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UrsusMinor
01-20-2006, 05:06 AM
I have a novel that has been rejected from on high by all of the major NY houses. They praise the book, but don't want to publish it because of certain political sensitivities.

I think that UK publishers would be far more receptive to it. Before I even raise this concept with my agent, I want to ask if this is the stupidest idea anyone has ever had. Has anyone ever taken their book Across the Water, been published, and then successfully re-invaded the US? How would one go about this? Would an American agent be wholly resistant to the idea?

I've nosed around the web a bit, and can;t find a shred of information on this topic.

Thanks...

waylander
01-20-2006, 06:24 PM
Most recent example I can think of is 'The Hickory Staff' that has just come out from Gollancz over here. American authors, but first published in the UK; not sure if it has a US deal.

Depends on who your agent knows over here. Many agencies have formal tie-ups with UK agencies. Can't hurt to ask.

UrsusMinor
01-20-2006, 09:10 PM
Happy to hear it's not unheard of or absurd. That will allow me to at least mention it to my agent without sounding as though I'm proposing something preposterous.

My agency does have tie-ups with agents in the main European countries, so perhaps there is some hope. Of course, as I understand foreign arrangements, one party or the other will get less than the typical commission, so one party or the other is likely to be less enthused--but as things stand my book has about as much chance of being picked up in NY as a biopic of Karl Marx would have in Hollywood during the McCarthy era.

And, actually, re-invading the US with the book is the least of my concerns. I'd be happy to be published solely in the UK. My agent, however, is bound to feel otherwise...

Really appreciate your taking the time to answer.

xhouseboy
01-26-2006, 04:05 AM
And, actually, re-invading the US with the book is the least of my concerns. I'd be happy to be published solely in the UK. My agent, however, is bound to feel otherwise...

Really appreciate your taking the time to answer.



Roald Dahl was published in the US before he was published in the UK (children's literature), and it wasn't until the young daughter of a UK publisher got hold of his first or second children's book from an American friend, and begged her dad to take a look at it, that Dahl also took off in the UK.

Re your agent - most agents in the UK have tie-ins with their US counterparts, and vice-versa. So he/she should be receptive at looking into whether this is a viable option for you?

UrsusMinor
01-26-2006, 05:10 AM
I had no idea abut Dahl--that's really interesting.

Apparently UK first isn't at all uncommon--James Purdy, John Knowles, George Chesbro, and, recently, Tristan Egolf, all had to go European first.

I appreciate the info.

aruna
01-26-2006, 09:20 PM
I'm trying to remember the name of a book that was published for a huge advance in the UK some years ago (high six figures), and later the author made it big in the US as well. It became a best seller there; it was some kind of crime novel, but occult stuff. About ten years ago - I don't know if there were any follow up novels. It's on the tip of my tongue - please help!

aruna
01-27-2006, 01:16 PM
I'm trying to remember the name of a book that was published for a huge advance in the UK some years ago (high six figures), and later the author made it big in the US as well. It became a best seller there; it was some kind of crime novel, but occult stuff. About ten years ago - I don't know if there were any follow up novels. It's on the tip of my tongue - please help!

This bugged me so much that I researched it - and found it!
It's Mallory's Oracle, by Carol O'Connell.
In this interview she mentions getting pubished inthe UK first, and why.

http://www.mysteryone.com/CarolOConnorInterview.htm

UrsusMinor
01-28-2006, 04:05 AM
I'm developing quite a collection, but most of the mentions are from some years back (James Purdy, John Knowles...and Nabokov's "Lolita, which was turned down by all of NYC). O'Connell's story is a heatening one, and fairly recent--the link was a godsend.

(Tony Fletcher's "Hedonism" turns out to be another re-import, too).

Thanks, all.