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LloydBrown
01-28-2006, 12:48 AM
I recently read Stephen King's On Writing, and it reinspired my dedication to reading. I've cut TV back to about 5 hours a week (I watch Wheel of Fortune & Jeopardy with my wife, and ER when it's new), and it's making a big difference.

So, then I read Michael Crichton's The Andromeda Strain on the 21st (in about 4 1/2 hours).
Then John Grisham's The Summons.
I read 28 chapters of a friend's unpublished ms (about 65,000 words).
I read Michael Stackpole's I, Jedi between the 24th & 25th.
Now I'm reading George Martin's A Clash of Kings. It's going to take a few days because it's a monster.
Then Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. That should take an afternoon.

Then I go back to the library.

It's a good time.

Shadow_Ferret
01-28-2006, 12:57 AM
TV isn't my problem.

My kids are.

You want 'em?

Noob
01-28-2006, 01:07 AM
TV isn't my problem.

My kids are.

You want 'em?

he he. Good one :)

LloydBrown
02-14-2006, 08:37 AM
To Kill a Mockingbird is done.

So is Martin's A Clash of Kings, which was a 1,000-page beast.
At the library tonight, I picked up Last of the Mohicans, Lord of the Flies, and Beowolf's Children, sequel to Legacy of Heorot, one of the best sci-fi pieces from the last 40 years, IMHO.

I have questions about TKAM, but they have to wait until morning.

Shadow_Ferret
02-14-2006, 08:52 AM
Beowolf's Children? Is it written in unrhymed, four-beat alliterative metre of Old English poetry too?

kristie911
02-14-2006, 09:57 AM
I'm in the middle of Stephen King's new novel, Cell. Awesome so far...

Then it's on to Patterson's, The 5th Horsemen and Iris Johansen's, On The Run.

After that, well, who knows?

WerenCole
02-14-2006, 10:16 AM
I'm in the middle of Stephen King's new novel, Cell. Awesome so far...

Then it's on to Patterson's, The 5th Horsemen and Iris Johansen's, On The Run.

After that, well, who knows?


King's new novel was pre-ordered for me during Christmas, but was sent to my parents house. . . I just need to drive a hundred miles to go get it.

Anyway, I am doing a research project on cynicism in the later years of Mark Twain's life, so I am up to my ears in Twain research. . . I would suggest Letter's From The Earth. . . . hilarious blasphemy, if you believe in that blasphemy stuff. . . or maybe try picking up The Mysterious Stranger and other short works. . . Twain was very biting in his later years.

BlackCrowesChick
02-14-2006, 11:13 AM
I'm in the middle of Stephen King's new novel, Cell. Awesome so far...



I'm reading Cell, too. I'm almost finished with it. I like it, too.

travNastee
02-15-2006, 09:43 AM
I finished Cell last night (after not reading it other than 35 pages the day I bought it.)

Let me know when y'all finish because I have some stuff that I really need to rant about over it and they are technically spoilers. I enjoyed it quite a bit, but...

Right now, though I've picked up Company by Max Barry. I'm about 50 into it, and it's pretty good so far.

I'm going to go back and re-read White Noise after that, and I might pick up Tyrannosaur Canyon.

Nicholson James
02-15-2006, 09:51 AM
I finished Dave Eggers's A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius two nights ago. It's one helluva manic-depressive read, but I'd recommend it to anyone.

So now I'm about halfway through Dennis Lehane's A Drink Before the War. This man is rapidly becoming my favorite author.

(And King's On Writing is an amazing little friend.)

kristie911
02-15-2006, 10:37 AM
I finished Cell last night (after not reading it other than 35 pages the day I bought it.)

Let me know when y'all finish because I have some stuff that I really need to rant about over it and they are technically spoilers. I enjoyed it quite a bit, but...

I finished Cell tonight and loved it! I'd love to know what you didn't like about it but we'd better not spoil it for everyone...

blisswriter
02-15-2006, 12:20 PM
I'm still reading Bless Me Ultima. I was reading Foundation (but got stuck at the last few pages) and bell hooks' all about love (but put it down because I couldn't concentrate on it at the time).

I've gotten a bunch of new books from the Re-Store (Habitat for Humanity's "thrift" store) and I hope to break one open soon.

A few asides:

Does anyone else here shop at the Re-Store? We've been a few times since we moved to Carolina and I really like it. The down side is that it's across town and will be even further away when we move next month.

Also, is there anyone else here who never minds spoilers? I always like to hear the details, especially for movies. I feel like seeing it isn't the same as hearing it and seeing it on the screen always differs wildly from what I imagine from hearing it.

With books, spoilers are okay for me because if I plan to read it any way, the experience of reading it for myself is totally different from how I relate to it being told to me by someone else. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/EmoteShrug.gif

Maryn
02-15-2006, 05:25 PM
I'm like you, Blisswriter, in two ways--spoilers can ruin movies for me, but not books, plus I shop thrift stores (although we don't have a Re-Store) frequently. It helps that my critique group's daytime meetings are near the best one.

But I understand that for some people, any and all spoilers ruin the experience, so I try hard not to mess it up for them by labeling my messages that give away important plot elements.

It's a rare book that's truly ruined by a spoiler (Shutter Island comes to mind), but obviously that's just me--and you.

Maryn, who reads less when she writes more

robeiae
02-15-2006, 06:22 PM
and Beowolf's Children, sequel to Legacy of Heorot, one of the best sci-fi pieces from the last 40 years, IMHO.
I didn't like Beowolf's Children at all, though I thought Legacy was pretty good.

Rob :)

Jaycinth
02-15-2006, 06:44 PM
I'm working on two Ben Bova books now. I plan to grab the new King book, but after that....anybody want to give me suggestions? Horror, Sci-fi and Fantasy are my Holy Grails.

LloydBrown
02-15-2006, 07:13 PM
I didn't like Beowolf's Children at all, though I thought Legacy was pretty good.

I'm not liking the generational conflict. I'm about 232 pages in so far. The characterization is almost as good as Legacy, but the tension is far less intense...so far not as good as Legacy.

I think I'm going to start a new thread for my discussion on TKAMB.

LloydBrown
02-17-2006, 09:44 PM
Beowulf's Children is done. Eh.

Lord of the Flies next.

robeiae
02-17-2006, 11:46 PM
Have you read "The Mote in God's Eye"?

Rob :)

LloydBrown
02-17-2006, 11:50 PM
Have you read "The Mote in God's Eye"?

Nope.

I'd give these guys another chance, although I was disappointed with Beowulf's Children. I saw a lot that I liked. Unfortunately, the storyline wasn't it. Ouch!

Sarita
02-17-2006, 11:51 PM
Lloyd: I just finished On Writing for the second time. It's a great read, isn't it? It really made me start writing down my ideas for short stories and future projects, now if I would only finish what I have going so I could get to some of them!

Now, I'm reading The Pacific Between, by Ray Wong. So far, so good :)

special needs
02-17-2006, 11:53 PM
I just read "Go Ask Alice" again. I read it in 3rd grade during math class, and never understood it...I can only hope that my dad had no idea that it's not all-that-appropriate-for-a-seven-year-old....

robeiae
02-18-2006, 01:13 AM
Nope.

I'd give these guys another chance, although I was disappointed with Beowulf's Children. I saw a lot that I liked. Unfortunately, the storyline wasn't it. Ouch!
Leagacy/Beowulf is Niven, Pournelle and Barnes.

Mote is just Niven and Pournelle. It leaves Legact in the dust, IMO.

Rob :)

LloydBrown
02-27-2006, 05:07 AM
Add Lord of the Flies to the list. Finished it today. I started Last of the Mohicans today, and it's typically long-winded for the period.

LloydBrown
04-04-2006, 06:34 PM
Over a month to read Last of the Mohicans. Ugh. Or Hugh! as Cooper says.

I'm rewarding myself with Frankenstein and then Michael Crichton's Timeline. Frankenstein is short--about 60,000 words, I think, and Shelley's easy reading compared to Cooper.

LloydBrown
04-09-2006, 04:13 AM
Done with Frankenstein. 90 minutes later, I'm done with Call of the Wild. That was a blast! Next!

LloydBrown
04-10-2006, 12:11 AM
Done with Michael Crichton's Timeline. Time to go to the library again.

LloydBrown
04-13-2006, 12:41 AM
Michael Crichton's Prey today.

I wish libraries had more books. I struck out on a half-dozen titles this weekend.

DamaNegra
04-13-2006, 12:47 AM
I wish I had more money to buy books

LloydBrown
04-13-2006, 01:14 AM
I wish I had more money to buy books

My new house is about a mile from a library.

LloydBrown
05-06-2006, 07:32 PM
Dan Brown's Angels and Demons done.

maestrowork
05-06-2006, 07:35 PM
Lloyd, sounds like you really like best-selling thrillers... :) Maybe borrow Sense and Sensibility next time. LOL.

(I liked A&D, but hated Timeline)

LloydBrown
05-06-2006, 07:44 PM
Lloyd, sounds like you really like best-selling thrillers... :) Maybe borrow Sense and Sensibility next time. LOL.

I'm trying to mix the classical stuff with the current stuff, but I've been limited to what I can find in the library. I head in with a list, usually 3-4 from "column A" (the classics) and an equal number from column B (fun reads). I'm hitting below 50% on my list.

Maybe when school's out, I'll be able to find more from column A in stock at the library.

I am currently reading Treasure Island, and I have Heart of Darkness after that.

SC Harrison
05-06-2006, 08:42 PM
Leagacy/Beowulf is Niven, Pournelle and Barnes.

Mote is just Niven and Pournelle. It leaves Legact in the dust, IMO.

Rob :)

If you haven't yet, read The Gripping Hand and Footfall. Niven is one of my favorite writers, but I do prefer his older stuff. Reading about a future where your organs can be harvested for the offense of jaywalking has actually made me less likely to walk across on the red. Some sort of subliminal suggestion I think.

LloydBrown
09-03-2006, 12:59 AM
Finished King's Nightmares & Dreamscapes, Dan Simmons' The Fall of Hyperion and Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.

I'll start a thread to discuss Gatsby.

Back to the library today.

Here's my list I'm taking with me:

A Clash of Swords George Martin
Catcher in the Rye J. D. Salinger
Double Indemnity James. M. Cain
Heart of Darkness Joseph Conrad
Holes Louis Sachar
Little House on the Prairie Laura Ingalls Wilder
Lonesome Dove Larry McMurtry
The Destroyer series Warren Murphy
begin with “Created, the Destroyer”
Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events Daniel Hanlder
Shane Jack Schaefer
The Red Badge of Courage Stephen Crane
The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck
The Origin of Species Charles Darwin
The Postman Always Rings Twice James. M. Cain
A Song of Kali Dan Simmons
Conan short stories Robert Howard
Slaughterhouse Five Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.
The Sun Also Rises Ernest Hemingway
HP & the Order of the Phoenix J. K. Rowling

Shadow_Ferret
09-03-2006, 01:40 AM
I wish libraries had more books. I struck out on a half-dozen titles this weekend.

Our library has a website that you can go to and see if the books are carried and if they are checked in or not. That way I don't waste time running over if they don't have what I want.

LloydBrown
09-03-2006, 01:54 AM
Our library has a website that you can go to and see if the books are carried and if they are checked in or not. That way I don't waste time running over if they don't have what I want.

That works until people steal the books, which happens. Fortunately, the library is in my path to go virtually anywhere, and I drive right by it many times each week.

LloydBrown
09-03-2006, 03:35 AM
I live in a tiny town in the middle of nowhere. The library is tiny, too. Thankfully we have inter-library loan.

We do. My sister makes extensive use of it. I'm going to start using it. Now I just have to deal with the fact that they close so early: 6 PM most days.

persiphone_hellecat
09-03-2006, 05:09 AM
King's new novel was pre-ordered for me during Christmas, but was sent to my parents house. . . I just need to drive a hundred miles to go get it.

Anyway, I am doing a research project on cynicism in the later years of Mark Twain's life, so I am up to my ears in Twain research. . . I would suggest Letter's From The Earth. . . . hilarious blasphemy, if you believe in that blasphemy stuff. . . or maybe try picking up The Mysterious Stranger and other short works. . . Twain was very biting in his later years.

Having once assisted the dept chair in writing a 19c American Lit curric. I would recommend a couple Twain pieces - The Story of the Good Little Boy and the Story of the Bad Little Boy (both easily Googled for complete texts) and The Diary of Adam and Eve ..

I read pretty much everything - read Cell a couple months ago - but my favorite is Hawthorne -- I particularly love his Scientific Romance stories from his Twice Told Tales etc. The American Romance movement is very different from the European ... Rappuccini's Daughter is wonderful but I suppose my favorite is The Artist of the Beautiful - most Hawthorne stories can also be found online ... and Young Goodman Brown is about as fine a story as you will ever read .... Then don't miss The Scarlet Letter and 7 Gables and work your way up to the Marble Faun ... I seriously advise anyone who loves reading to spend a good chunk of time with Hawthorne - you wont regret it.

Soccer Mom
09-03-2006, 08:36 AM
For a break, a little humourous but insightful non-fiction can be the ticket. Have you read any Bill Bryson? I have to reread "A Walk in the Woods" everytime we take a hiking trip. It's peeyourpants funny.

Aubiefan
09-03-2006, 08:43 AM
I read On Writing a couple of weeks ago, and plan on rereading it again in the future, really great book. I'd recommend reading it before King's The Dark Half, I think you pick up on more things in the latter if you've read On Writing first.

Last week I read The Dante Club by Michael Pearl, his style wasn't exactly the type I prefer but the book was extremely good. It revolves around a series of murders patterned after different scenes in Dante's Inferno. You don't have to have read Dante in order to enjoy this book, but I'd recommend it, there is a lot of literary analysis within the novel and it's very interesting.

I just finished Second Genesis by Jeffrey Anderson, it started off great and the story concept really fascinated me, but ultimately I was disappointed, I won't be buying one of his books again, his style just didn't pull me in.

Right now I'm reading The Island of the Colorblind by Oliver Sacks, very fascinating!

deacon
09-03-2006, 09:11 AM
i'm halfway through "the little engine that could"
i don't get it.

LloydBrown
09-10-2006, 08:50 PM
I read the Old Man and the Sea this morning. I often look at reading these classics as a chore. I never know if it's going to be something I enjoy, or something that I have to trudge through.

By page two, I was hooked.

I cannot tell you for certain what did it. Part of it was the ease of reading. You can almost "accidentally" read through The Old Man and the Sea because it's so short and written so simply. Pick it up to browse for a couple of minutes, and before you know it--you're done.

Part of it was the old man and his relationship with the boy. The boy clearly worshipped the old man, and that made me like the old man, too.

Good stuff. Now to finish Heart of Darkness and add more Hemingway to my list. I really liked this one.

Aubiefan
09-11-2006, 01:30 AM
I read Everything's Eventual by Stephen King earlier this week, and now I'm working on Wild Health: How Animals Keep Themselves Well and What We Can Learn From Them by Cindy Engel. That is an extremely fascinating book (or it could just be the biased perspective of a zoology major), it's about how animals consume specific plants/food/nonfood items in response to illness, parasites, deficiencies, etc. There are a lot of aspects of the issue that are examined, everything from drunkeness to clay-eating, very interesting!

TsukiRyoko
09-11-2006, 02:25 AM
Tv can cause me to procrastinate sometimes, but that's when I turn on something either terrifyingly ridiculous or just plain boring. After a few minutes of the TV show, I ask myself "What's more interesting, watching this piece of &#%$, or creating my own little world?" That's usually more than enough motivation to get my lazy butt out of the couch and up to the to computer chair.

As for the reading, you're making a lot of progress! Good job, reading is always good. I've lost many babysitting jobs over it though. I read to the children, the parents say things like "A brutal crime mystery is hardly appropriate for a 5 year old!", it's bad.... :D

LloydBrown
09-11-2006, 03:25 AM
Okay, Heart of Darkness is done. It'll be back to the library tomorrow.

I thoroughly love Conrad's descriptive ability. His use of language is exceptional, and his ability to characterize Kurtz largely through the reactions of other characters is outstanding. Kurtz is "on stage" for barely a couple of pages, but his presence illuminates most of the book.

LloydBrown
09-18-2006, 05:59 PM
A Farewell to Arms is done.

Uh, that was strange. I didn't get a lot of the dialogue, and I've read fiction from a wide range of time frames.

And man, there was a lot of alcohol in that book!

ggglimpopo
09-18-2006, 10:34 PM
Suite Francais is some of the most lyrical writing I have read in a long time. I would kill to be able to write like that. Am about to start Frankenstein.

persiphone_hellecat
09-18-2006, 11:16 PM
Yesterday, I read Aftermath, the story of the tearing down of the World Trade Center - an incredibly powerful and amazing book. It focused on the positive and on the people at the site rather than on the negative ... It was extremely moving and today I intend to write to the author.

henriette
09-19-2006, 12:12 AM
just recently re-read "washington square" by henry james. great book and clear, effective writing. definitely for those who prefer character studies to 'action'.