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buz
10-22-2012, 06:05 AM
As someone in a, shall we say, "transitional" period, work-wise...I'm curious. How'd you get to where you are? Careful planning? Happy accident? (Unhappy accident?) Knew what you wanted to do since you were three? Still have no clue and took whatever seemed like a good enough idea at the time?

My brain is stuck and running into walls. It could do with some smacking loose... Tell me stories? (Vague ones, if you're uncomfortable being specific...:D )

PrincessofPersia
10-22-2012, 06:12 AM
I signed on the dotted line, and they threw me on a plane to Great Mistakes. Didn't really have a choice after that, but I wouldn't have changed my mind anyway.

As for motivation, I was just really looking for something I could make a career of while getting to do something at least vaguely important. I didn't want to just diddle away doing nothing of consequence my whole life. Massive piles of student debt provided the extra motivation I needed to get my ass in gear and do it.

Sydneyd
10-22-2012, 06:17 AM
I'm really hoping someone here is a ditch digger so they can say, "I fell into it."


:D

PrincessofPersia
10-22-2012, 07:37 AM
I'm really hoping someone here is a ditch digger so they can say, "I fell into it."


:D

Ha!

Oh, wait! I'm a sailor. I went to the recruiting office, and they "roped me in."

Huh? Huh? 'Cause we tie knots and play with lines and ropes.

Okay, I'll go away now...

Sydneyd
10-22-2012, 08:27 PM
Ha!

Oh, wait! I'm a sailor. I went to the recruiting office, and they "roped me in."

Huh? Huh? 'Cause we tie knots and play with lines and ropes.

Okay, I'll go away now...

:roll:

buz
10-22-2012, 09:38 PM
Or it could be a thread of horrible wordplay instead :D :D

Myself, I was saddled with mine...:P (horses. hurr hurr hurr)

BeatrixKiddo
10-23-2012, 12:42 AM
I actually ended up in my job through a temp agency and after a few months, the company wanted me to be permanent. Been there ever since...15 years now.

copperbeeches
10-23-2012, 01:41 AM
No one successfully talked me out of it. :(

mccardey
10-23-2012, 01:42 AM
How did you end up in your line of work?

Sloth.

Specval
10-23-2012, 01:59 AM
Well I did all the "right" things. I went to college, then went to law school, graduated, rocked the Bar exam in 2 states.

At this point you're probably assuming, "Oh, she's a lawyer. She's doing what she always dreamed of." Nope! I'm a real estate agent. Couldn't find anyone willing to pay me more than $30k a year to be a lawyer, (in Mass that's ridiculously low) so I got my RE license and made more than $30k in my first year. TAKE THAT CHEAP EMPLOYERS!!

So, I guess I just kind of fell into it. Turns out I love doing it.

I've relocated and I'm just finishing up a couple pending RE deals. Since the market is very scary here, I have to take another bar exam and hope I can find a job in a field that has only gotten more and more saturated by qualified employees.

Oh, and I'm slowly coming to the conclusion that I just want to write and edit when I grow up. HA!

(Yes, I'm very jaded about the whole situation. But good luck!!)

asroc
10-23-2012, 02:15 AM
Happy accident, sort of.

I took an EMT-B class in high school and got to ride with our local ambulance company. When I was graduating from my rigorous high school I started having serious doubts about going on to my rigorous college. Right around that time my supervisor told me that the service wanted to train some new paramedics and whether I was interested.
So I deferred admission for a year, learned a profession I love and went to college a year later with my batteries recharged. It made for a great part-time job during college and a great full-time job after.

I was planning to go to medical school after college, but life kept getting in the way. Now my husband has to finish his degree first. But I have a good feeling about next year.

(The happy accident was the timing. Today there's a gigantic waitlist for paramedic training and my service is hardly ever hiring anymore. Hey, "accident" totally works! Get it? Accident? 'Cause I'm a medic? Oh, I kill me...)

copperbeeches
10-23-2012, 03:40 AM
(Yes, I'm very jaded about the whole situation. But good luck!!)

I hear you on the law thing (I'm in a very similar situation right now, actually--passed the bar in two states, woefully underemployed).

Al Stevens
10-23-2012, 03:42 AM
I didn't read music well enough to get into the band, so they turned me into a spook.

French Maiden
10-23-2012, 04:02 AM
The condom broke :-/

Specval
10-23-2012, 04:09 AM
I hear you on the law thing (I'm in a very similar situation right now, actually--passed the bar in two states, woefully underemployed).

Sad as it is, I'm happy to know I'm not alone. And congrats on passing the Bars!!

If one more person asks, "So when are you going to get a law job? I hate to see you waste all that time in school." I might have a complete melt down.

copperbeeches
10-23-2012, 04:14 AM
Thanks, you too. :) And you're certainly not. Many of my classmates are in the same position--for example, a friend of mine had a clerkship for a year in another state and now she's finding it nearly impossible to get a job in the city.

I've been working for a year, although not full time, and I always feel weird/sad when people ask me about it. There's a small chance I might be able to get an interview at a "dream job" but I'm not holding my breath. The market is just soooo bad.

Snitchcat
10-23-2012, 08:30 AM
Sold and promoted my way into my previous positions (marketing in tech companies). Wrote my way into my current position (tech writer with a consumer behaviour perspective gained from years in marketing).

seun
10-23-2012, 12:28 PM
I was working for a small ad company, earning roughly bugger all, when I heard about a couple of jobs in my local library. I applied for both and got one of the roles.

Eight years later, I'm still here. It's a decent job; I don't take any work home or have to deal with the public (hurray) and it leaves me free to write. Double hurray.

fireluxlou
10-23-2012, 12:41 PM
Umm I don't know never planned to go into shop work really. It's more of a surprise I left the interview with a job, than it is than a want to work in shop. *shrugs* I am doing a part time degree alongside it because I like working towards a goal but I'm not very ambitious. I don't know most of my family are in working class jobs supermarkets, retail, farming, cleaning etc so I suppose a natural path maybe. I wasn't really bright at school so never really planned a career outside 'I want to be writer'. It will materialize one day.

seun
10-23-2012, 12:43 PM
I wasn't really bright at school so never really planned a career outside 'I want to be writer'.

Same here. I had no academic goals or plans. Writing was what I wanted to do. Seemed pretty straightforward to me.

fireluxlou
10-23-2012, 12:48 PM
Same here. I had no academic goals or plans. Writing was what I wanted to do. Seemed pretty straightforward to me.

Me too. I did art for awhile because I wanted to be an artist, but I grew out of love with it. Wanting to be a writer has always been there. When I look at my friends salaries I sometimes wish I was more career orientated and more intelligent in Science and other subejcts like they are! XD

KellyAssauer
10-23-2012, 02:19 PM
After being picked-on and ostracized all those impressionable years of grade school, Jr & Sr High, I became convinced that society at large just didn't want me around, so I naturally gravitated to an occupation that allowed me as little as possible contact with people.

buz
10-23-2012, 03:18 PM
If one more person asks, "So when are you going to get a law job? I hate to see you waste all that time in school." I might have a complete melt down.

Yeah...half of the people I know don't actually use their degrees, so much. (I'm one of them.) I've had friends who majored in English and political science and psychology go on to become fitness instructors, bakers, ministers, professional horse riders, dog trainers...

I get annoyed when people ask me what I'm going to do with my life, too, unfortunately...just because I ask the question of myself constantly, and the answer never changes. ;) I irritate myself.

Your answers are all really interesting :D Thank you guys for sharing!

Mr Flibble
10-23-2012, 03:42 PM
I needed a part time job and it was available. The happy accident is, the shop is at the end of my road (less than 2 minute's walk). The unhappy accident is I have no excuse to not go in when there's lots of snow and everyone else is 'snowbound'.

I_love_coffee
10-23-2012, 06:42 PM
I do not advise you do this: ( btw, this was back in the 90's) In undergrad I read all the course descriptions and decided that the Sociology classes looked the most interesting. This degree prepared me to have intelligent discussions in bars, so then I went to grad school to get my Masters in Social Work.

Upon graduating the pay was so woefully low for most positions that I could have continued on with my current career as a waitress and made more money. I am not a materialistic person but I do like to pay rent and eat etc. I discovered that hospital social work paid the best so I "lucked out" and got a job in a hospital, was there for 8 years, moved, got a new job as a social worker in a nursing home for children (been here 10 years). I am feeling burnt out, but I love the children here and in this economy glad to have a decent job (though not my passion)..... so i take my lunch in my car and work on my novel.....


so, Buzhidao, what is your background, what are your interests, maybe we can help you brainstorm.....

KawaiiTimes
10-24-2012, 09:21 AM
I had difficulty following other people's directions, but I did such a good job of it that I got a management position where I excelled and was worked to death. Then DH had mentioned he'd like to own a business someday so I convinced him to open a shop, and I quit my job so that I could be free to boss him around.

Cliff Face
10-24-2012, 11:36 AM
When I get a job I like, I'll tell you.

Seriously, haven't enjoyed any of the jobs I've had, so I'm back at Uni now to try to open up some more doors for myself.

Something thinky would be good... Unqualified positions generally don't require enough thinking for my tastes.

buz
10-24-2012, 05:19 PM
I like the variety of answers :D It's cool to see. (I also like that, for a lot of people, the first job is sort of a miss--is that bad of me...;) )



so, Buzhidao, what is your background, what are your interests, maybe we can help you brainstorm.....

Very sweet of you to ask. :D I'm not sure how to answer that without babbling endlessly...

I will say that I have ideas. But that's all I ever have, lots and lots of ideas...:P

I'm very good at seeing closed doors instead of windows to crawl into. I'm also kinda gun-shy. I've already done the thing where you throw tons of time and money and effort into studying something and then change your mind before you've really begun, and I feel like I kinda screwed myself doing that. I'm scared of doing it again--and I want to be sure this time--but sure is impossible, know what I mean? ;)

It helps to remind myself that other people do this all the time, in a variety of ways. It's not insurmountable. I just see it that way :D

quickWit
10-24-2012, 05:30 PM
*looks at buz's avvie*
Have you considered a rewarding career in either the dental or optical industries?

Cella
10-24-2012, 06:08 PM
I've done a bunch of stuff but most of it has revolved around retail sales. I've grown weary of that after 14+ years so I'm back in school to earn a degree that will hopefully open some new doors.

buz
10-25-2012, 06:37 AM
*looks at buz's avvie*
Have you considered a rewarding career in either the dental or optical industries?

You mean I should lean in really close to people's faces for a living and stare at them intently? :D

I can hear the children screaming now...and the men withering...

quickWit
10-25-2012, 04:49 PM
You mean I should lean in really close to people's faces for a living and stare at them intently? :D

I can hear the children screaming now...and the men withering...

Add bad breath and a weak bladder and you'd be haggis. :D

Saoirse
10-25-2012, 05:05 PM
I went to school for Journalism, but this was around the same time the economy tanked. Also, Journalism is sooooo competitive, which didn't help matters. Couldn't find a job.

I had school loans to pay off, and I ended up staying at the job I got for my internship -- which turned out to be more office management than any kind of writing. Big disappointment, but it paid the bills. When I got laid off from that job, I gravitated more toward office work as that's where my experience was. And I kept getting laid off, and by some stroke of luck (or misfortune..not sure which) I saw an ad in the paper for the job I'm currently at. Foodservice marketing firm. Secretarial (and everything else, I've since discovered). Craziest business ever, crazier than crazier boss, been there almost 12 years. Been job hunting.

(I'm in the process of starting a freelance editing business so I can at least use what I learned in school, make a few bucks, and enjoy it. Yes, I enjoy editing. I am weird).

tamara
10-25-2012, 07:09 PM
The short version: My degrees are in journalism and history, with a smattering of science. I worked as a journalist for a few years, did random other jobs between each of several reporting jobs, got recruited into marketing for a tech company, where I met my husband, then quit in a huff after they laid him off and treated him like crap. I freelanced in public relations for a few more years, sold that practice, and used the money to start an IT company with DH (6 years ago). So now I'm splitting my time between company financial management and HR (which I'm learning as I go), writing, and being primary caregiver for our school-aged kids.

Here's my life lesson: All of your academic, professional, and life experience can coalesce into something that makes sense, and you never know what direction it'll take you. Every job I've had since college has used the skills and resume-building benefits of weird academic and professional experiences that at the time seemed like time-wasting tangents. When I was unemployed and desperate, I applied for a job as a database manager at a scientific supply company that, on paper, wasn't an obvious choice for me. I got it because I'd had coursework in science and writing. Everyone else who applied was a straight technology person. The work gave me knowledge about databases and technology, which allowed me to take advantage of the next opportunity that came along--tech journalist for a local newspaper.

Be wide open, and keep everything on the table. Don't look for a specific job; look at all the jobs and think about whether they could benefit from your experience.

Best of luck to you!

Saoirse
10-26-2012, 06:53 AM
Thanks, tamara, for sharing this. :D It's great to know that there are other avenues.

Gil Paul
10-26-2012, 07:12 AM
Born into it. Dad had his own business. He had me walking trade shows with him when I was only 7 or 8 years old. My first business trip to Latin America - I think I was 12. We sold or family business a couple years ago and now I am building a retail brand for another family owned company. Not my family but still a nice family.

Gil

Shadow_Ferret
10-26-2012, 07:15 AM
The recession put me here. 2 years of unemployment made my skills unmarketable so I was lucky to get the bottom feeding job I have and am now stuck in.

Paperback Writer
10-26-2012, 07:17 AM
Born into it. Dad had his own business. He had me walking trade shows with him when I was only 7 or 8 years old. My first business trip to Latin America - I think I was 12. We sold or family business a couple years ago and now I am building a retail brand for another family owned company. Not my family but still a nice family.

Gil
Nice to hear from someone from central jersey, I drive by Edison all the time.

buz
10-26-2012, 07:53 AM
Here's my life lesson: All of your academic, professional, and life experience can coalesce into something that makes sense, and you never know what direction it'll take you. Every job I've had since college has used the skills and resume-building benefits of weird academic and professional experiences that at the time seemed like time-wasting tangents. When I was unemployed and desperate, I applied for a job as a database manager at a scientific supply company that, on paper, wasn't an obvious choice for me. I got it because I'd had coursework in science and writing. Everyone else who applied was a straight technology person. The work gave me knowledge about databases and technology, which allowed me to take advantage of the next opportunity that came along--tech journalist for a local newspaper.

Be wide open, and keep everything on the table. Don't look for a specific job; look at all the jobs and think about whether they could benefit from your experience.

Best of luck to you!

Ah, cool, a life lesson :D I got far too many of the same unhelpful ones growing up and far too few really good ones...;) I like yours. :D Thank you for sharing it.

It's good to see how you made things unfold for yourself :D I feel a bit small... ;)


Originally Posted by Saoirse

Yes, I enjoy editing. I am weird.

I don't find that weird...;)

I_love_coffee
10-26-2012, 05:28 PM
[
I'm very good at seeing closed doors instead of windows to crawl into. I'm also kinda gun-shy. I've already done the thing where you throw tons of time and money and effort into studying something and then change your mind before you've really begun, and I feel like I kinda screwed myself doing that. I'm scared of doing it again--and I want to be sure this time--but sure is impossible, know what I mean? ;)

It helps to remind myself that other people do this all the time, in a variety of ways. It's not insurmountable. I just see it that way :D[/QUOTE]


Yes you are in a transitional period for sure and it is a hard place to be. You are in that state of not knowing, of being unsure, the complete unknown....Do you think that deep deep down you know what you want to do but maybe you are afraid? I mean what would you do if you knew you could not fail?

Thinking about it is good, but sometimes overthinking is bad. Sometimes you just gotta take a step in the direction you wanna go and see what happens. Maybe volunterr in the are you want to work in or take one class....

Not sure what your financial responsibilities are but once you have kids, a mortgage, etc sometimes you make decisions re: a job that you might not make otherwise. So i would advise any young person to keep their expenses as low as possible so that they are not as tied down (ever hear the term "golden handcuffs").

I know TONS of people who made mid life career changes Examples: a woman who had her master in dietetics then went on to medical school to be a dr in her late 30's, a woman in her late 40's who had a masters in health admin went to school to be a nurse. People switch up all the time.

***good luck and hugs****

swachski
10-26-2012, 06:33 PM
Great thread idea...it's interesting to see all the different careers we writers are in. :)

I've always been an artist, but I didn't want to end up a starving artist, so I got a degree in Commercial Art. (figured I could do the really fun stuff on the side). After half a dozen jobs in as many cities, I decided to go it alone and I'm now a freelance graphic designer. I work out of my home, can do practically everything online, and don't have to deal with an annoying boss ('cept myself).

buz
10-27-2012, 06:23 AM
I've tried on three different occasions now to write a thoughtful and careful and eloquent reply, but my computer keeps shutting off in the middle of it. (It does that sometimes.) So this time I'm going to write a ripsnorty haphazard reply and see how that goes :D Babbling will probably ensue...



Yes you are in a transitional period for sure and it is a hard place to be. You are in that state of not knowing, of being unsure, the complete unknown....

Yes, that's a general state of being for me :D My username means "I don't know."


Do you think that deep deep down you know what you want to do but maybe you are afraid? I mean what would you do if you knew you could not fail?

I'm afraid, but not just of failure. Failure's sort of the least of it, really. I'm afraid of being bored and unhappy. Boredom is like this horrible stupid thing that follows me and half of the things I do are attempts to smack it the fuck away. Dumb thing is, I'm naturally curious and can be interested in almost anything--it's just that, when it becomes too familiar and routine, it grates on me and I am filled with a desire to get away from it.

If I had no limitations, if money and time weren't issues, I'd change jobs every year or two and travel in between.

If I couldn't fail...it depends what you mean by fail. If you mean that I couldn't possibly not support myself, I'd probably be a novelist. :D

I don't know what I want because I want to try everything... To choose something is to take everything else off the table. ;)


Thinking about it is good, but sometimes overthinking is bad. Sometimes you just gotta take a step in the direction you wanna go and see what happens. Maybe volunterr in the are you want to work in or take one class....

My general pattern is to overthink and obsess until I'm frozen, then am forced to decide, at which point I throw up my hands and go "fuck it, I'll do whatever I think I want to do in the next three seconds."

That's how I chose my college major and that's how I chose to do the job completely unrelated to the major after I graduated. :D That's also why I keep quitting and skipping the country to learn about some other skill or whatever, to "try it out," only to still not know what the hell I'm doing, so I come back when I'm out of money and get the same job...repeat. ;) I find that this method mostly just makes me want to try even more random stuff that I have no idea how to do...

I've had some great experiences that way, but I'm getting to a point where I have this huge weight of self-loathing for not being financially independent or particularly useful. I feel like I need to stop pulling whims out of my ass and have a plan of some sort. Commit, set out on some path, prepare. But so many people don't plan, they just do--somehow...or...I dunno.

Hence, this thread. Ta-da! :D



***good luck and hugs****

Thank you :D You're too kind.




I've always been an artist, but I didn't want to end up a starving artist, so I got a degree in Commercial Art. (figured I could do the really fun stuff on the side). After half a dozen jobs in as many cities, I decided to go it alone and I'm now a freelance graphic designer. I work out of my home, can do practically everything online, and don't have to deal with an annoying boss ('cept myself).

Cool! Sounds like you've done all right for yourself :D

Thanks to everyone for replying so far :D Y'all are cool people.

Yasaibatake
10-27-2012, 07:13 AM
I'm afraid, but not just of failure. Failure's sort of the least of it, really. I'm afraid of being bored and unhappy. Boredom is like this horrible stupid thing that follows me and half of the things I do are attempts to smack it the fuck away. Dumb thing is, I'm naturally curious and can be interested in almost anything--it's just that, when it becomes too familiar and routine, it grates on me and I am filled with a desire to get away from it.

Are you me? Seriously, I'm the exact same way and it shows. I went to four different universities, declared (at various points in time) 18 different majors, and then finally graduated in the one thing I kinda liked (education) because...well, I had to pick something, didn't I? But frankly it's never been my passion, and I started debating career changes before I even started my career. Seriously, I graduated in May 2010 and by June 2010 I'd decided I should have majored in International Relations instead. Since then I've decided I'll "fix it" by getting a Masters in IR, political science, Arabic, cultural anthropology, history, French, Japanese...and finally I've very recently decided to just stop already and take the spring semester off. All I'm doing at this point is throwing good money after bad on courses that have nothing to do with anything and which are taking up my time and energy.

It's kinda nice, actually, to stop worrying about not having a brilliant plan in place. No, I still don't love my job, and there is a bit of angst over that. After talking to my mom, I think I need to switch districts and move back up to high school (I'm stuck in a middle school this year) and while I don't think that'll make me suddenly adore going to work every day, it'll be better. And I'm saving money to buy a house with some land so I can raise some livestock, as one of my very truest passions is animal husbandry. I figure, who says your greatest joy has to be your job? I mean, sure, it should be tolerable, but sometimes they just pay for what really makes you happy, and that's alright too.

T J Deen
10-27-2012, 08:14 AM
I’ve experienced my fair share of fail when it comes to the work I do to earn a living.

I remember when I was leaving the military they told me stuff like “Oh yeah, tons of people will want to hire you since you’re a veteran.”

That wasn’t true. I came home to a very liberal fast paced city with few qualifications and went to two or three interviews a week for months with no luck and mostly ended up working in retail or low end office work if I was lucky.

So, I used the GI Bill and went to college. I was a very inexperienced life form in those days though back then I swore I knew everything about how the world works. I told myself I wanted to make video games so I got a degree in Comp Sci with a minor in English since I’ve always taken to writing with no problems. Not bragging, but I used to write papers for money. There’s a surplus of immigrant women attending college in this city who can’t seem to pass Eng101 to save their lives and it was an easy way for me to make some money at the time.

So then came the would-be success story of graduation and the great job landed at a then well-known financial investment power house that has since plummeted to bankruptcy and to mention the name would just anger people who lost all their money with them.

After the layoffs I still managed to receive what I thought was a hefty severance package where I was able to live at home in depression for a while as I played video games and gained weight. But eventually that money would’ve run out too. So by recommendation of a friend who was a cop I took the city
municipal tests even though the last thing I wanted to do after spending a year in Afghanistan was put on another uniform.

Then I remember one day I was home playing video games and thinking about how much money was left in the bank and wondering if I should start applying for another job or not and then out of nowhere my wife interrupted me and said “I think I’m pregnant”. I didn’t have an initial reaction but after a few seconds I raised the volume on the TV to drown her out because this was the last thing I wanted to deal with while Commander Sheppard accessed the first Prothean Beacon on Eden Prime.

So now after a few days of near insomnia and inner conflict I look on the table and there’s this little carbon copy post card thing with my name on it and I asked my wife what it was and she said it came in the mail a few days ago. So I read it and it turns out I scored a 102 on the test. (I really scored a 97 and I get +5 for being a veteran).

And so there you have it.

My job isn't the greatest but it pays very well. At the end of the day is that really such a great trade off though? Mind you I've been violently assaulted twice -one of which times woke up in the emergency room.

The one positive thing I have to say about it is that I've toughed it out for four and a half years and i'm six months away from reaching what's commonly referred to as top pay.

I’m hoping that when I reach top pay the extra cash will help me pursue my dreams on the side.

lucidzfl
10-27-2012, 07:38 PM
Here's a story for ya. By the way, I think accident sums it up...

My first day of high school I was handed a TI 81 calculator in Algebra 2 class. Instead of actually paying attention, I made an animated helicopter in the graph. (I failed that class)

Eventually, I got more and more into computers, but my mom wanted me to be a doctor so I went to school for pre-med. I was up all night writing code for search engines. I failed out of college and my parents cut me off completely.

I worked at Lowes Hardware 40 hrs a week to support myself and eventually go back to school for software design.

In 1997, I moved from Tennessee to South Florida for my first job at 19 as a search engine designer. (Only one in my family to have ever left Tennessee)

Fast forward 15 years....

I've since moved to northern California, and now Portland Oregon, as a senior Architect and Software Development manager in charge of teams in Cali, Or, Australia, Germany and Malaysia.

So... Accident. I never saw myself doing this...

tamara
10-28-2012, 04:06 AM
If I had no limitations, if money and time weren't issues, I'd change jobs every year or two and travel in between.

For the first 15 years of my working life, my record for staying in a job was one year, and I switched entire industries every three years or so. I was in professional fields, so the pay, stability, and job satisfaction were all fine. I just got bored, so I'd move on. I've now been self-employed for 9 years, but the first three was doing something entirely different from the last five. I only WISH I'd thought of travelling in between. Brilliant! :)


I don't know what I want because I want to try everything... To choose something is to take everything else off the table. ;)


It sounds like you have analysis paralysis. My son is going through a similar thing right now. He's finishing up high school and is totally overwhelmed by the idea that he's supposed to choose a life-long career sometime in the very near future. We're encouraging him to think of it as a starting point. Get lots of experiences. Learn a bunch of different skills. Make a decision and choose a path to get you down the road, then see where you are. You can always return to other ideas if you're not happy where you land. Haphazard job-hopping, no. Strategic re-assessment, yes.

crunchyblanket
10-28-2012, 04:18 PM
Completely by accident. I left uni, got a job at the London Dungeon doing group bookings. Left that and got a job as a hospital receptionist. They promised me a full-time position after three months but never delivered, so I went and complained to the head of department, who was apparently impressed with me, because she immediately offered me a position in the pathology department as a medical laboratory assistant. I'm an English graduate, and had never worked in a lab in my life, so it was quite surprising.

I now work in a different lab, doing pre-natal screening. It's not where I want to be forever (I wish I'd studied Biomedical Science at uni instead, to be honest, but I can't afford the fees a second time round and four years full-time study is too big a commitment at this stage in my life...)

Xelebes
11-04-2012, 10:05 AM
I was kinda boxed in. It was either do what I do (accounting) or continue to struggle on disability payments. Fortunately found an employer who valued my work and kept me past probation.

OneTeam OneDream
11-16-2012, 06:36 AM
I quit professional baseball to get married....

Medievalist
11-16-2012, 06:40 AM
I was a grad student in the UCLA English Ph.D. program. I was hired as an R.A. by a professor who wanted me to finish the research and note taking part of updating his handlist of rhetorical terms, and turn it into an ebook using his Mac SE and HyperCard. That led me to more work with HyperCard and Macs, and ebook production for The Voyager Company, which led to writing documentation, which led to software development and user support and technical editing and more writing . . .

Booker
11-30-2012, 10:30 AM
I'm happily unemployed.

Susan Anwin
02-07-2013, 09:56 AM
My bf's parents showed me this ad in the newspaper about the U.S. embassy looking for Security Guards and here I am. After a year of the filthiest, most menial 'classic-new-immigrant' jobs I finally have a decent job :knocks on wood:

Satori1977
02-23-2013, 08:06 AM
Well technically I am working in the field I went to school for, but my current job wasn't really planned.

I am a vet tech, have worked various different places, took some time off to spend more time with my kids and take care of my sick mom. I had been currently unemployed for 3 years, but situations changed, and I needed a paycheck again. In this field, it can be hard to get a job because if you aren't using your skills, you lose them. I couldn't even get an interview anywhere.

Noticed the local humane society was hiring, so I applied. They didn't require a degree, only experience, so I figured I had a good shot. I planned, if I got the job, that I would get current experience, then find a better job at a hospital again. Well it has been almost a year and I am still there, loving it. My boss is amazing, I have the best coworkers, and for the most part, the job is very rewarding and fun. I don't plan on leaving any time soon.

maryrider
02-23-2013, 08:18 AM
I've always wanted to show the world the way I see it. So, my junior year of high school my dad bought me a camera. After that I decided that's how I wanted to go about showing the world through my eyes. Went to an art school for two years, had to leave because the college was being sued from the government, and run my own small business while taking hotel pictures.

Now, I'm the same way with writing. Teachers told me in high school and college I should consider writing as a profession because I, "have a way with words." I never took them seriously until now.

BradyH1861
02-23-2013, 07:42 PM
I took the civil service test and passed it.

Robbert
02-23-2013, 10:02 PM
I've been working as an engineer for almost ten years (Middle East).

Over the next ten years I was working with people with special needs (UK).

In the years since I graduated with a degree in Social Work (2007), I've done a bit of teaching as well as translating manuals from English to German.

Brightdreamer
02-23-2013, 10:14 PM
Let's see... my first job, the "putting things on shelves" phase of my career, I got because I answered an ad in the paper. I was the only one who showed up for the interview and didn't ask for a guarantee that I'd be off early enough on Fridays to party.

Four years later, I left to try for something better.

A year later, I got a very definitive "no" from the universe on my next career choice. (Medical transcriptionist... which meant I knew just enough medical terms to be really freaked during a health crisis. Long story short, I decided that if I ever heard another medical term again, it'd be too soon...)

Once I was in job-hunting shape again, I heard, through a friend of my mother's, that they were desperate for people at the library shipping center. I suppose I was, once again, the only one who showed up who didn't ask to get off early for Friday parties, because I managed to land the job.

So now, instead of putting things on shelves, I put books on a belt. But it leaves me with plenty of thinking time, which I use to plot stories. And I get to spend a lot of time around books. Beautiful, wonderful books...

(I'm going to have to punch this up in my autobiography... maybe stick in an alien attack or a dragon or two.)

Rufus Coppertop
02-23-2013, 10:23 PM
I had a job a the local psychiatric hospital. Two days per week I was a boiler attendant and three days, an assistant handyman.

After three months it was driving me batshit crazy so one day while changing a light globe over in nursing admin, I applied to become a psychiatric nurse.

mccardey
02-23-2013, 10:48 PM
I retired. I love being old. Can I suggest - you should all be old. :)

Brightdreamer
02-23-2013, 11:12 PM
I retired. I love being old. Can I suggest - you should all be old. :)

Eh, sounds nice, but definitely out of my price range. (Both retiring and being old, at this point... have you seen health care costs lately?)

mccardey
02-23-2013, 11:19 PM
Eh, sounds nice, but definitely out of my price range. (Both retiring and being old, at this point... have you seen health care costs lately?)

Ah, but I'm not American :)

Brightdreamer
02-23-2013, 11:25 PM
Ah, but I'm not American :)

True. But you are an Australian... near as I can tell from PBS specials and the Discovery Channel, it seems like everything down there's trying to kill you.

We have health insurance costs, you have a homicidal continent.

Either way, only the fittest survive to old age... ;)

mccardey
02-23-2013, 11:34 PM
True. But you are an Australian... near as I can tell from PBS specials and the Discovery Channel, it seems like everything down there's trying to kill you.

We have health insurance costs, you have a homicidal continent.

Either way, only the fittest survive to old age... ;)

That's adorable :)

buz
02-23-2013, 11:43 PM
I am a vet tech, have worked various different places, took some time off to spend more time with my kids and take care of my sick mom. I had been currently unemployed for 3 years, but situations changed, and I needed a paycheck again. In this field, it can be hard to get a job because if you aren't using your skills, you lose them. I couldn't even get an interview anywhere.

Noticed the local humane society was hiring, so I applied. They didn't require a degree, only experience, so I figured I had a good shot. I planned, if I got the job, that I would get current experience, then find a better job at a hospital again. Well it has been almost a year and I am still there, loving it. My boss is amazing, I have the best coworkers, and for the most part, the job is very rewarding and fun. I don't plan on leaving any time soon.

How very odd. I currently work at my local humane society and am considering becoming a vet tech because I can't make enough money to support myself. (I know. Becoming a vet tech is possibly the worst way to make money next to writing...but I'd still stand to make *enough*... I hope :p )

:D


I've always wanted to show the world the way I see it. So, my junior year of high school my dad bought me a camera. After that I decided that's how I wanted to go about showing the world through my eyes. Went to an art school for two years, had to leave because the college was being sued from the government, and run my own small business while taking hotel pictures.

Cool beans! :)


I retired. I love being old. Can I suggest - you should all be old. :)

NEVER. NO.

I really don't think I'll ever be able to retire...not at the rate I'm going...:p


True. But you are an Australian... near as I can tell from PBS specials and the Discovery Channel, it seems like everything down there's trying to kill you.

We have health insurance costs, you have a homicidal continent.

Either way, only the fittest survive to old age... ;)

I think I'd have a better chance on the homicidal continent. :D

angeluscado
02-24-2013, 01:04 AM
I had some emotional issues in high school, which affected my grades. They were good enough to get into college, but not university and no chance at any kind of scholarships. Further education wasn't an option due to financial reasons, so I started working.

I ended up working at a local grocery store chain. Two and a half years after I started working there, the store closed down to be bulldozed for a Wal-Mart Superstore. I took it as my chance to get out, so I did some research, found a certificate program I liked, did a bit of financial planning - I'd saved a fair chunk of change from working - and that fall I was enrolled in the Legal Office Assistant program. A year later I graduated and started working. i worked at a couple of offices until I got the job I have now - three years with the same firm doing personal injury law, working with several different lawyers. The work is interesting most of the time and the people I work with are pretty awesome. I make a decent living for the amount of education I have and I have enough time and energy to do what i like in my free time. No complaints, really.

Satori1977
02-24-2013, 03:57 AM
How very odd. I currently work at my local humane society and am considering becoming a vet tech because I can't make enough money to support myself. (I know. Becoming a vet tech is possibly the worst way to make money next to writing...but I'd still stand to make *enough*... I hope :p )

:D



Being a vet tech is wonderful work. If you love animals and medical stuff (my mom tried to convince me to be a nurse, a lot more money, but people are gross!), it could be a good fit for you. You won't be rich, but depending on what you do/where you work, you can make decent money. Like at a university teaching hospital, a specialty hospital, if you specialize, etc. It is rewarding, but can be extremely stressful too. And frustrating. I have to say, the more I work around animals, the more I dislike people.

If you ever have any questions, feel free to PM me. :)

Chase
02-24-2013, 04:51 AM
I retired. I love being old. Can I suggest - you should all be old.

Took McCardey's advice and became old.

Leading up to it, I served ten years as a U.S. military small arms instructor, during which I wrote more and more local safety manuals. After discharge, I studied English on the GI Bill, taught high school, went to grad school, and taught college English.

Once old, I retired. Those who can't teach can often edit.

Liralen
02-24-2013, 07:14 AM
. . . . it seemed like a good idea at the time?

No college, other than a myriad of worthless credits at the local JuCo. Didn't find out until a few years ago that yes, I did have scholarship offers from my SATs and my mother made sure I never saw them. Yeah, she's a real piece of work. So . . . there went my plans to be out of law school by the time I was 22 (I graduated from HS three weeks after my 16th birthday).

Unemployed right now (a long series of choices based on doing "the right thing" -- taking care of someone else -- which have proved over and over that no good deed ever goes unpunished), but there seems to be a job in my profession (paralegal) opening up for me shortly. I've dreaded going back to it in many ways, because the office politics in law offices is usually as nasty as it gets, and the pay isn't nearly commensurate with the responsibility and effort (if you're serious about your work), but this one's about an ideal situation -- love the attorney, his wife is great and there's no other support staff.

All that said, would I advise someone to go to school to become a paralegal? Oh, HELL no.

Sometimes I look back on the time I spent working as a temp in a toothbrush factory and realize that there's a lot to be said for being able to count what you've done at the end of the shift, box it up and go home and forget about it. Mindless, repetitive tasks leave your brain free to go do its own thing.

Worst job ever: selling vacuum cleaners.

Al Stevens
02-24-2013, 09:17 AM
Coming out of school I needed a mindless day job so I could concentrate on my career as a jazz musician. I lived in the DC area, so I took a job at CIA as a courier. They turned me into a computer programmer. That was my main profession for the next several decades. I never once delivered a pouch or chauffered a VIP. And, yes, I did stay with music as a secondary career throughout most of those years.

Pyekett
02-24-2013, 09:34 PM
I knew since I was three. Always wanted to be just like the old, crusty geezer who fixed all the broken things in my family's life.

And so I studied and studied, and tested and hooped and jumped, and I kept going because every time I was in a situation where I couldn't fix things for somebody, I felt like the world would end.

Spoiler: the world doesn't end that way, not just because bad things happen. And you know what else? Sometimes people don't want you to fix things for them. (I know. But true. Whoulda thunk?) Still, sometimes I get to fix things, and I listen to a lot of stories, and a lot of kids draw me pictures.

I think they think I'm the old, crusty geezer that fixes things. That'll do.