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Bulletproof
01-11-2013, 09:50 PM
What's the fastest way to get my stories off of Apple? After seeing my first, shockingly low, sales report, I investigated and found the iBooks preview is giving away 100% of my stories. I already emailed Smashwords and clicked buttons to stop distribution. I'm going to email Apple next, but with Smashwords listed as the publisher, I doubt they'll pay attention to me.

And yes, I (now) know that it's a table of contents thing.

merrihiatt
01-11-2013, 10:01 PM
Why not wait for the issue to be fixed before having your titles pulled?

Bulletproof
01-11-2013, 10:12 PM
Why not wait for the issue to be fixed before having your titles pulled?
Hi, Merri. Good to see you back :)

That was my first plan. But it takes over 6 weeks for my stories to make it from Smashwords to iBooks. 1/3 of my catalog just went live there within the last few days, so I'd rather not give these away for free for another month and a half. (And I have another 3 books that are likely close to going live.)

Plus, I'm thinking it's time for me to go direct with Apple.

Ann Joyce
01-11-2013, 11:14 PM
Oh wow...I'm really sorry to hear that, Bulletproof. I sure hope you can get to the bottom of it. Wish I had the knowledge to know how to help you with it.

Katie Elle
01-12-2013, 12:29 AM
It's been going on since the summer and multiple people have complained. Their response to me last month was:


Thanks for your email. Our Technical Team is working with Apple to resolve this issue. In the meantime, you can speed up the process by creating natural breaks in the story so that the Apple system properly provides only a sample instead of the whole book. To do so, create a linked TOC per Step 20 of the Style Guide, or make all headings into a "Heading Style."

I'm slowly moving my things over to draft2digital which doesn't have this issue, is far more responsive, and doesn't nitpick formatting in your epubs.

Bulletproof
01-12-2013, 03:50 AM
Oh wow...I'm really sorry to hear that, Bulletproof.
Thanks. That's very kind of you to say. I hope other self-published writers will be motivated to check if their books are also being given away in the sample.


It's been going on since the summer and multiple people have complained.
That long? I'm not sure which company should be the target of my ire, but I'm leaning toward Apple. My lawyer, the first person with an ipad I could get ahold of, (jokingly) keeps offering to sue. If they weren't so big, I would.

But SW could have given me a heads-up. I feel like I've been paying them to treat me like a mushroom.

Draft2digital looks like a great service in many ways, so I submitted my email for a beta code. But, gosh, I'm leery of handing control over to another middleman. It's a strange choice: control of my books weighed against keeping my name private.

Medievalist
01-12-2013, 03:59 AM
I'm not seeing this with any of the books I produced.

Did you all make your books by exporting and importing from MS Word, or Calibre or other apps?

Did you check your books in terms of the xml files, meta data and live TOC?

I've checked about twenty of the books I've made and am not seeing this, even on books made in 2010 for the iBooks bookstore.

Is this a Smashwords only thing? Even the books I created for various authors are fine, so I'm wondering if it's tied to a specific app.

Katie Elle
01-12-2013, 05:18 AM
It's a Smashwords thing, my Scrivener ePub is fine.

merrihiatt
01-12-2013, 09:02 AM
I just checked three of my books and the samples were fine. Hm...

merrihiatt
01-12-2013, 09:10 AM
Hi, Merri. Good to see you back :)

That was my first plan. But it takes over 6 weeks for my stories to make it from Smashwords to iBooks. 1/3 of my catalog just went live there within the last few days, so I'd rather not give these away for free for another month and a half. (And I have another 3 books that are likely close to going live.)

Plus, I'm thinking it's time for me to go direct with Apple.

Thanks. I've been trying to snag free WiFi whenever I can.

Oh, yes, the lag. How could I forget about that? It could take six weeks to get the titles removed, too. What a dilemma!

Old Hack
01-12-2013, 12:34 PM
With all due respect to everyone here who is experiencing this problem, I've been told by a friend in the trade that this issue is caused by poor formatting by the publisher, prior to downloading the books, so anyone who is experiencing this might want to look at how they produced their e-books.

I can't remember the exact details, I'm afraid, but apparently books which were hand-coded are fine: only books which were produced by text dumps are affected. The real issue might not be the methods used to reach publication, however: as I see it, it could be that people who hand-code their books know more about the various problems that e-book formatting can involve than do the people who rely on software to do most of the work for them.

I know how difficult it is to get formatting right: I'm hopeless at it on any platform, so I have huge sympathy for those affected, and I'm really not saying this to upset anyone, or to indulge in smug finger-wagging: but this thread reminded me, sadly, of some of our recent discussions here about typesetting and formatting.

Good fonts to use when printing a book? (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=259483)

Type-setting Software suggestions? (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=261395)

Amazon's dubious Christmas gift to authors and ebook formatters (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=261006)

Getting formatting right is so important: this problem with the iBooks bookstore just reinforces that. If our books aren't formatted well then our readers aren't going to want to read our books and they're certainly not going to buy any more from us. Even when they can get them all for free. Oh dear.

I'll see if I can get hold of something more informative about the problem but meanwhile Medievalist's comment struck me as useful:


Did you check your books in terms of the xml files, meta data and live TOC?

As I said, I'm no expert: but from what I've heard this could be at the root of it.

I hope you all get this resolved. It's such a big issue. My sympathies.

Katie Elle
01-12-2013, 07:50 PM
With all due respect to everyone here who is experiencing this problem, I've been told by a friend in the trade that this issue is caused by poor formatting by the publisher, prior to downloading the books, so anyone who is experiencing this might want to look at how they produced their e-books.

I can't remember the exact details, I'm afraid, but apparently books which were hand-coded are fine: only books which were produced by text dumps are affected. The real issue might not be the methods used to reach publication, however: as I see it, it could be that people who hand-code their books know more about the various problems that e-book formatting can involve than do the people who rely on software to do most of the work for them.

The problem here is that hand crafting html or an epub isn't or more accurately wasn't an option for the 86.4% of computer users who don't use Macs. This is about books run through Smashwords. They are an aggregator who, until a few weeks ago, was the only real option for people with Windows based computers to reach iBooks or for non-US residents to reach Barnes and Noble/Nook.

Smashwords accepted only Word 2003/doc format files. You couldn't handcraft html or provide an epub. You had to upload a doc file and the formatting options allowed were extremely limited.

Smashwords "meatgrinder" (their terminology) would convert the doc file into several formats, including epubs which they would then send on to iBooks, B&N, Kobo, Sony, and whomever else. You had absolutely no control over final formatting or construction of these files other than to tweak your doc file and upload again. In addition, once it goes live with a retailer, it seems to be almost impossible to get them to switch to an updated version.

I don't know anyone who liked the system, but it was the only option other than buying a Macintosh. I loathe the Smashwords formatting to the point where I take ARCs sent to me through them and reformat through Calibre. People have been badgering Smashwords for months, if not years, to accept direct upload of epub or html files and they finally started to accept epubs at 3:30pm est on December 31st, meeting a promise (at least for the western half of the world) to allow it by the end of 2012.

That may be too little, too late. There's a very aggressive new competitor (draft2digital) that accepts epub uploads directly and also accepts doc files and from reports I've heard does a far better job of converting them to epub. I have one book up with D2D that's gone live on Apple and there's no problems. I uploaded my epub and it looks great. However, as with any startup, you're never sure how it will turn out until they have a longer term track record. My guess is they are going to be wearing moneyhats (http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2000/10/23).

It's quite easy to put together a very nice looking book with Scrivener or Word and Calibre (http://www.klerotica.com/?p=114) (NSFW) that has a proper html and NCX TOC, pleasant to read formatting, and passes full epub validation. It's very difficult to do the same with the Smashwords meatgrinder. The meatgrinder is really a vestige of the ancient days (four or five years ago) when e-books were strange beasts of interest only to the technorati.

Al Stevens
01-12-2013, 08:32 PM
The problem here is that hand crafting html or an epub isn't or more accurately wasn't an option for the 86.4% of computer users who don't use Macs.
Or for the 99.999% (swag) who don't know html and css.


I don't know anyone who liked the system, but it was the only option other than buying a Macintosh.
There is another option. Turn your PC into a Mac.

http://lifehacker.com/5583650

But you really need techie chops. I haven't done it yet. I keep staring at the downloaded files wondering whether they'll eat my computer. I need to get my sacrificial PC up and running in order to try it.


I loathe the Smashwords formatting...
I dislike their abysmally slow responsiveness to customer questions and concerns. I had a book with them and finally unpublished when I couldn't get a simple problem resolved.

Old Hack
01-12-2013, 10:15 PM
The problem here is that hand crafting html or an epub isn't or more accurately wasn't an option for the 86.4% of computer users who don't use Macs. This is about books run through Smashwords. They are an aggregator who, until a few weeks ago, was the only real option for people with Windows based computers to reach iBooks or for non-US residents to reach Barnes and Noble/Nook.


Or for the 99.999% (swag) who don't know html and css.

To summarise, people who donít know how to hand-code and donít have access to a Mac canít get their books into the iBooks bookstore unassisted. The Smashwords meatgrinder does send books to iBooks, but that same meatgrinder introduces these errors.

The way around that, then, is surely for those people to hire people who do know how to code, and do have access to Macs? Isnít that better than using the meatgrinder and knowing itís going to end up in a book which is essentially unreadable, but selling it anyway?

I know we canít all afford to spend money on stuff like this: but itís better to be unpublished than published badly; itís better to not have books available at all than to alienate our paying readers by selling them substandard books.

This seems to me yet another example of people trying to cut corners when self publishing, and assuming that experience and expertise can be replaced by cheap or free software.

kaitie
01-12-2013, 10:39 PM
I actually agree. I think this is a good reason a lot of people would be helped by paying someone for formatting. It's one of the reasons I haven't self-published my own didn't sell book yet. I just don't have the money to do it for another year or two, taking into account my personal limitations in what I can and can't do.

Medievalist
01-12-2013, 11:12 PM
The problem here is that hand crafting html or an epub isn't or more accurately wasn't an option for the 86.4% of computer users who don't use Macs.

Oh nonsense Katie.

It's not that hard to find someone with a Mac who'll help you out. Or hire someone, or rent an hour or two on someone's Mac.

Apple offers an approved list of aggregators (https://itunesconnect.apple.com/WebObjects/iTunesConnect.woa/wa/displayAggregators?ccTypeId=13); SmashWords isn't the only option.

I know two authors re-releasing their backlist titles as ebooks who discovered that their local library was happy to install iTunes Connect for them to use on a library Mac.

There are also professionals who will do the formatting and upload for a fee.

It's partly a problem related to user arrogance, frankly, thinking that owning the right software is all that's required.

Bulletproof
01-12-2013, 11:18 PM
That high-pitched wail you all heard a few hours ago? That was me discovering that two more of my books (including my bestseller, my gateway drug if you will) are live (and "free") at Apple. The only good news? "...they all look very good, formats look great, descriptions of the other titles at the conclusions of each..." I wouldn't have known to ask about that if not for the responses in this thread, so thank you.

Not everyone who uses Smashwords doesn't have a Mac. My issues are Apple's insistence on inserting my (unique) legal name into the seller field, and, to a lesser extent, the (formerly mandatory) ISBN.

I have to say that Scrivener, at least the Mac version, makes gorgeous mobi and epub files with the click of a button. The trick is to create the whole project in Scrivener (versus writing in Word and importing or pasting). There are also some compile settings that want tweaking for aesthetic reasons. I've been unsatisfied when converting files with Calibre, which I think is better suited for personal use.

Katie Elle
01-12-2013, 11:29 PM
The way around that, then, is surely for those people to hire people who do know how to code, and do have access to Macs? Isnít that better than using the meatgrinder and knowing itís going to end up in a book which is essentially unreadable, but selling it anyway?


Well Apple has someone they recommend to format your books and upload them to Apple: Smashwords. We're actually talking about the officially recognized and recommended provider for this service.

If you go to a commercial formatting service, you will most likely get a package back that includes a mobi for KDP, an epub for B&N/Kobo, and a "meatgrinder compatible" DOC file for Smashwords. In other words, even if you go to an expert, you still end up feeding a doc into the meatgrinder. This really is about the Mac requirement, not about formatting.

Hiring a formatter or someone else to upload directly would require you handing all of your Apple login and passwords to them, which further would open up the payment information (ie, your bank account), and letting them manage your account, make price changes, keep you informed of sales reports, and so on which isn't appealing on either the author or formatter side of things. I'm not even sure it's acceptable under their TOS.

What really was needed was Smashwords allowing epub uploads which they finally do and competition in the aggregator market, which Draft2Digital is providing. I have a sneaking suspicion those two developments are related.

Are Smashwords books unreadable? That might be putting it a little too strongly. It's not as if they have incorrect line feeds in the middle of sentences or lose all their italics or anything like that. I just find them very cramped and given that I'm side loading them onto my kindle through Calibre anyway, it's far preferable to me to add the 15 seconds it takes to have it make them more to my liking. I've done the same with a lot of trade published books as well.

FWIW for those trying to actually fix issues with the sample being given away. I uploaded epubs to Smashwords on the 1st and sent a note to Smashwords customer service that they request Apple to refresh the files. Smash said this was done a few days ago, but Apple hasn't actually replaced the files. Whether that's a miscommunication between Apple and Smash or that Apple is just plain not going to do it only time will tell. That was what finally led me to look at the new provider despite their lack of a long term track record.

I am selling more and more on Apple, which is kind of amazing given that payment is defacto optional. I'll be interested to see what happens when I have everything switched over.

Old Hack
01-12-2013, 11:50 PM
Well Apple has someone they recommend to format your books and upload them to Apple: Smashwords. We're actually talking about the officially recognized and recommended provider for this service.

But as Medie wrote earlier,


Oh nonsense Katie.

It's not that hard to find someone with a Mac who'll help you out. Or hire someone, or rent an hour or two on someone's Mac.

Apple offers an approved list of aggregators (https://itunesconnect.apple.com/WebObjects/iTunesConnect.woa/wa/displayAggregators?ccTypeId=13); SmashWords isn't the only option.

My bold.

There are alternatives. And you could always use a library computer, or find a friend who has one.


If you go to a commercial formatting service, you will most likely get a package back that includes a mobi for KDP, an epub for B&N/Kobo, and a "meatgrinder compatible" DOC file for Smashwords. In other words, even if you go to an expert, you still end up feeding a doc into the meatgrinder. This really is about the Mac requirement, not about formatting.

Why would you pay someone to do something for you that isn't right and isn't what you want?

If you pay someone to do your formatting for you, then you should specify exactly what you want. If they can't or won't give you what you want, go somewhere else. You shouldn't still be stuck with Smashwords if that's not what you want, especially as there are obviously alternatives.


Hiring a formatter or someone else to upload directly would require you handing all of your Apple login and passwords to them, which further would open up the payment information (ie, your bank account), and letting them manage your account, make price changes, keep you informed of sales reports, and so on which isn't appealing on either the author or formatter side of things. I'm not even sure it's acceptable under their TOS.

I can't comment on whether or not this would violate Apple's terms and conditions, as I've not read them: but I can't imagine that such T&C would forbid allowing a publisher's agents to use the publisher's account.

The solution to the issue of giving someone else your password is to change that password once they've done the work you've paid them to do.

And I don't understand why you'd have to hand over control of everything just so that they could format and download your book for you. Once that was done, you could, as I've already suggested, change your password and run the account yourself.


Are Smashwords books unreadable? That might be putting it a little too strongly. It's not as if they have incorrect line feeds in the middle of sentences or lose all their italics or anything like that. I just find them very cramped and given that I'm side loading them onto my kindle through Calibre anyway, it's far preferable to me to add the 15 seconds it takes to have it make them more to my liking. I've done the same with a lot of trade published books as well.

Perhaps I was exaggerating when I wrote "unreadable". A book's typesetting doesn't have to go too far out-of-whack before readers will have problems with it: readers will feel uncomfortable with the text and will set the book aside if it doesn't read easily, even if it doesn't contain obvious errors or problems. And this takes us back to my original point:


This seems to me yet another example of people trying to cut corners when self publishing, and assuming that experience and expertise can be replaced by cheap or free software.

If you don't realise how badly even slightly poor typesetting or formatting affects the reading experience, then you don't understand how these problems are losing you readers even without the issue with the iBooks store.

Bulletproof
01-12-2013, 11:57 PM
FWIW for those trying to actually fix issues with the sample being given away. I uploaded epubs to Smashwords on the 1st and sent a note to Smashwords customer service that they request Apple to refresh the files. Smash said this was done a few days ago, but Apple hasn't actually replaced the files. Whether that's a miscommunication between Apple and Smash or that Apple is just plain not going to do it only time will tell. That was what finally led me to look at the new provider despite their lack of a long term track record.

I am selling more and more on Apple, which is kind of amazing given that payment is defacto optional. I'll be interested to see what happens when I have everything switched over.
Thanks for the update. How long did it take SW to get back to you? I'm at 24 hours with no response.

As of yesterday, half of your catalog had the correct sample length. Is this because of something you did last year, or did some of your books never have problems?

Are the sales higher for the books that aren't free?

Sorry for all the questions. The whole thing is incredibly frustrating. I can't understand why this has been going on for months but so few people know about it.

Bulletproof
01-13-2013, 12:33 AM
If you don't realise how badly even slightly poor typesetting or formatting affects the reading experience, then you don't understand how these problems are losing you readers even without the issue with the iBooks store.
I sincerely doubt formatting costs me readers, but I self-pub in a very forgiving genre. :)

Many ebooks have problems big and small, but I really don't sense that mine are in that category. But I would be the last to know, wouldn't I?

There are plenty of discussions of what makes a good/bad cover or why something is poorly edited, so maybe someone took a sample from a successful Scrivener epub or mobi and then explained, via red circles, why it's wrong/bad/off? I tried Google but didn't find anything. It wouldn't be hard, actually...just type up a page, export it properly, then show the same excerpt as formatted by the publisher and explain why the second is better. Of course the e-reader would have to match the fonts and sizes, but that's easy enough.

Medievalist
01-13-2013, 12:37 AM
I sincerely doubt formatting costs me readers, but I self-pub in a very forgiving genre. :)

Many ebooks have problems big and small, but I really don't sense that mine are in that category. But I would be the last to know, wouldn't I?

The professional thing to do is to ask readers to check your ebooks on several platforms, rather than rely on previews.

Ask them to check how the book appears, if they see any odd breaks, or font changes, or missing text, and ask them to use the TOC, as a start.

You can give them a copy of the ebook, and thank them in the acknowledgements.

Ebooks are half way to being software; it makes sense to beta test and do QA.

eqb
01-13-2013, 01:04 AM
Ebooks are half way to being software; it makes sense to beta test and do QA.

This.

I check my self-pubbed e-books on my Nook. I ask my friends to check them on Kindle and other readers.

Old Hack
01-13-2013, 01:26 AM
I sincerely doubt formatting costs me readers, but I self-pub in a very forgiving genre. :)

A couple of years ago I was speaking to a typesetter about how poor typesetting puts readers off, and she ended up writing an article for my blog about it. You can read it here (http://howpublishingreallyworks.com/?p=2746).

Readers pick up a book, look at the first paragraph or two, and decide wether or not to buy it. It's not a decision which is made purely because of the quality of the writing or the cleverness of the story: all sorts of things come into play including how well the book is typeset or, in the case of e-books, formatted.

Readers might well be put off a book because of its poor formatting, but not know why they're not so keen on it. They'll be unlikely to buy your next book, though, because they'll remember there was something they didn't like about your previous one.


Many ebooks have problems big and small, but I really don't sense that mine are in that category. But I would be the last to know, wouldn't I?

Look at the self published books I've reviewed (see the link in my signature). Almost all the writers who send me their books to review tell me that they're confident I won't find any problems with their books. Almost all of them are wrong.


There are plenty of discussions of what makes a good/bad cover or why something is poorly edited, so maybe someone took a sample from a successful Scrivener epub or mobi and then explained, via red circles, why it's wrong/bad/off? I tried Google but didn't find anything. It wouldn't be hard, actually...just type up a page, export it properly, then show the same excerpt as formatted by the publisher and explain why the second is better. Of course the e-reader would have to match the fonts and sizes, but that's easy enough.

That stuff has already been discussed in the threads I linked to upstream. You might like to read them.

Katie Elle
01-13-2013, 01:56 AM
Thanks for the update. How long did it take SW to get back to you? I'm at 24 hours with no response.

It was a couple of weeks and that was almost a month ago and nothing was ever fixed.


As of yesterday, half of your catalog had the correct sample length. Is this because of something you did last year, or did some of your books never have problems?

The ones with correct samples were all prior to I think it was July? Something changed. I've looked at the Smash epubs casually in Sigil and I don't see any difference in the code, so I'm guessing it was on Apple's side and how they take an excerpt. Not that Smashwords is blameless as they should have caught this and if not, should have fixed it after it was pointed out. It is, after all, what we're paying them 10% for.

I have one title through D2D live on ibooks under another name. It was done in Word/Calibre using the method I posted here and the formatting is exactly what I wanted. It even preserved the two tier nested NCX TOC. D2D had it live in a day. Apple hand checks all erotica, so nothing else is live, but I have ones in the pipeline on both Smash and D2D that were uploaded as epubs directly, some formatted in Word/Calibre and others in Scrivener. We'll see.

I really hate to get onto Smashwords. I'm infinitely grateful for all that Mark Coker has done for us, particularly in terms of PayPal censorship last March. It just reached a point where the service had gone downhill too far.

MaggieDana
01-13-2013, 03:45 AM
A couple of years ago I was speaking to a typesetter about how poor typesetting puts readers off, and she ended up writing an article for my blog about it. You can read it here (http://howpublishingreallyworks.com/?p=2746).

Readers pick up a book, look at the first paragraph or two, and decide wether or not to buy it. It's not a decision which is made purely because of the quality of the writing or the cleverness of the story: all sorts of things come into play including how well the book is typeset or, in the case of e-books, formatted.

Readers might well be put off a book because of its poor formatting, but not know why they're not so keen on it. They'll be unlikely to buy your next book, though, because they'll remember there was something they didn't like about your previous one.


I'm chiming in here as the typesetter Old Hack refers to in her first paragraph. Since writing that article for Old Hack's blog (which is hugely fabulous, by the way), I've also learned to format ebooks. In some ways, having a book design/typesetting background was helpful in this endeavor; in others, it wasn't. Given the terminology HTML programmers use that is often at odds with what a typesetter would use, I've often had to leave my book design hat at the door before delving into the mysteries of ebook formatting, HTML, and CSS.

Margins, for instance. They mean a totally different thing to a print book designer than to someone who writes/reads HTML and CSS. The term 'leading' (a print-book standby) is not used in HTML. Indents are handled differently, as are myriad other standards that print designers have used for years (centuries, even). We've all had to learn new tricks.

AND I LOVE IT!

All I can add to this conversation is that it takes a lot of reading and listening to experts in order to learn the nuances, intricacies, and often confusing pathways of e-book formatting. As I mentioned, I'm a book designer and typesetter (I'm also a women's fiction and children's author). I've been involved in the world of print for 30+ years, yet I spent six months last year reading/learning/listening before I uploaded my first DIY books to Amazon, B&N, Kobo, and iTunes. They went up first time without a problem, but that wasn't due to my typesetting experience.

It was because I learned, then learned some more.

merrihiatt
01-13-2013, 03:47 AM
If formatting is the problem, why are my titles not having the same issue with the sample showing 100% of the book? I upload MS Word documents to Smashwords. Is it hit and miss? It would seem like the issue should be universal for all Smashwords titles that have gone through the meat grinder. Not that I want this issue, but it does make me curious.

Katie Elle
01-13-2013, 07:33 AM
If formatting is the problem, why are my titles not having the same issue with the sample showing 100% of the book? I upload MS Word documents to Smashwords. Is it hit and miss? It would seem like the issue should be universal for all Smashwords titles that have gone through the meat grinder. Not that I want this issue, but it does make me curious.

My guess is that it's something TOC related. I looked at "Santa Hates" and even for a relatively short piece, it has several chapters and peeking at the sample on an ipad, it seems to end at the conclusion of a chapter. That would match with Smashwords unhelpful answer to me where they hinted that adding more options to the TOC might be helpful.

Hopefully when some of the epubs people are uploading go through, it'll give us more answers.

merrihiatt
01-13-2013, 08:06 AM
Table of contents, ah, that may be part of the answer. I don't use TOCs in my novels or short stories, Smashwords' meat grinder inserts them.

ETA: I checked Santa Hates Seattle and was only able to read the first chapter, which is about right for the sample. IIRC, this short story has around fifteen chapters.

J. Tanner
01-13-2013, 09:42 AM
My guess is that it's something TOC related. I looked at "Santa Hates" and even for a relatively short piece, it has several chapters and peeking at the sample on an ipad, it seems to end at the conclusion of a chapter. That would match with Smashwords unhelpful answer to me where they hinted that adding more options to the TOC might be helpful.


I have short stories up with no predefined chapters. I checked them yesterday after seeing this thread and they're all sampling properly. Tis a mystery...

aibrean
01-14-2013, 05:18 AM
I looked at mine and it was only showing 4 out of 40 chapters in the sample. I uploaded a Word doc with headings using the Heading 1 style in word and the rest normal. My TOC is generated by Smashwords give the Heading 1 style. For Kindle (direct through Amazon) I have to manually make the TOC.