. I hate Orson Scott Card, but I've managed to ignore half the shit he spews, too. His work is pretty racially diverse, though... odd.

Jehhillenberg
01-20-2013, 12:11 AM
/slight derail

Kill me now. I didn't think so-called intelligent people were still this (http://www.theatlanticwire.com/entertainment/2012/04/girls-writer-responds-critique-girls-horrible-joke/51314/) fucking stupid. This is why I cannot stand Bret Easton Ellis either. Upper-middle class white hipster douches are so fucking annoying. At least Pretty Little Liars tried. Representational of a generation, yes. A small annoying entitled segment of a generation.

Ironic racism is getting pretty damn old. But I forgot, it's just so damn hard being rich and white—at least attempting to introduce a non-white lead in New York of all places would take too much effort. This is probably why I'll never be a screenwriter. I'd strangle half the board on my show.

/end derail

If the show ever comes to Netflix, I might check it out. I've been reading a lot about it and it'd be good to see what actually wins Golden Globes now. I (sort of) liked My So-Called Life, despite the annoying MC. I hate Orson Scott Card, but I've managed to ignore half the shit he spews, too. His work is pretty racially diverse, though... odd.

This is what bothers me more than anything....with any form of entertainment -- let alone literature. I may be wrong, but I feel like the world is ready for a non-white lead. Apparently diversity has to take a backseat to other uber important problems.

I know there are a number of us out there working to change that.

kuwisdelu
01-20-2013, 02:19 AM
This is why I cannot stand Bret Easton Ellis either.

Heh. Called it.

thebloodfiend
01-20-2013, 02:53 AM
Heh. Called it.

Not really. I haven't seen the show. Rhonda has and she likes him, so your call is moot. I'm simply commenting on a tweet by one of their fucking idiot writers—who's like the epitome of white entitled hipster stupidity. Unless Easton is a closet case ironic douchebag hipster, too.

Do you like John Mayer?

kuwisdelu
01-20-2013, 02:57 AM
Not really. I haven't seen the show. Rhonda has and she likes him, so your call is moot. I'm simply commenting on a tweet by one of their fucking idiot writers—who's like the epitome of white entitled hipster stupidity. Unless Easton is a closet case ironic douchebag hipster, too.

I can't help but feel there's a big human element in both their works that goes beyond upper-class white hipster douchebags. Otherwise, I'd have a hard time identifying so well.

Maybe I'm just an upper middle class white hipster douchebag and never realized it.

ETA: Well, I guess I'm probably upper middle class, but I'm only half white.


Do you like John Mayer?

I don't listen to him much, but from what little I've heard, his music's okay.

I like Gackt?

thebloodfiend
01-20-2013, 03:14 AM
I can't help but feel there's a big human element in both their works that goes beyond upper-class white hipster douchebags. Otherwise, I'd have a hard time identifying so well.

Maybe I'm just an upper middle class white hipster douchebag and never realized it.

ETA: Well, I guess I'm probably upper middle class, but I'm only half white.



I don't listen to him much, but from what little I've heard, his music's okay.

I like Gackt?

I don't think you get what I'm saying.

I think Orson Scott Card is a homophobic douchebag. I, however, enjoy several of his books.

I think one of the writers of Girls is a white hipster douchebag. I have not watched the show, therefor, I cannot assign a value judgement upon it. I will not let what I think about her bias me towards the show if it ever makes it to Netflix.

Me not liking Easton has nothing to do with me liking or disliking Girls because I have not seen Girls. However, the attitude displayed by Easton's characters reminds me of that displayed by one of the idiot writers of Girls. I don't really care for Easton's writing because I couldn't care less for anything happening in his stories.

There's plenty of "deeper meaning" in Easton's writing, I'm sure. I've never read beyond the poor privileged whining of about 25-50% of any of his books I've picked up. And I've tried to read nearly all of them because I'm a fan of his premises. Just not the execution.

John Mayer is also an ironic racist white hipster douchebag who's pretty sexist half the time. However, he's a pretty good singer, IMO.

kuwisdelu
01-20-2013, 03:30 AM
Also, maybe it's because I'm 23, but I don't remember their outfits being weird. Their clothes looked like what lots of people my age might wear.

kuwisdelu
01-20-2013, 03:33 AM
I don't particularly remember the racist parts. I remember the lack of PoC characters.

Could you give an example?

thebloodfiend
01-20-2013, 03:52 AM
I don't particularly remember the racist parts. I remember the lack of PoC characters.

Could you give an example?I don't remember any racist parts from his work. Nor do I remember saying his characters were racist. Her comments and her attitude and her status remind me of his characters.

She is an entitled ironic racist white hipster douchebag. They were simply rich entitled white hipster douchebags.

What I said:
This is why I cannot stand Bret Easton Ellis either. Upper-middle class white hipster douches are so fucking annoying. At least Pretty Little Liars tried. Representational of a generation, yes. A small annoying entitled segment of a generation.

cornflake
01-20-2013, 03:55 AM
It's not their outfits - the other characters are dressed like people. It's just Dunham in the 'check it, she looks ridiculous and she like, doesn't know it! Or she doesn't care! Or she thinks it's funny! Or she's making a statement about some shit! Or she's poor! Or we have no idea, we just think it's really hilarious that she looks really bad all the time, isn't that like, totally hilarious? It's meaningful, right?' outfits.

kuwisdelu
01-20-2013, 04:18 AM
It's not their outfits - the other characters are dressed like people. It's just Dunham in the 'check it, she looks ridiculous and she like, doesn't know it! Or she doesn't care! Or she thinks it's funny! Or she's making a statement about some shit! Or she's poor! Or we have no idea, we just think it's really hilarious that she looks really bad all the time, isn't that like, totally hilarious? It's meaningful, right?' outfits.

I still don't get it. She dresses like lots of people I know dress.

I didn't think she looked bad.

Rhoda Nightingale
01-20-2013, 05:17 AM
Not really. I haven't seen the show. Rhonda has and she likes him, so your call is moot. I'm simply commenting on a tweet by one of their fucking idiot writers—who's like the epitome of white entitled hipster stupidity. Unless Easton is a closet case ironic douchebag hipster, too.

Do you like John Mayer?

*ahem*

There is no "n" in my name. It's an alias, yes, but it does not contain an "n." R-H-O-D-A. Not "Rhonda."

/rant

As you were. :)

(Although I'm a little mystified by the folks complaining about the costuming too--the clothes didn't strike me as remarkable in any way.)

thebloodfiend
01-20-2013, 05:38 AM
*ahem*

There is no "n" in my name. It's an alias, yes, but it does not contain an "n." R-H-O-D-A. Not "Rhonda."

/rant

As you were. :)

(Although I'm a little mystified by the folks complaining about the costuming too--the clothes didn't strike me as remarkable in any way.)

Sorry?

I've been Cori, Corey, Kori, Korey, and Kory on this board and various others. Such is iPhone spellcheck.

kuwisdelu
01-20-2013, 05:41 AM
I used to have a friend we called Corky. She was cool.

What?

thebloodfiend
01-20-2013, 05:43 AM
Corky is the girl who had a crush on the MC of Judy Blume's Then Again, Maybe I Won't.

kuwisdelu
01-20-2013, 06:02 AM
Corky is the girl who had a crush on the MC of Judy Blume's Then Again, Maybe I Won't.

The Corky I knew was a black girl who liked anime, enjoyed writing, and was a good artist.

I wonder what ever happened to her.

And Shi-shi. And Chibi. And everyone else from middle school...

(Yeah, we had lots of nicknames.)

Jehhillenberg
01-20-2013, 06:22 AM
Also, maybe it's because I'm 23, but I don't remember their outfits being weird. Their clothes looked like what lots of people my age might wear.

heyyyyyyyyy, could've sworn I brought up that point too!

:D

lastlittlebird
01-20-2013, 06:29 AM
It's not their outfits - the other characters are dressed like people. It's just Dunham in the 'check it, she looks ridiculous and she like, doesn't know it! Or she doesn't care! Or she thinks it's funny! Or she's making a statement about some shit! Or she's poor! Or we have no idea, we just think it's really hilarious that she looks really bad all the time, isn't that like, totally hilarious? It's meaningful, right?' outfits.

I don't want to sound like I'm making excuses, because I've definitely noticed that Lena's character isn't well dressed a lot of the time, but to me, she looks like she's following a particular style, the sort of hipster-esque one that involves raiding a lot of thrift stores, and she doesn't have what the clothing makers consider an average body, so she's not quite pulling it off every time.
I actually quite appreciate the fact that they've not broken down and tailored her thrift-store clothes, because I can relate to a character that isn't perfectly squared away in a form-fitting dress (although she's not got enough up top for the average dress and I've got too much).
I looked just as badly dressed at her age, because I can't afford tailored clothing and wanted to dress like the people I considered to be my peers.
Well, and also because I'm just no good at style in general... that's probably still true.

Jehhillenberg
01-20-2013, 06:32 AM
I can't help but feel there's a big human element in both their works that goes beyond upper-class white hipster douchebags. Otherwise, I'd have a hard time identifying so well.

Maybe I'm just an upper middle class white hipster douchebag and never realized it.

ETA: Well, I guess I'm probably upper middle class, but I'm only half white.



I don't listen to him much, but from what little I've heard, his music's okay.

I like Gackt?

The bold part is what immediately drew me to the show and characters, mainly Hannah. I'm not white either. I don't live in New York. But I am a "poor" college student still practically supported by my folks -- financially speaking anyway (when I look at the bigger picture). The writing thing is obvious. The awkward situations and all that good stuff is similar too. So I guess I just cast aside the hipster douchebagery because of the the other stuff I identified with. Maybe I' am a bit spoiled and ungrateful at times since I communicate with folks that same way Hannah does also. And apparently I'm not qualified enough for a typical job either.


*ahem*

There is no "n" in my name. It's an alias, yes, but it does not contain an "n." R-H-O-D-A. Not "Rhonda."

/rant

As you were. :)

(Although I'm a little mystified by the folks complaining about the costuming too--the clothes didn't strike me as remarkable in any way.)

R to the H to the O to the D to the A. You've made your feelings very clear and still accept all this. :D Cool.

kuwisdelu
01-20-2013, 06:56 AM
I looked just as badly dressed at her age, because I can't afford tailored clothing and wanted to dress like the people I considered to be my peers.

Ehh, I thought she looked fine. She looked like what I'm used to real people looking like, which surely probably isn't what most young women in expensive HBO series typically look like.


The bold part is what immediately drew me to the show and characters, mainly Hannah. I'm not white either. I don't live in New York. But I am a "poor" college student still practically supported by my folks -- financially speaking anyway (when I look at the bigger picture). The writing thing is obvious. The awkward situations and all that good stuff is similar too. So I guess I just cast aside the hipster douchebagery because of the the other stuff I identified with. Maybe I' am a bit spoiled and ungrateful at times since I communicate with folks that same way Hannah does also. And apparently I'm not qualified enough for a typical job either.

I think the part that struck me most was that feeling in your twenties when you look around at all the people you used to know, and it feels like they've moved on, they're passing you by, the world is changing, and you're still just.... stuck. And don't know what to do about it, or who you are, or where to go from here.

Jehhillenberg
01-20-2013, 07:09 AM
Yes. Is it the generation? I know that point in life held true for tons of people before now. But I feel like that "stuck" feeling is magnified now. Not to mention the impact of the economy on our futures and all.


I feel like this is one of those polarizing shows. Either you like it or you don't. Either you identify with it or you don't. Either you get it or you don't.

kuwisdelu
01-20-2013, 07:21 AM
Yes. Is it the generation? I know that point in life held true for tons of people before now. But I feel like that "stuck" feeling is magnified now. Not to mention the impact of the economy on our futures and all.

I think to a great deal it is the times and the current generation(s).

These days, for lots of places, you need a GED or high school diploma just to flip burgers. You need a BA or BS to get a regular office job pushing papers. We're all told "go to college, go to college." And then what? College doesn't prepare you for anything. So go to grad school. Still can't find a job? Get another degree. Get a PhD. Get a post-doc. Go move back in with your parents.

Yeah. Adolescence lasts forever now. But I don't think it's really an entitlement thing or an immaturity thing. It's how the world works now. It's how it was set up for us. We did what we were told. It's just that the promises were hollow, and there was nothing there to prepare anyone for anything, except how to be a perpetual student. We're the Lost Boys in Neverland.

I think it's always the result when the previous generation goes through hell in some form or other, works like hell to put the world back together, and tries their damned best to make sure their kids "don't have to worry about things like that," and "have opportunities." And then they're surprised at the result when their kids – who never had to worry about things like that — end up staying kids forever, and don't want to grow up, and don't want to suddenly have to start worrying about things like that.

The same thing's happening in Japan, and elsewhere in the world. Google "NEET".

cornflake
01-20-2013, 08:27 AM
I think Dunham's line, as that of so many before her, is clearly that people who dislike the show don't 'get it' or aren't in her demographic or what have you. I don't buy it at all.

First, it kind of implies a universality to her very, very unique experience of growing up a very rich, very particularly niche type of kid in a very particular part of an already tiny area.

Second, again, my main problem with the show is that it's not so much a show. I have no idea about the character because the character isn't written well. I don't get the sense she's written at all, by which I mean with any forethought or planning or narrative intent. I don't get narrative intent or internal life or anything from any of it.

It's just scenes of pseudo-philosophical hipster bullshit played out randomly, with no connection between events and if they contradict each other, oh, well, that's "real" and if you don't "get it" you're just not in her demographic or what have you. It's storytelling. It's been done in countless ways, framing countless eras and different groups, and it's worked because it has a point. There's no point.

Also, not for nothing, but Mamet is the only one of them who can act worth a damn and their lack of ability in that arena I think only magnifies the problems with the writing.

Oh, and I don't want or expect her to be dressed in tailored outfits or expensive, well-cut clothes. Stuff that doesn't make her look like she's waiting hopefully, perpetually, for someone to say something about her fugly, ill-fitting schmatta, no matter what situation, so she can whine about them doing so, would be nice.

kuwisdelu
01-20-2013, 09:01 AM
I think Dunham's line, as that of so many before her, is clearly that people who dislike the show don't 'get it' or aren't in her demographic or what have you. I don't buy it at all.

I think it's fine not to like it. I totally understand criticisms like "the characters are annoying." But I do think you're being a little unfair.

For example:


First, it kind of implies a universality to her very, very unique experience of growing up a very rich, very particularly niche type of kid in a very particular part of an already tiny area.

I grew up middle class, in the Midwest. I spend most of my summers as a child on the rez in New Mexico. I still find plenty to relate to in the show, so yes, there must be something more universal, or at least relatable to a wider audience, than what you're perceiving.

Some of your criticisms just don't make much sense to me.

CrastersBabies
01-20-2013, 10:30 AM
As a 42 year old woman, I love the show. I don't give one shit about hipster stuff (whatever that means, yeah, okay), or generation X, Y, Z. It's funny. I laugh.

I don't think it's about people "getting" the show or not getting it. I think it's simply about taste. What makes you laugh. What keeps you interested.

I can't watch most network television crap because it's so spoon-fed and formulaic that I want to gouge my eyes out, drink gasoline and swallow a match.

I see character-building. I see a narrative arc. If others don't or aren't into HOW these things are being executed, well, who cares? It's just not for you.

I don't watch CSI because I think it's crap. I "get" it. I just don't like it. But, I'm also not on the CSI thread pointing out the show's many flaws. I don't get people who watch shows they hate then jump online to write scathing retorts. Not just once, but multiple times. I get it if someone tries a show and hates it. Maybe writes a review for a blog, but I see lots of people (not necessarily on this message board, but others) who dedicate their time to bad-mouthing shows they hate. Over and over. And they continue to WATCH these shows JUST to bitch.

WTF?

You couldn't pay me to watch the stuff I didn't like. Revolution? God no. Anime of any kind? Please kill me. Why would I tune in just so I can hate it out loud for the world to see? Good grief. Emo, anyone?

(again not saying this about people here, I haven't read all replies, but I see it a lot on forums and the only thing it's good for is handing me my daily eyeroll.)

Anyway, that was an interesting tangent.

I can't watch season 2 until it hits netflix or whatnot (or until we sign up for HBO when Game of Thrones starts up again like we usually do). I think it's funny as hell and uncomfortable.

The odd thing? People talk about how "this is gen Z" or whatnot. This is how today's younger folks act.

Actually, it's pretty much the same as when I was that age. Nothing has changed. Not really. The clothes, maybe. The music. Yeah. But for the most part? It transcends generations, imho. The only difference is that nobody was writing and producing stuff this honest back in my day. Nobody shined a big light on 20-somethings in THIS manner. Now? Yes. And I am so sucked in.

Cannot wait to see season 2.

BenPanced
01-20-2013, 10:51 AM
I don't get people who watch shows they hate then jump online to write scathing retorts. Not just once, but multiple times. I get it if someone tries a show and hates it. Maybe writes a review for a blog, but I see lots of people (not necessarily on this message board, but others) who dedicate their time to bad-mouthing shows they hate. Over and over. And they continue to WATCH these shows JUST to bitch.

WTF?
"If you hate the show so much, why do you keep watching it?"

"Because if I don't, how else are other people going to know how much it sucks?"

Jehhillenberg
01-20-2013, 12:55 PM
I think to a great deal it is the times and the current generation(s).

These days, for lots of places, you need a GED or high school diploma just to flip burgers. You need a BA or BS to get a regular office job pushing papers. We're all told "go to college, go to college." And then what? College doesn't prepare you for anything. So go to grad school. Still can't find a job? Get another degree. Get a PhD. Get a post-doc. Go move back in with your parents.

Yeah. Adolescence lasts forever now. But I don't think it's really an entitlement thing or an immaturity thing. It's how the world works now. It's how it was set up for us. We did what we were told. It's just that the promises were hollow, and there was nothing there to prepare anyone for anything, except how to be a perpetual student. We're the Lost Boys in Neverland.

I think it's always the result when the previous generation goes through hell in some form or other, works like hell to put the world back together, and tries their damned best to make sure their kids "don't have to worry about things like that," and "have opportunities." And then they're surprised at the result when their kids – who never had to worry about things like that — end up staying kids forever, and don't want to grow up, and don't want to suddenly have to start worrying about things like that.

The same thing's happening in Japan, and elsewhere in the world. Google "NEET".

wow, I've never felt more hopeless or pitiful before googling "NEET." Thanks a lot, kuwisdelu, thanks a lot man.

Jehhillenberg
01-20-2013, 01:12 PM
I think Dunham's line, as that of so many before her, is clearly that people who dislike the show don't 'get it' or aren't in her demographic or what have you. I don't buy it at all.

First, it kind of implies a universality to her very, very unique experience of growing up a very rich, very particularly niche type of kid in a very particular part of an already tiny area.

Second, again, my main problem with the show is that it's not so much a show. I have no idea about the character because the character isn't written well. I don't get the sense she's written at all, by which I mean with any forethought or planning or narrative intent. I don't get narrative intent or internal life or anything from any of it.

It's just scenes of pseudo-philosophical hipster bullshit played out randomly, with no connection between events and if they contradict each other, oh, well, that's "real" and if you don't "get it" you're just not in her demographic or what have you. It's storytelling. It's been done in countless ways, framing countless eras and different groups, and it's worked because it has a point. There's no point.

Also, not for nothing, but Mamet is the only one of them who can act worth a damn and their lack of ability in that arena I think only magnifies the problems with the writing.

Oh, and I don't want or expect her to be dressed in tailored outfits or expensive, well-cut clothes. Stuff that doesn't make her look like she's waiting hopefully, perpetually, for someone to say something about her fugly, ill-fitting schmatta, no matter what situation, so she can whine about them doing so, would be nice.

I'm starting to get the feeling you don't like this show.

Jehhillenberg
01-20-2013, 01:46 PM
As a 42 year old woman, I love the show. I don't give one shit about hipster stuff (whatever that means, yeah, okay), or generation X, Y, Z. It's funny. I laugh.

I don't think it's about people "getting" the show or not getting it. I think it's simply about taste. What makes you laugh. What keeps you interested.

I can't watch most network television crap because it's so spoon-fed and formulaic that I want to gouge my eyes out, drink gasoline and swallow a match.

I see character-building. I see a narrative arc. If others don't or aren't into HOW these things are being executed, well, who cares? It's just not for you.

I don't watch CSI because I think it's crap. I "get" it. I just don't like it. But, I'm also not on the CSI thread pointing out the show's many flaws. I don't get people who watch shows they hate then jump online to write scathing retorts. Not just once, but multiple times. I get it if someone tries a show and hates it. Maybe writes a review for a blog, but I see lots of people (not necessarily on this message board, but others) who dedicate their time to bad-mouthing shows they hate. Over and over. And they continue to WATCH these shows JUST to bitch.

WTF?

You couldn't pay me to watch the stuff I didn't like. Revolution? God no. Anime of any kind? Please kill me. Why would I tune in just so I can hate it out loud for the world to see? Good grief. Emo, anyone?

(again not saying this about people here, I haven't read all replies, but I see it a lot on forums and the only thing it's good for is handing me my daily eyeroll.)

Anyway, that was an interesting tangent.

I can't watch season 2 until it hits netflix or whatnot (or until we sign up for HBO when Game of Thrones starts up again like we usually do). I think it's funny as hell and uncomfortable.

The odd thing? People talk about how "this is gen Z" or whatnot. This is how today's younger folks act.

Actually, it's pretty much the same as when I was that age. Nothing has changed. Not really. The clothes, maybe. The music. Yeah. But for the most part? It transcends generations, imho. The only difference is that nobody was writing and producing stuff this honest back in my day. Nobody shined a big light on 20-somethings in THIS manner. Now? Yes. And I am so sucked in.

Cannot wait to see season 2.

I don't give one shit about "hipster" stuff either. TBH, I kinda hate the term because it's right up there with "ghetto," by way of the negative connotations associated and how it's used lowering certain groups.

I digress.


TV shows primarily are meant to entertain and I find this show entertaining. I also see storytelling.

Yes, I "get" a lot of shows I don't like. By that I mean I understand them and accept how they work. But on the other hand sometimes I may not "get" the appeal of some shows.

One appeal of GIRLS is the 20-something characters wandering aimlessly through life "one mistake at a time" (quote from line in a episode). <Okay, that isn't the most stimulating or exciting hook, but the show is getting buzz.> A lot of people connect with the show from that angle.

And I love that you also pointed out how universal the stage of life is that it transcends generations.

kuwisdelu
01-20-2013, 01:51 PM
The label "hipster" has become so overused that it has become utterly meaningless.

Jehhillenberg
01-20-2013, 02:02 PM
I should be numb to it by now.

cornflake
01-20-2013, 04:14 PM
I think it's fine not to like it. I totally understand criticisms like "the characters are annoying." But I do think you're being a little unfair.

For example:



I grew up middle class, in the Midwest. I spend most of my summers as a child on the rez in New Mexico. I still find plenty to relate to in the show, so yes, there must be something more universal, or at least relatable to a wider audience, than what you're perceiving.

Some of your criticisms just don't make much sense to me.

I didn't say there weren't universalities in it or that people didn't relate to it from all different areas.

I said I think her idea that people who dislike it do so because they fail to "get it" and are not in her demographic implies a universality to her experience and demographic that the people that like it get and those that don't, don't. Except her experience is incredibly particular.

Pretty much every human story has aspects other people will relate to. A show about someone going to work, coming home, eating a tv dinner and going to bed has themes that many people will relate to. However, if someone criticized the show and the creator replied that criticizing it meant that that person didn't understand people who went to work and came home, that'd be ridiculous. There are plenty of legitimate reasons to criticize something not based in 'you just don't understand me.'

As to -


"If you hate the show so much, why do you keep watching it?"

"Because if I don't, how else are other people going to know how much it sucks?"

I'm not watching it now, because no, I don't like it. I didn't realize discussing a show or book or movie was restricted to those who thought the things were good, or that everyone else in the world stopped watching, reading, etc., everything the moment they decided they might not like it much.

I watched it originally because it had such crazy publicity and buzz. I watched the whole season, because I tend not to dismiss stuff that should have a long narrative too instantly. If someone else does, well, yay? I mean who cares?

I read the whole of the first Twilight too and I've sat through movies I didn't think were good at first. Sometimes they got better; sometimes they got worse, sometimes they were meh.

It's a method of storytelling. This is a writing board. I kind of figured people might discuss the plots, writing, etc., of television shows and movies in the subform devoted to such. If this is just for people to say they like Girls then... :Shrug:

CrastersBabies
01-20-2013, 09:06 PM
The label "hipster" has become so overused that it has become utterly meaningless.

What in the world does it even mean now? I was wearing dark-rimmed glasses back in the 90's. Why? Because people said I looked like Tina Fey when I wore them and she is AWeeeesome!

Can't think of anyone less "hipster" than that.

Is it about skinny jeans?

I don't get it. None of these guys or girls seem "hipster" by my definition. Maybe I'm thinking of beatniks. Maybe I just aged myself a little too much. :) (Then again, I did say I Was 42.) They just seem like regular people and I LOVE that about the show. The show isn't full of super shiny, ultra perfect actors. Even Jessa has her flaws, as does Marnie.

When I want perfect people, I watch the Vampire Diaries. I get my fill there (and yeah, I like that show too).

This is just plain entertaining for me. I'm so glad that Lena Dunham won best actress and the show got best comedy at the golden globes. I really think they earned it.

BenPanced
01-20-2013, 09:23 PM
I'm not watching it now, because no, I don't like it. I didn't realize discussing a show or book or movie was restricted to those who thought the things were good, or that everyone else in the world stopped watching, reading, etc., everything the moment they decided they might not like it much.

I watched it originally because it had such crazy publicity and buzz. I watched the whole season, because I tend not to dismiss stuff that should have a long narrative too instantly. If someone else does, well, yay? I mean who cares?

I read the whole of the first Twilight too and I've sat through movies I didn't think were good at first. Sometimes they got better; sometimes they got worse, sometimes they were meh.

It's a method of storytelling. This is a writing board. I kind of figured people might discuss the plots, writing, etc., of television shows and movies in the subform devoted to such. If this is just for people to say they like Girls then... :Shrug:
I posted the quote because somebody posted something that reminded me of it. It's from a comic strip about somebody who doesn't like Star Trek Enterprise, but keeps watching and blogging about how horrible he thinks it is. That's all. No watchdog involved.

CrastersBabies
01-20-2013, 09:37 PM
I'm not watching it now, because no, I don't like it. I didn't realize discussing a show or book or movie was restricted to those who thought the things were good, or that everyone else in the world stopped watching, reading, etc., everything the moment they decided they might not like it much.

I watched it originally because it had such crazy publicity and buzz. I watched the whole season, because I tend not to dismiss stuff that should have a long narrative too instantly. If someone else does, well, yay? I mean who cares?

I read the whole of the first Twilight too and I've sat through movies I didn't think were good at first. Sometimes they got better; sometimes they got worse, sometimes they were meh.

It's a method of storytelling. This is a writing board. I kind of figured people might discuss the plots, writing, etc., of television shows and movies in the subform devoted to such. If this is just for people to say they like Girls then... :Shrug:

Sorry, Cornflake, didn't mean to come across that way. I didn't read your comment(s) that I remember, so definitely wasn't directing things at you. I get it if you get into a conversation and keep it going. What I see on boards (this one in particular dedicated to one of my favorite authors) is that every week, literally, people will watch a show they hate and log in to say they why they hated the episode and they'll be a bit weird to others who do enjoy it.

I don't even know if new episodes are on now? I just caught a marathon on HBO (free for the weekend).

Sorry if I confused!

thebloodfiend
01-20-2013, 10:08 PM
The label "hipster" has become so overused that it has become utterly meaningless.

There are bros.
There are wangsters.
There are weeaboos.
There are the chollos.
There are the metrosexuals.
And then there are the hipsters.

And they can also morph together, like pokemon cards, and then you get the brosters. Or the newest to be discovered, the neo-hippie, the less annoying relative of the hipster. They also evolve, such as emo to scene. Or they're simply dying out very slowly, like the goth and the yuppie.

It's a very simplistic way to categorize people, but typically, only the hipsters douches (and not all hipsters are douches, nor are all hipsters white, though the majority are white) are into ironic racism. (http://jezebel.com/5905291/a-complete-guide-to-hipster-racism)


By the way, almost everyone I know wears skinny jeans and wayfarers now, cratersbabies.

rugcat
01-20-2013, 10:28 PM
The label "hipster" has become so overused that it has become utterly meaningless."Hipster Doofus."

http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r33/rugcat/250px-Cosmo_Kramer.jpg

CharacterInWhite
01-21-2013, 08:42 AM
The show keeps pushing this premise that good guys suck at sex (I'm only half way through S1 mind you).

This bugs me. It's like, just because I respect you as a human being doesn't mean I can't chain you to a post and fuck you silly if that's what you're in to. I feel like Hannah and Marnie could do better to express their preferences with new partners. How else are they supposed to know? Just a quick "rougher" or "don't say/do that" and Hannah would've had more fun with the bland pharmacist dude.

Jehhillenberg
01-21-2013, 11:06 AM
The show keeps pushing this premise that good guys suck at sex (I'm only half way through S1 mind you).

This bugs me. It's like, just because I respect you as a human being doesn't mean I can't chain you to a post and fuck you silly if that's what you're in to. I feel like Hannah and Marty could do better to express their preferences with new partners. How else are they supposed to know? Just a quick "rougher" or "don't say/do that" and Hannah would've had more fun with the bland pharmacist dude.

Hannah wasn't into the pharmacy guy she hooked up with. And so the sex was bleh. She was still hung up on Adam for whatever her reasons were at that point in time. She was used to his ways of screwing her and tried that on pharmacy guy, it seemed. High expectations with this new sex partner? Idk.

As for Marnie and Charlie, I'm totally on Charlie's side. Marnie seemed miserable (not only in the sex department) with him and yet didn't want to break it off. Simply verbalizing her desires would've gone a long way. Unless she was just over the relationship. Still.

I blamed the girls in that case. I saw them being unsatisfied with something. I didn't immediately think the good guys were bad at sex. And it totally could have been the girls and not the guys that's the problem. (Poor Charlie resorts to porn cuz sex between he and Marnie drags.) I'm sure Jessa has plenty good sex because she knows what she wants and takes action, "Put your hand down my pants." And hello Mrs. Big-Red-Period! :D


Tonight's episode actually made me want to slap Hannah all over the room and back again.

:)

CrastersBabies
01-21-2013, 08:27 PM
They're 20-something girls. Most girls that age don't or won't express their likes/preferences. At least that's my experience. I think that's what they were trying to show.

And yeah, I'm definitely more on team Charlie.

Why are the other guys bad? Adam was just kinky. I didn't see him as necessarily being "bad" at sex. And the guy who slept with Shoshona the first time? Totally hot.

Jehhillenberg
01-22-2013, 01:29 AM
That kinky Adam :whip:

BeatrixKiddo
01-24-2013, 07:15 AM
I just rented this show and watched the entire first season all at once. Even though I'm going on 40, I loved this delightful little show. And even though I'm going on 40, I LOVED that young gorgeous boy pharmacist. I would sooo be a cougar for him. Good lord, that boy was fine.

I like the dynamics set up between everyone. No matter how many generations come through, we seem to stay screwed up and dysfunctional over the same issues when it comes to dating and relationships.

Jehhillenberg
01-26-2013, 10:39 AM
I just rented this show and watched the entire first season all at once. Even though I'm going on 40, I loved this delightful little show. And even though I'm going on 40, I LOVED that young gorgeous boy pharmacist. I would sooo be a cougar for him. Good lord, that boy was fine.

I like the dynamics set up between everyone. No matter how many generations come through, we seem to stay screwed up and dysfunctional over the same issues when it comes to dating and relationships.

I'd so go for the pharmacy guy too!