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Lady Ice
10-14-2012, 11:15 PM
Is there a word for this? (look at the bolded phrase):

“She even fancied—what will not men and women fancy in these matters?—that Will exaggerated his admiration for Mrs. Casaubon in order to pique herself”.

I guess it's like an aside but is there a specific grammatical term?

Fallen
10-15-2012, 12:27 AM
Parenthesis, perhaps:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parenthesis_(rhetoric)

The bolded type is giving extra supplementary material that (other than adding detail to the unbolded clause) has no grammatical tie to the unbolded clause (eg, you can take it out and the unbolded clause fits back together without loss of meaning.)

Chase
10-15-2012, 01:10 AM
As usual, the lovely and shackled Fallen is correct. It's also known in some grammars as digression.

Maryn
10-15-2012, 01:18 AM
I can't hear the word "digression" without cutting directly to Catcher in the Rye and debate club. I haven't read it in, like, 40 years, but still.

Maryn, whose modern digression is derailing

Roxxsmom
10-15-2012, 03:19 AM
parenthetical statement.

Fallen
10-15-2012, 11:48 AM
As usual, the lovely and shackled Fallen is correct. It's also known in some grammars as digression.

Digression? I didn't know that, Chase! And thank you, kind sir. ;)