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Zombie Kat
10-17-2012, 03:51 PM
Thought some of you might be interested in this:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-19959565

"Being an author was specifically associated with increased likelihood of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, unipolar depression, anxiety disorders, substance abuse, and suicide. In addition, we found an association between creative professions and first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anorexia nervosa, and for siblings of patients with autism."

Original paper http://scottbarrykaufman.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Kyaga-et-al.-2012.pdf

ccarver30
10-17-2012, 04:29 PM
Great. :|

Gilroy Cullen
10-17-2012, 04:39 PM
This explains SO much... :cry:

aruna
10-17-2012, 04:49 PM
This only means that creative people need to take extra care of their mental processes. Mental health is a choice.

leahzero
10-17-2012, 04:53 PM
This is the kind of common knowledge we've had for a long time that's finally being validated by scientific study.

What I wonder is which drives the other: do those with a strong creative drive end up working in environments that contribute to triggering/exacerbating mental illness (high stress, judgment, isolation, etc.), or does the illness precede the creative work and fuel it?

I'm sure it's both, to some degree.

Zombie Kat
10-17-2012, 04:56 PM
Mental health is a choice.

Sorry, but that's not true. It's not something I want to argue about, but the conditions mentioned in that study are not something a person gets any choice in and your comment comes across as very ignorant of mental illness. I'm not saying this to be confrontational, but it makes me very sad that anyone would think schizophrenia or bipolar or depression are things we have any control over.

Torgo
10-17-2012, 05:03 PM
This only means that creative people need to take extra care of their mental processes. Mental health is a choice.

Wait, what?

shadowwalker
10-17-2012, 05:12 PM
Mental health is a choice.

You might want to rethink (and retract) that statement. Patently untrue.

bearilou
10-17-2012, 05:29 PM
I must not be a very good writer or can't count on becoming one, then. Or that my chances are very slim.

:Shrug:

Alitriona
10-17-2012, 05:36 PM
"For example, the restrictive and intense interests of someone with autism and the manic drive of a person with bipolar disorder might provide the necessary focus and determination for genius and creativity."

Are we calling Autism a mental illness now rather than a developmental disorder? -- DISLIKE

mada
10-17-2012, 05:42 PM
This only means that creative people need to take extra care of their mental processes. Mental health is a choice.

Yes, because those who suffer from or live with mental illness choose to live in isolation and pain, right? Contrary to popular belief, living with a mental illness is actually a ball and I can't understand why more people wouldn't want to live this way!

mada
10-17-2012, 05:44 PM
"For example, the restrictive and intense interests of someone with autism and the manic drive of a person with bipolar disorder might provide the necessary focus and determination for genius and creativity."

Are we calling Autism a mental illness now rather than a developmental disorder? -- DISLIKE

I agree with you, but I can understand the point that the article made regarding Autism:

For example, the restrictive and intense interests of someone with autism and the manic drive of a person with bipolar disorder might provide the necessary focus and determination for genius and creativity.

Shadow_Ferret
10-17-2012, 05:48 PM
I don't remember choosing to have ADHD. Nor did my son choose to have it.

"As a group, those in the creative professions were no more likely to suffer from psychiatric disorders than other people."


Ok. Doesn't this quote say, "Well, ok, we did a study and we wanted to show creative types are crazy, but um... Nevermind. Can you publish our article anyway!"

James D. Macdonald
10-17-2012, 05:50 PM
Mental health is a choice.

Appendicitis is also a choice, I suppose.

Mr Flibble
10-17-2012, 05:56 PM
Given the preceding sentence, I suspect that Aruna meant 'looking after your mental health is a choice', which it is. I can look after myself, as I've been doing for a while now, and not have any, or only mild, bipolar episodes. Or I can ignore it and end up a bloody wreck.

Anyway, tbh, I didn't think this was news?

Kitty27
10-17-2012, 06:08 PM
I have always believed creative people to be a tad "touched" as we say in the South.

By this,I don't mean the serious and debilitating illnesses mentioned in the article. There are many talented writers who have battled them, as we all know.I have a close relative with severe manic depression and that is not anything to joke about.

By"touched",I mean no mental illness whatsoever but plain old thrown off. We sit around creating imaginary people, carrying on conversations with them,coming up with stuff that is frankly insane and having a high old time doing so. People who don't write don't get it. But other writers do. We share a communal lunacy is what I am trying to say.

I listen to a writer buddy talk passionately about his book which is magical realism crossed with Western and fornicating pandas lurking about. I don't blink an eye at all. I talk about horrific plots and situations that come from my mind and no fellow writer privately wonders if I am a future serial killer.

Very nice thing to have!

Susan Littlefield
10-17-2012, 06:20 PM
Oh brother, not again. This type of thread has been started very often on this board. ;)

Did you know being a cop, lawyer, dig ditcher, nurse, secretary, doctor, and any other career you can think of, are also linked to mental illness?

People with mental illness come from all walks of life.

Nobody chooses to have mental illness, and mental illness does not chase after the creative people of the world. :)

Susan Littlefield
10-17-2012, 06:24 PM
Mental health is a choice.

Aruna, do you mean taking care of one's mental health is a choice?

In any event, that might not be completely accurate. Sad as it is, some people may not have the resources or the capacity to look after their mental health.

Zombie Kat
10-17-2012, 06:51 PM
Oh brother, not again. This type of thread has been started very often on this board. ;)


I didn't start the thread to stir something up, I just read a paper that mentioned authors and thought others might like to see it too!

Zombie Kat
10-17-2012, 06:55 PM
"As a group, those in the creative professions were no more likely to suffer from psychiatric disorders than other people."


Ok. Doesn't this quote say, "Well, ok, we did a study and we wanted to show creative types are crazy, but um... Nevermind. Can you publish our article anyway!"


The lack of publication of negative results in science is something that many a scientist, me included, wants to see changed! According to the paper, there was no link between mental health disorders and creative professions as a whole but there was specifically with being an author. But I do think it's important to take the research for what it is - a statistical study showing that there is a higher incidence of certain conditions among professional authors. Not that all writers are crazy, or that mental illness is some kind of romantic affliction that makes us into poets.

*Slinks away wondering if I've accidentally unleashed something terrible in starting this thread*

aruna
10-17-2012, 07:10 PM
Sorry, but that's not true. It's not something I want to argue about, but the conditions mentioned in that study are not something a person gets any choice in and your comment comes across as very ignorant of mental illness. I'm not saying this to be confrontational, but it makes me very sad that anyone would think schizophrenia or bipolar or depression are things we have any control over.

On lord! I knew I should have kept my mouth shut!


Aruna, do you mean taking care of one's mental health is a choice?

.

That's more what I mean. I do NOT mean that once you have one of these serious conditions you have a choice and can just snap your fingers and get better like that. I mean that if we start early enough we can - perhaps - prevent them. The mind is far more malleable, and has far more possibilities, that most people can imagine.

And it follows that someone with creative tendencies, knowing of the risk and the connection, could perhaps take care.

There are for instance many studies about the beneficial effects of meditation on mental health. I have myself experienced first hand, and seen second hand in hundreds of cases, how people have been helped. But I certainly didn't want to get into an argument! Apologies if anybody felt I was being flippant about mental illness. I do take it seriously - I work in that area, after all. Or used to.

I guess I worded my first post badly.

aruna
10-17-2012, 07:13 PM
In any event, that might not be completely accurate. Sad as it is, some people may not have the resources or the capacity to look after their mental health.

Also, they don't know HOW to. And have nobody (qualified) to show them how.

Thank you for trying to understand what I meant.

LBlankenship
10-17-2012, 07:27 PM
"Being an author was specifically associated with increased likelihood of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, unipolar depression, anxiety disorders, substance abuse, and suicide. In addition, we found an association between creative professions and first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anorexia nervosa, and for siblings of patients with autism."


Pshh. Tell me something I don't know. :D

p.s. IME, writing is a workable coping mechanism for depression...

Stacia Kane
10-17-2012, 07:31 PM
Oh brother, not again. This type of thread has been started very often on this board. ;)




No one is forcing you to read or post in discussions here.

ladybritches
10-17-2012, 07:57 PM
Pshh. Tell me something I don't know. :D

p.s. IME, writing is a workable coping mechanism for depression...

That's been my experience too.

Jamesaritchie
10-17-2012, 08:48 PM
I've been hearing this for so many years that I think I was still drinking breast milk the first time. It means about as much as a fart in a whirlwind. Pretty much every group you look at also has a higher incidence of these things than the "general public", which really doesn't exist. The police officer group is higher in a number of areas, and the doctor group is higher in others.

And no group, including writers, is very high. "Twice as like" mater only if the number you multiply by two is a large one. It isn't. Twice as likely still means most of these things are rare.

I don't believe mental illness is a choice, but I know we call several things mental illness that aren't. . .unless everyone on earth is mentally ill. Which is, I suppose, a possibility.

jjdebenedictis
10-17-2012, 09:17 PM
The question of causation is an interesting one.

Are people who are coping with (possibly very mild) mental health issues drawn to certain forms of art to ease their symptoms? Or are certain attributes that make a person more prone to mental health issues also highly useful traits for artists in certain professions to have?

It's an intriguing study, but I'd like to know more.

willietheshakes
10-17-2012, 09:38 PM
Was anyone else's initial response to this "well, duh"?

mccardey
10-17-2012, 10:03 PM
Oh brother, not again. This type of thread has been started very often on this board. ;)

Did you know being a cop, lawyer, dig ditcher, nurse, secretary, doctor, and any other career you can think of, are also linked to mental illness?

People with mental illness come from all walks of life.

Nobody chooses to have mental illness, and mental illness does not chase after the creative people of the world. :)

This.

The article seems to say that creative people may be more likely than some to have family members with mental health issues.

The same could be said of cops, lawyers, ditch diggers, nurses, secretaries, doctors and people from any other career if you stick them against a projected, homogenous norm, couldn't it? So I'm thinking the study itself might be more nuanced.


ETA:
People with mental illness come from all walks of life.

Thank you, Susan. I tend to agree.

Zombie Kat
10-17-2012, 10:22 PM
Pretty much every group you look at also has a higher incidence of these things than the "general public", which really doesn't exist. The police officer group is higher in a number of areas, and the doctor group is higher in others.

And no group, including writers, is very high. "Twice as like" mater only if the number you multiply by two is a large one. It isn't. Twice as likely still means most of these things are rare.


I completely agree about the small numbers, and with everyone who is saying mental health can be found in all walks of life. The study is pretty useless from a mental health perspective. It doesn't help us predict mental illnesses or treat them or tell us anything that can be applied to individual humans.

However, my own interest was more esoteric and maybe a little heartless considering the suffering caused by mental illnesses. Lots of our understanding about how the human body/brain works comes from investigating the extremes or the rare conditions where things don't work quite as they should. Perhaps studies such as this one could lead to new lines of research that will give us a better understanding of how the brain functions. Does schizophrenia, in certain cases, allow connections to be made between unrelated ideas to make something new? Do some autistic spectrum disorders occasionally give a person the necessary perseverance and obsession to excel at something? The answers aren't going to be applicable to every sufferer, but maybe they can give us some clues as to how, for want of a better word, the normal brain works when it comes to creativity. I think that's interesting but then I'm a massive geek.

NeuroFizz
10-17-2012, 10:46 PM
I believe this is the article:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022395612002804

If the link doesn't work, go to GoogleScholar and type in a search for the study's primary author (get it from the press release in the original post).

Here is a passage from the abstract (I don't have time to read the entire article right now, so I can't evaluate the overall quality, but it is in a peer reviewed journal).

Except for bipolar disorder, individuals with overall creative professions were not more likely to suffer from investigated psychiatric disorders than controls. However, being an author was specifically associated with increased likelihood of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, unipolar depression, anxiety disorders, substance abuse, and suicide.

From Kyaga et al., 2012. Journal of Psychiatric Research


Keep in mind these data are for clinically-diagnosed individuals. From many years of hanging out at AW, I get the impression that a large number of people here think it's either "cool" or a badge of honor to say they are crazy or insane, as if that gives a leg up on the writing profession. It's the "I'm creative therefore I must be insane or crazy" phenomenon. There is nothing cool in having a mental disorder. What is cool is what people with those disorders do and how they use their talents to succeed in their personal lives and in expressing their personal style of creativity. And I'll echo jj's comments above on causation. A correlation like that presented in this paper doesn't necessarily say anything about causation, so all of the people who like to think writers have to be a bit crazy or insane, should realize that clinical mental disorders are serious issues that impact lives beyond the creative avenues of the individuals. I my mind, people who jump on that train because it is a cool thing to say do a disservice to writers who have to deal with the clinical aspects of mental disorders and yet are able to entertain us through their creativity and productivity.

Susan Littlefield
10-17-2012, 11:33 PM
I didn't start the thread to stir something up, I just read a paper that mentioned authors and thought others might like to see it too!

Just to be clear, my comment was meant more in jest than anything, thus the ;).

Susan Littlefield
10-17-2012, 11:39 PM
No one is forcing you to read or post in discussions here.

With all due respect, I didn't say anyone was forcing me to read or post in discussions. My comment was meant in jest, which is why I put the ;) at the end.

mccardey
10-17-2012, 11:42 PM
Just to be clear, my comment was meant more in jest than anything, thus the ;).

Oh.

Well mine wasn't.

I know (many, many) creative people, none of whom have mental illnesses: and I know and love some people who do have mental illnesses, and who would be horrified to think that mental illness was supposed to be a signifier of something incredibly positive.

And most of those people are creative, too. In fact, I think most people are.

Susan Littlefield
10-17-2012, 11:48 PM
Oh.

Well mine wasn't.

I know (many, many) creative people, none of whom have mental illnesses: and I know and love some people who do have mental illnesses, and who would be horrified to think that mental illness was supposed to be a signifier of something incredibly positive.

And most of those people are creative, too. In fact, I think most people are.

No, just the "oh brother...." comment. It offended a few people, which was not my intention. However, I stand by the rest of what I wrote.

strictlytopsecret
10-18-2012, 01:35 AM
The below quote from the article is quite intrguing. What are your thoughts?


We found no positive association between psychopathology and
overall creative professions except for bipolar disorder. Rather,
individuals holding creative professions had a significantly reduced
likelihood of being diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective
disorder, unipolar depression, anxiety disorders, alcohol abuse,
drug abuse, autism, ADHD, or of committing suicide.Might creative occupations mitigate against development of psychiatric conditions OR might those who are psychologically robust be attracted to "creative professions" (which, interestingly, included those engaged in scientific endeavors)?

Authors' increased risk of psychoapthology in general and increased risk of completed suicides (whether diagnosed with psychiatric disorders or not) is troubling. But again, we are left with the question of whether those predisposed to mental illness are attracted to writing careers or if writing careers somehow contribute to the development of psychpathology.

Interesting article.

~STS~

LindaJeanne
10-18-2012, 01:52 AM
The lack of publication of negative results in science is something that many a scientist, me included, wants to see changed! According to the paper, there was no link between mental health disorders and creative professions as a whole but there was specifically with being an author. But I do think it's important to take the research for what it is - a statistical study showing that there is a higher incidence of certain conditions among professional authors. Not that all writers are crazy, or that mental illness is some kind of romantic affliction that makes us into poets.

*Slinks away wondering if I've accidentally unleashed something terrible in starting this thread*

Exactly! Whether the evidence discovered in a study supports or refutes the initial hypothosis, if it was a well-run study, the results are still useful.


(Another pet peeve of mine: when people mock a study that confirms something that's "common sense", as though it was therefore silly to test it. Even though there was a time when it was common sense that the earth was obviously immobile, and the sun obviously revolves around the earth. End rant... back to your regularly scheduled thread topic.)

Mr Flibble
10-18-2012, 02:38 AM
And no group, including writers, is very high. "Twice as like" mater only if the number you multiply by two is a large one. It isn't. Twice as likely still means most of these things are rare.

One in four people will suffer mental health problems in the course of a year. (http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/help-information/mental-health-statistics/)

I don't know about you, but doubling that to one in two seems a fairly large number to me.

GiantRampagingPencil
10-18-2012, 03:54 AM
I found this very comforting. If I have to suffer from this damnable disease, then it is better that it gives me something in return.

At the risk of people raining fire, brimstone, frogs and batteries down on my head, I'm okay (YOU MAY NOT BE, THIS IS MY PERSONAL OPINION) with people romanticizing depression. It is WAY better than being stigmatized. The way I look at it, I'm depressed either way, and it's kinda nice to be one of the cool kids. Now if I can only find a beret in my size. I already have a human skull to remind me of my mortality. (Okay, it's actually made of alabaster, but it's still pretty cool.)

Mr Flibble
10-18-2012, 04:06 AM
I'm okay with it too. Questions like 'So, like Stephen Fry then?' tickle me.

Yes, I am the female Stephen Fry, so if I say it, it must be true, mwhahahaha!

*cough*

Nah, I'm fine any way, as long it's not 'meh you're making it up' (one of my brothers) or that subtle moving away thing, or trying to blame my mental illness for me getting annoyed at (or indeed everything you don't like me doing), well, things that would annoy the heck out of anyone sane, surely. No, I am not temperamental because I have bipolar, however that 'colleague' shouting 'F*** off' in my face in front of all my customers when I asked nicely if he could help me - yes that makes me temperamental. No, not because I have 'a condition'. It would make you temperamental too. If I didn't care, that would make me nuts.

I might be nuts - that doesn't make me stupid.

Williebee
10-18-2012, 04:24 AM
This only means that creative people need to take extra care of their mental processes. Mental health is a choice.

In part, at least, this is true. We can make the choice, as mentioned above, to try to take care of our mental health.

There are studies out there that indicate that mental exercises, and physical ones, help to preserve our mental health -- fight off the onset of alzheimer's for example. Like juggling. (http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/health/HealthRepublish_1029268.htm)

Mr Flibble
10-18-2012, 04:35 AM
My son, aged ten:

'No one is really normal, as such. Which means the people that ARE totally normal are, well, weird. And that means weird is actually normal. Everyone's just weird in their own way'


I love my son.

calieber
10-18-2012, 05:12 AM
"For example, the restrictive and intense interests of someone with autism and the manic drive of a person with bipolar disorder might provide the necessary focus and determination for genius and creativity."

Are we calling Autism a mental illness now rather than a developmental disorder? -- DISLIKE
The write-up I saw used the broader-seeming term "psychiatric diagnoses" rather than "mental illness."


I have always believed creative people to be a tad "touched" as we say in the South.
[...]
By"touched",I mean no mental illness whatsoever but plain old thrown off. We sit around creating imaginary people, carrying on conversations with them,coming up with stuff that is frankly insane and having a high old time doing so.

I think most people do that. Most toddlers, anyway. Some people are more effectively dissuaded from continuing to than others.


The question of causation is an interesting one.

Are people who are coping with (possibly very mild) mental health issues drawn to certain forms of art to ease their symptoms? Or are certain attributes that make a person more prone to mental health issues also highly useful traits for artists in certain professions to have?

It wouldn't surprise me if it's determined that creativity and mental illness have similar characteristics, not just in a metaphorical or philosophical sense but neurochemically/neuroanatomically.

GiantRampagingPencil
10-18-2012, 05:29 AM
I'm okay with it too. Questions like 'So, like Stephen Fry then?' tickle me.

Yes, I am the female Stephen Fry, so if I say it, it must be true, mwhahahaha!



Why do I automatically assume a male avatar mean male user. I always do it. Always.

My cousin is bipolar. The reaction of his fiancee to the diagnosis was to break off their engagement. So, yeah, there are worse things than being thought of as a mad genius.

RedWombat
10-18-2012, 05:32 AM
This sort of article goes through artist circles every now and again.

Generally it gets a bit of an eye roll from me, but I do worry that some artists I've known won't get treated for their very real illnesses because they're afraid it'll somehow de-art them. "But what if Van Gogh had been on medication?!" goes the refrain.

Personally, I think if he'd been on medication he would have lived to be eighty and cranked out twice as many paintings. Depression never did anything for me but tank my productivity.

Loveless
10-18-2012, 06:15 AM
I often wonder if people are born ill or if they become ill. Are bad genes running amok in their blood or do social happenings play a role in it? It could very well be that said person was born with bad genes putting them at a disadvantage. Whatever happens to them next would determine their fate.

I'm currently studying psychology, and guess what? Creativity isn't something normal. Creativity is something that's just there. But look how far humanity has gone in history because of it. We're sending people to distant worlds for crying out loud! Not to mention growing organs in laboratories. And may I add face transplants to the platter? All of this is a product of thinking outside the norm. True it does come at the expense of the person (mainly ridicule and shunning from society), but I think it is worth it in the end.

P.S. I was often afraid of taking my medication for fear that it may stunt or even "shut down" my creative brain. All the fuss was for nothing in the end. I felt better in weeks and my brain was still the same :D

GiantRampagingPencil
10-18-2012, 10:54 PM
It wouldn't surprise me if it's determined that creativity and mental illness have similar characteristics, not just in a metaphorical or philosophical sense but neurochemically/neuroanatomically.

It wouldn't surprise me either. If the workmanship on our brains is a little off, then our minds will be a little off--both for the better, and the worse.

EMaree
10-19-2012, 12:44 AM
or trying to blame my mental illness for me getting annoyed at (or indeed everything you don't like me doing)

Isn't that the most frustrating thing? I informed a friend about my mental health, accidentally snapped at my other half the same day, and the next morning the friend greeting me with "So was that one of your crazy moments, then?" :rant:

Studies like these are important because a struggling creative out there might read the news and take it as a sign to go see a doctor about their worries. That's a hugely important thing.

shadowwalker
10-19-2012, 01:01 AM
or trying to blame my mental illness for me getting annoyed at (or indeed everything you don't like me doing), well, things that would annoy the heck out of anyone sane, surely.

Ever get justifiably angry at something while hospitalized, or in the presence of your doctor? Big no-no. The mentally ill are not allowed to get angry...

Mr Flibble
10-19-2012, 01:06 AM
Ever get justifiably angry at something while hospitalized, or in the presence of your doctor? Big no-no. The mentally ill are not allowed to get angry...

Hah! Yes. And then say try more drugs! More drugs! Yes, even if they do render you incapable of speech! *mutters under breath* And my husband didn't realise to start with, so he was all 'now, you should do what the doctor says'. Then he heard him, and said 'Holy crap, what is this guy? A Columbian drugs baron?' and then we complained about that particular doctor and my MP tore them off a strip and I got a nice new doctor who understands when I get pissed off at something she too would be pissed off at and doesn't try to chemically cosh me out of it.

/end derail

ETA: is making great material for a new UF I have in mind though :D

buz
10-19-2012, 04:23 AM
I often wonder if people are born ill or if they become ill. Are bad genes running amok in their blood or do social happenings play a role in it?


This should get covered in your psych course soon. I hope. :D

But what forms a person (psychological disorder or no) is neither nature or nurture; it's both. Some psychological conditions have a higher genetic component than others, but it's all about gene-environment interaction--not exclusively one or the other.

GiantRampagingPencil
10-19-2012, 07:11 AM
Goes all the way back to Aristotle. For the acorn to grow into an oak, the potential to do so must exist in the acorn.

rwm4768
10-19-2012, 08:18 AM
My cousin is bipolar. The reaction of his fiancee to the diagnosis was to break off their engagement. So, yeah, there are worse things than being thought of as a mad genius.

Wow, that sucks for your cousin. I can't believe someone would break off their engagement over a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Most people with bipolar disorder are perfectly capable of functioning with medication and therapy.

On the topic of the article, I guess I'm one of the people with mental illness who's a writer. I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder last November. And I do find it helps me. I get the most writing done when I'm in a manic state. When I'm depressed, I don't get as much done, though. That's when I read.

Mr Flibble
10-19-2012, 11:26 AM
On the topic of the article, I guess I'm one of the people with mental illness who's a writer. I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder last November. And I do find it helps me. I get the most writing done when I'm in a manic state. When I'm depressed, I don't get as much done, though. That's when I read.


Writing while on a downer is tricky - I tend to use those times for editing - I can really be my own worst critic at that point! If I'm still drafting, well a few words a day is better than none and I feel better than if I've done nothing.

LaceWing
10-24-2012, 04:58 PM
Wow. If my connection weren't so slow, I'd rep every post in this thread.

What if The Keepers Of The DSM have set the bar too low? What if creativity were to be marked as not exceptional but expected? To me, only creatives are "normal." Non-creatives, those who make do, get along and merely get by are stunted. Methinks some rethinking needs to get done; a robotic engagement with life is, or damn well should be, considered an aberration.

elindsen
10-24-2012, 05:14 PM
Everyone is creative. Some people just get the opportuinty more than others. People with mental illness need to find ways of coping, so why not painting or in our case writing?

RemusShepherd
10-26-2012, 12:26 AM
I had this concept -- Creativity linked with mental illness -- as a worldbuilding detail in a novel. My early readers said they didn't buy it. I told them that whether it was true in the real world or not, my world worked that way, but they still didn't like it.

Oh, well. Fiction just can't be as weird as reality, I guess.

Count me as another extremely creative person with mental illness. I'm not too bad, though; paraphiliac with a touch of schizophrenia, or at least that's what the FBI told me.

frankiebrown
10-26-2012, 05:20 AM
Is anyone actually surprised by this?

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
10-26-2012, 05:59 AM
Knowing that aruna and Susan are two of the sweetest people on this board, and would not knowingly say something intentionally nasty, I understand what you meant, guys.

:e2bear: