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Maze Runner
10-04-2012, 10:27 PM
Were you were born and raised there? Have you moved around a lot in your life? What do you like, dislike about where you live? If it's rural, would u like to live in a city? Vice Versa? Are you dug in or looking for a door? Why do I ask? Eh, I'm a, just a guy who used to travel a lot, who's lived in different parts of the US, and now that I'm kind of in lock down, I miss it. Besides, I'm eh, just curious.

MaryMumsy
10-04-2012, 10:37 PM
I lived in probably a dozen places before I graduated high school. I went to nine schools in twelve years.

I've lived in this house for 37 years. Most of the time I like it here, but June, July, and August, not so much. We finally are set to see the end of triple digit temps.

I wouldn't mind traveling a little to see places I haven't been, but have no interest or desire to move.

MM

Lavern08
10-04-2012, 10:38 PM
I live in Virginia.

With the exception of the horrible humidity in the summertime, I love it.

I live in a townhouse in the suburbs, but I work in the city (about a 40-minute commute).

I'm close to shopping, all kinds of cultural and historical stuff, very nice restaurants and there's a church on every corner.

I've traveled to other places, but I've lived here all my life, and at this point, I think I'll stay put. ;)

firedrake
10-04-2012, 10:41 PM
I've moved more times than I can remember, including three separate stints in the US, once in Connecticut (6 months way back in the mists of time), Pittsburgh and Arizona. I'd go back to Pittsburgh in a heartbeat.

Now I'm pretty much permanently back in the UK. I live in a lovely little village, in a rented cottage which is about 250 years old. It's mouldy and damp, but it's home.

Perks
10-04-2012, 10:43 PM
I was raised in the DC area, but I've lived in the Asheville, NC area for the last nine years. I absolutely love it there.

CaroGirl
10-04-2012, 10:55 PM
I was born and raised in the suburbs of a single small city and went to one elementary and one high school. I finished HS and moved away but not terribly far. I've lived in the suburbs of a much larger city (about 3 hours away from my home town) for about 20 years. I love this city but would prefer to trade in the suburbs for a larger and more private property further out of town. Not a farm, but slightly more rural location.

ETA: I'm in Ottawa, Ontario, in case anyone's wondering.

Maze Runner
10-04-2012, 11:03 PM
I lived in probably a dozen places before I graduated high school. I went to nine schools in twelve years.

I've lived in this house for 37 years. Most of the time I like it here, but June, July, and August, not so much. We finally are set to see the end of triple digit temps.

I wouldn't mind traveling a little to see places I haven't been, but have no interest or desire to move.

MM

Had this kind of a childhood myself- went to three 2nd grades. I think maybe that's why the wanderlust is always with me

Alpha Echo
10-04-2012, 11:05 PM
I live in Virginia.

With the exception of the horrible humidity in the summertime, I love it.

I live in a townhouse in the suburbs, but I work in the city (about a 40-minute commute).

I'm close to shopping, all kinds of cultural and historical stuff, very nice restaurants and there's a church on every corner.

I've traveled to other places, but I've lived here all my life, and at this point, I think I'll stay put. ;)

Me too, to most of that! I work only a few minutes from my house, but we're about 40 minutes from DC. I have easy access to any store or restaurant I want. Traffic sucks, but...well...I don't have to sit in it because I work so close to home.

We'll retire in Belize. But we're happy here in the meantime.

Grew up in MD about an hour away. Moved around about 10 times on Long Island within about as many years. Finally settled and very happy. :)

EMaree
10-04-2012, 11:05 PM
I was born in the highlands of Scotland, lived on the Scottish islands for a while, and on the (rural) mainland for much longer. I moved from a tiny city to a sleepy fishing town, and I love it.

I occasionally crave the excitement (shopping! sushi! other writers!) of some of the Scottish cities like Edinburgh, but I'm not a fan of London's vastness. I've been across the Netherlands and adore everywhere there, especially Stockholm and Helsinki. I've also been to Spain a few times but after my parents had their villa broken into and, on a seperate occasion, their luggage slashed open I always feel unsafe there.

I'd love to travel more, to Canada and Japan and America, though I'm a homebird at heart. Scotland's definitely in my blood.

Maze Runner
10-04-2012, 11:06 PM
I've moved more times than I can remember, including three separate stints in the US, once in Connecticut (6 months way back in the mists of time), Pittsburgh and Arizona. I'd go back to Pittsburgh in a heartbeat.

Now I'm pretty much permanently back in the UK. I live in a lovely little village, in a rented cottage which is about 250 years old. It's mouldy and damp, but it's home.

Nice to hear you liked Pittsburgh- it definitely ain't for everybody. I lived all around the city, East Liberty, Brookline, Downtown, spent a large part of my childhood, back and forth to Garfield, near the corner of Negley and Broad. I know it's bad now, wasn't all that great then, but I loved it. Very vivid memories of that area. What neighborhood, suburb did u live in?

Anninyn
10-04-2012, 11:10 PM
I do. I live in Norfolk, in the UK, and for all my typically-british complaints about it, I love it. I live in the city, and it's a beautiful city with a lot of history. It's small enough to walk across in a day, but big enough to have all the important things, and it's safe and friendly. I am surrounded on all sides by miles of lush fenland and farmland, and I'm only an hours drive from the coast. And the sky. You've never seen sky like Norfolk sky. It's huge. Artists have always come here, just to paint our sky. It's especially wonderful at the coast.

I can imagine Norfolk is probably quite boring for people not as into books and old buildings as me, but they aren't proper people.

I have just bought a three bedroom maisonette right at the border between the city and a village that it grew into, a newish construction - build sometime in the seventies. It's clean and bright and gets sun all day, all year round. It's big enough for us... and for the family we plan to have soon.

If we have enough money when Jos retires, we'll retire to a nice cottage in one of the nearby villages. Far enough out to have lovely views, close enough to be convenient.

Maze Runner
10-04-2012, 11:15 PM
Me too, to most of that! I work only a few minutes from my house, but we're about 40 minutes from DC. I have easy access to any store or restaurant I want. Traffic sucks, but...well...I don't have to sit in it because I work so close to home.

We'll retire in Belize. But we're happy here in the meantime.

Grew up in MD about an hour away. Moved around about 10 times on Long Island within about as many years. Finally settled and very happy. :)

Used to want to live in Belize. I don't really know that much about it- just seemed like the most exotic setting I could think of where they still spoke English.

I lived in Baltimore for a year when I was a kid- My stepfather (he wouldn't last for long) was in law school. I have very spotty memories of the place, I don't know why. It's strange, 'cause I can remember all my teachers, classmates, before and after, but my memory of that school and any of the people in it is just like a black void. I'll never forget the hardshell crabs though! Also, one double header I went to that the Orioles took from the Tigers

shadowwalker
10-04-2012, 11:15 PM
I was born and raised in the same rural town (3k) - born less than a mile from the family home where I grew up and moved back to a few years ago. I lived in a small city (80k) for 20 years and hated every minute of it, and have no liking at all for big cities. I've done a little traveling, mostly by car, and if I could move anywhere else, it would be the mountains of southern Idaho, northern Montana. I hate where I live in the winter - nothing but bare farm fields covered with snow, but love it the rest of the year. So I'd love to have a cabin in the mountains to hold up in during the winter, and come home for spring through fall. Ideally, I'd just have a motorhome and go where and when I wanted.

angeluscado
10-04-2012, 11:18 PM
I've lived in the same area for my whole life and have moved twice - once before I could remember and then three years ago to my current place. I love the location of my apartment - close to everywhere and a short bus ride to downtown/work. Hubby's work is about three blocks away and he walked to work until he got his license.

The only thing I don't like is how expensive my apartment is. Sure, we split the expenses, but sometimes just... Ugh.

Maze Runner
10-04-2012, 11:24 PM
I do. I live in Norfolk, in the UK, and for all my typically-british complaints about it, I love it. I live in the city, and it's a beautiful city with a lot of history. It's small enough to walk across in a day, but big enough to have all the important things, and it's safe and friendly. I am surrounded on all sides by miles of lush fenland and farmland, and I'm only an hours drive from the coast. And the sky. You've never seen sky like Norfolk sky. It's huge. Artists have always come here, just to paint our sky. It's especially wonderful at the coast.

I can imagine Norfolk is probably quite boring for people not as into books and old buildings as me, but they aren't proper people.

I have just bought a three bedroom maisonette right at the border between the city and a village that it grew into, a newish construction - build sometime in the seventies. It's clean and bright and gets sun all day, all year round. It's big enough for us... and for the family we plan to have soon.

If we have enough money when Jos retires, we'll retire to a nice cottage in one of the nearby villages. Far enough out to have lovely views, close enough to be convenient.

Sounds absolutely idyllic! Were you born and raised there? Also, what's "fenland"?

Mclesh
10-04-2012, 11:27 PM
Like angeluscado, I've lived in two places my whole life--the house I grew up in, then when I moved out and bought a place. Still there. And it's just across town. I didn't choose it because of its proximity to my mom's, more that it was affordable in Southern California. It's a fairly quiet neighborhood, small crimes, fairly safe. The thing I appreciate most about living here is the weather. Other than when it's too hot, our weather is mostly good. The winters are mild. We've had more than our share of humidity lately. Don't like that. But that seems to be over now.

I like the proximity of things. The old joke in L.A. is everything is 20 minutes away (except when you factor in the traffic).

If I could live anywhere, it would probably be at the beach--Laguna, Del Mar or Santa Barbara. (If I ever win the lottery and wake up wealthy.)

Maze Runner
10-04-2012, 11:31 PM
I live in Virginia.

With the exception of the horrible humidity in the summertime, I love it.

I live in a townhouse in the suburbs, but I work in the city (about a 40-minute commute).

I'm close to shopping, all kinds of cultural and historical stuff, very nice restaurants and there's a church on every corner.

I've traveled to other places, but I've lived here all my life, and at this point, I think I'll stay put. ;)

Home is a good thing, no denying it. But I guess it means more than just a geographical location. Been gone so long there's no going back.

Anninyn
10-04-2012, 11:34 PM
Sounds absolutely idyllic! Were you born and raised there? Also, what's "fenland"?

I was. I spent a few years living in a small town (very small) in the middle of nowhere, too.

Fens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fens). It's marshland, effectively. It means that cities and towns can;t spread too far, as you can't really build much more than the odd cottage on it. In spring and autumn mists will rise up from the fens very quickly - last winter the entirety of Norwich was covered in a mist so thick that buses were disappearing into it.

firedrake
10-04-2012, 11:36 PM
Nice to hear you liked Pittsburgh- it definitely ain't for everybody. I lived all around the city, East Liberty, Brookline, Downtown, spent a large part of my childhood, back and forth to Garfield, near the corner of Negley and Broad. I know it's bad now, wasn't all that great then, but I loved it. Very vivid memories of that area. What neighborhood, suburb did u live in?

S'liberty, eh? Been through there a few times. I believe I may have gotten very, very drunk and passed out at a party there. :D

I lived in Monroeville.


I do. I live in Norfolk, in the UK, and for all my typically-british complaints about it, I love it. I live in the city, and it's a beautiful city with a lot of history. It's small enough to walk across in a day, but big enough to have all the important things, and it's safe and friendly. I am surrounded on all sides by miles of lush fenland and farmland, and I'm only an hours drive from the coast. And the sky. You've never seen sky like Norfolk sky. It's huge. Artists have always come here, just to paint our sky. It's especially wonderful at the coast.

I can imagine Norfolk is probably quite boring for people not as into books and old buildings as me, but they aren't proper people.

I have just bought a three bedroom maisonette right at the border between the city and a village that it grew into, a newish construction - build sometime in the seventies. It's clean and bright and gets sun all day, all year round. It's big enough for us... and for the family we plan to have soon.

If we have enough money when Jos retires, we'll retire to a nice cottage in one of the nearby villages. Far enough out to have lovely views, close enough to be convenient.

Norfolk is one of the best kept secrets in the UK. I used to live in Suffolk and my job involved quite a few jaunts to Norfolk. I love it. Spent a memorable week at the University, when I worked at the Open University. They did the Summer School there. Good times. :D

Maze Runner
10-04-2012, 11:36 PM
Like angeluscado, I've lived in two places my whole life--the house I grew up in, then when I moved out and bought a place. Still there. And it's just across town. I didn't choose it because of its proximity to my mom's, more that it was affordable in Southern California. It's a fairly quiet neighborhood, small crimes, fairly safe. The thing I appreciate most about living here is the weather. Other than when it's too hot, our weather is mostly good. The winters are mild. We've had more than our share of humidity lately. Don't like that. But that seems to be over now.

I like the proximity of things. The old joke in L.A. is everything is 20 minutes away (except when you factor in the traffic).

If I could live anywhere, it would probably be at the beach--Laguna, Del Mar or Santa Barbara. (If I ever win the lottery and wake up wealthy.)

Yeah, I finally like it here. Took me a long time. The 20 minute thing, it's funny right? Especially when there's traffic and you can hit traffic any time of day. I love the beach, too. I'm one of those guys that's just a dot in the blue horizon when I'm in the surf. I lived in Venice for a while, a half a block from the boardwalk.

It's been a rough summer, you are right. But pretty soon here, we'll have about seven months before weather is even a consideration.

The distance between point A and B can be a drag. LA has everything NY has, only it can be so far out of reach you don't bother.

Maze Runner
10-04-2012, 11:38 PM
S'liberty, eh? Been through there a few times. I believe I may have gotten very, very drunk and passed out at a party there. :D

I lived in Monroeville.





I know, and you should have heard the things you said in your sleep.

Maze Runner
10-04-2012, 11:40 PM
I was. I spent a few years living in a small town (very small) in the middle of nowhere, too.

Fens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fens). It's marshland, effectively. It means that cities and towns can;t spread too far, as you can't really build much more than the odd cottage on it. In spring and autumn mists will rise up from the fens very quickly - last winter the entirety of Norwich was covered in a mist so thick that buses were disappearing into it.

So great when you love where you're from- 'taint always the case. You sound happy- nice to hear that kind of thing.

Maze Runner
10-04-2012, 11:44 PM
I was raised in the DC area, but I've lived in the Asheville, NC area for the last nine years. I absolutely love it there.

Meaning, not here- are you in NYC?

xKatya
10-04-2012, 11:47 PM
I lived in one place from birth through high school (but travelled quite a bit during that time), and then moved over 3000 miles to go to college. There was a point during college when I moved every six months for two years, because I studied abroad on two different continents. I racked up a pretty impressive amount of airline miles, too!

It's very hard for me to imagine staying in one place for more than a couple years, honestly, and I've spent enough time other places that I feel like I have trouble fitting in anywhere. (The number of times I've been told I don't seem like an American is slightly ridiculous)*. To further complicate things, my parents and extended family come from a very different part of the country than where I grew up, and I feel more out of place there than I do abroad. So it's a pretty complicated question for me. I'm back at "home" now but frustrated by the isolation and the fact it doesn't really feel like home anymore, and I'm hoping to move back east at some point, but committing to stay put anywhere is somewhat terrifying.

*To the point of being asked if I spoke English, when it was clear the expectation was I didn't...

Lavern08
10-04-2012, 11:53 PM
I suppose it really is true that "Home is Where Your Heart Is?" ;)

Mr Flibble
10-04-2012, 11:55 PM
I do. At the moment anyway

I live in a smallish town in Sussex - I was brought up in a tiny village a few miles away. I feel like I know everybody. Wherever I go there's someone I went to school with, or am related to. The local paper often has front page headlines that scream 'Tractor sheds haybales!' because that's the most excitement all week. If I look down my road, I can see hills and woods, I'm on the doorstep - a matter of a few minutes walk - of a really old forest with oodles of legends, in a town with bundles of cool history. Yet I can be anywhere in London or Brighton in under two hours if I feel the need (I don't all that often)


Sadly the council have recently decided to build an amount of houses as an addition that will, in effect, make the town 25% bigger. All in one go. Apparently we'll thank them for it later.....

Maze Runner
10-04-2012, 11:57 PM
I do. At the moment anyway

I live in a smallish town in Sussex - I was brought up in a tiny village a few miles away. I feel like I know everybody. Wherever I go there's someone I went to school with, or am related to. The local paper often has front page headlines that scream 'Tractor sheds haybales!' because that's the most excitement all week. If I look down my road, I can see hills and woods, I'm on the doorstep - a matter of a few minutes walk - of a really old forest with oodles of legends, in a town with bundles of cool history. Yet I can be anywhere in London or Brighton in under two hours if I feel the need (I don't all that often)


Sadly the council have recently decided to build an amount of houses as an addition that will, in effect, make the town 25% bigger. All in one go. Apparently we'll thank them for it later.....

Man, that sounds perfect. All but the bolded, I mean.

backslashbaby
10-05-2012, 12:08 AM
My parents were in the military right before they had me, so we still moved around a lot when I was child because it was in their blood at that point. Living in Chicago as a toddler to kindergarten affected my Southern accent to this day; folks in NC always ask where I am from.

Later, when Mom wanted to settle where they grew up in NC, we stayed put all through my high school years. In college years and in my 20's, I lived in relative's houses and on job assignments with my dad, so I got to have Costa Rican and Hungarian living experiences that I'll never forget.

My home base was still NC. More recently, I read for a degree at Oxford, so that did wonders for my wanderlust.

It's been long enough now (graduated in 2009) that I'm going stir crazy again :D

But I do love my little country cottage (that's right near the highway, so I'm not really in the boonies). It's very quick to get to two cities, so I'm near more things than when I lived here before. But the actual house is in the country, on acres. You can tell by the lack of mufflers that I'm in the country! That's my only regret -- the kind of noisy traffic that is around. Mufflers are your friend, people ;)

Scottish Writer
10-05-2012, 12:12 AM
So I live about an hour from Edinburgh. It's a small village of about about 1000 people. It's great living rural but I always venture into town (Edinburgh) for work etc. I am biased of course but Edinburgh is great city. Vibrant, picturesque and friendly. We love a celebration here whether its the month long Edinburgh festival or annual Hogmanay celebration.

The only thing I can complain about is the unpredictable weather here in the UK. All seasons are rolled into one.

Maze Runner
10-05-2012, 12:16 AM
My parents were in the military right before they had me, so we still moved around a lot when I was child because it was in their blood at that point. Living in Chicago as a toddler to kindergarten affected my Southern accent to this day; folks in NC always ask where I am from.

Later, when Mom wanted to settle where they grew up in NC, we stayed put all through my high school years. In college years and in my 20's, I lived in relative's houses and on job assignments with my dad, so I got to have Costa Rican and Hungarian living experiences that I'll never forget.

My home base was still NC. More recently, I read for a degree at Oxford, so that did wonders for my wanderlust.

It's been long enough now (graduated in 2009) that I'm going stir crazy again :D

But I do love my little country cottage (that's right near the highway, so I'm not really in the boonies). It's very quick to get to two cities, so I'm near more things than when I lived here before. But the actual house is in the country, on acres. You can tell by the lack of mufflers that I'm in the country! That's my only regret -- the kind of noisy traffic that is around. Mufflers are your friend, people ;)

Pretty interesting upbringing you had. My brother just married a girl from Budapest. He's been there a few times- sounds thick with atmosphere.

So, in the country they don't have a muffler requirement? Or they just don't enforce it? What does it mean, to read for a degree at Oxford?

Maze Runner
10-05-2012, 12:26 AM
So I live about an hour from Edinburgh. It's a small village of about about 1000 people. It's great living rural but I always venture into town (Edinburgh) for work etc. I am biased of course but Edinburgh is great city. Vibrant, picturesque and friendly. We love a celebration here whether its the month long Edinburgh festival or annual Hogmanay celebration.

The only thing I can complain about is the unpredictable weather here in the UK. All seasons are rolled into one.

In LA we have the opposite problem. Weather is so monotonous here, especially in the summer, it's surreal. This summer we got rain, once, and it was a big occasion. I ran outside and stood in it for the twenty minutes or so that it lasted, just staring up at the sky.

And then, in the winter, when it does rain it won't stop. It's like a biblical prophecy.

Hiroko
10-05-2012, 12:26 AM
I live just outside New Orleans, Louisiana, right now. I like the food and the culture, but I greatly dislike the half-year hurricane season.

LadyV
10-05-2012, 01:35 AM
Born and raised in Pittsburgh. I love it here. We have such a unique culture and the landscape is beautiful, if you like hills. My neighborhood is right in the city but is very suburban-like and relatively quiet. Dowtown is only minutes away. It's also surrounded by a lot of woods, so we get our share of wildlife, everything from deer to turkeys.

backslashbaby
10-05-2012, 01:47 AM
Pretty interesting upbringing you had. My brother just married a girl from Budapest. He's been there a few times- sounds thick with atmosphere.

So, in the country they don't have a muffler requirement? Or they just don't enforce it? What does it mean, to read for a degree at Oxford?

Budapest is wonderful! That's where I lived on the weekends.

They just don't enforce the muffler requirement out here in the country. And we get a whole lot more motorcycle traffic, too.

For some reason, getting a degree at Oxford is called reading for one. Folks ask 'What do you read?' instead of 'What is your major?' like in the States. It's a very old school with its own ways of doing things is the reason, I guess. Its age is one of the huge reasons I wanted to go there so badly. In my undergrad school in the States, my class was only the 222nd graduating class ;) Older than the nation but just a baby compared to Oxford :)

Ken
10-05-2012, 02:10 AM
... haven't really been comfortable anywhere. always feel like an outsider or intruder wherever I've lived. one place is pretty much the same as any other place as such. just once, I'd like to experience what it's like to feel like I belong somewhere. maybe that's not really possible. maybe people just pretend like it is. darned good job if so. got me convinced.

Maze Runner
10-05-2012, 02:17 AM
Born and raised in Pittsburgh. I love it here. We have such a unique culture and the landscape is beautiful, if you like hills. My neighborhood is right in the city but is very suburban-like and relatively quiet. Dowtown is only minutes away. It's also surrounded by a lot of woods, so we get our share of wildlife, everything from deer to turkeys.

You know, a friend of mine, a native Californian, just came back living in Pgh for the past year. I haven't been back in a while, so imagine my shock when he told me of the deer "problem". I heard they're even culling them in Mt. Lebanon now. I understand now that it's because of all the construction that's going on outside the city that has forced the deer into town.

I think I am homesick

Maze Runner
10-05-2012, 02:18 AM
Budapest is wonderful! That's where I lived on the weekends.

They just don't enforce the muffler requirement out here in the country. And we get a whole lot more motorcycle traffic, too.

For some reason, getting a degree at Oxford is called reading for one. Folks ask 'What do you read?' instead of 'What is your major?' like in the States. It's a very old school with its own ways of doing things is the reason, I guess. Its age is one of the huge reasons I wanted to go there so badly. In my undergrad school in the States, my class was only the 222nd graduating class ;) Older than the nation but just a baby compared to Oxford :)

I'm so impressed with that. Wow!

Maze Runner
10-05-2012, 02:23 AM
... haven't really been comfortable anywhere. always feel like an outsider or intruder wherever I've lived. one place is pretty much the same as any other place as such. just once, I'd like to experience what it's like to feel like I belong somewhere. maybe that's not really possible. maybe people just pretend like it is. darned good job if so. got me convinced.

I don't know, Ken- you come off as such a nice guy on here- we've been buddies since day one! Maybe you're shy? I donno, man, I can be shy too. What part of the country were you raised in?

Gen Turner
10-05-2012, 02:37 AM
I love where I live. My family's been in this general area for over a century now (a long time by California standards) so it's also got a lot of personal history for me. As I like to say, we have a glorious three-acre dirt farm.

My husband and I plan to never move again. The kids can just use the tractor backhoe to bury us out back.

Speed Racer
10-05-2012, 02:43 AM
Born and raised in a northern suburb of Chicago and moved to L.A. when I was 19. (Van Halen's California Girls made me move). I love L.A but hate traffic. There used to be a thing called drive against traffic, no more. I love the fact I can go snowboarding in the mountains in the morning, and surfing in the late afternoon, all in the same day. And though I am happily married, theres still nothing like those California girls!

EMaree
10-05-2012, 03:08 AM
I do. I live in Norfolk, in the UK, and for all my typically-british complaints about it, I love it. I live in the city, and it's a beautiful city with a lot of history. It's small enough to walk across in a day, but big enough to have all the important things, and it's safe and friendly. I am surrounded on all sides by miles of lush fenland and farmland, and I'm only an hours drive from the coast. And the sky. You've never seen sky like Norfolk sky. It's huge. Artists have always come here, just to paint our sky. It's especially wonderful at the coast.


Oh wow, that sounds amazing. I'm from a coastal town and we get some spectacular starlit nights too, it's breathtaking stuff. And staring up at those open heavens is my miracle cure for writers block and worries.


I was. I spent a few years living in a small town (very small) in the middle of nowhere, too.

Fens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fens). In spring and autumn mists will rise up from the fens very quickly - last winter the entirety of Norwich was covered in a mist so thick that buses were disappearing into it.

That sounds like such a fantastic setting for a fantasy or horror novel. :D


I am biased of course but Edinburgh is great city. Vibrant, picturesque and friendly. We love a celebration here whether its the month long Edinburgh festival or annual Hogmanay celebration.

Edinburgh's one of the few other places in the UK I want to live in. It's such a wonderful city.

Komnena
10-05-2012, 04:16 AM
I like where I live, although I wouldn't mind moving into the heart of horse country. My roots go pretty deep into the soil here. About the only other place I've seen that could be home was Colorado.

LJD
10-05-2012, 04:54 AM
I live in Toronto. I like it, except for how time-consuming transportation can be. I was brought up in the suburbs (20-30 min drive from where I live now). Except for university, I've lived in the Toronto area my whole life, and my family is all here.

Silver King
10-05-2012, 06:30 AM
I changed u to you, twice, in this thread title.

Damn, that felt good. I could live here forever...

LadyVonFright
10-05-2012, 06:22 PM
I was born and raised in Toronto, Ontario...do I like it...absolutely not. I can't stand the snotty people, I hate the winters, and seeing as construction season is in the summer...not only do we get humidity (which I have learned to love because beggers can't be choosers) but when construction dust mixes with humid smog ... you feel like the dirt just sticks to your skin.
Getting to work on the subway is no walk in the park either, the atmosphere is so rushed. Our Transportation system keeps raising prices so taking public transit is infuriating. Driving is no better with parking prices through the roof not to mention all the traffic. Walking to work is not an option because paying rent close to work is apparently for millionaires.
Jeez, am I bitter about Toronto? lol
I need to move somewhere hot year round, not so populated, yet populated enough so I don't feel lonely...where finding work isn't too hard and cheap to live...so it looks like I'm staying put because I don't think it exists ;)

heyjude
10-05-2012, 06:29 PM
I lived in Monroeville.

Me too, for a very long time. I wonder if our paths ever crossed? What a small world.

We moved three years ago to FL and I'm not budging, ever, until the world ends. I love it here. Pgh was not my favorite place to live.

mccardey
10-05-2012, 06:32 PM
My home is in Australia (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hV78XFdBTsk&feature=related) and I love it - but I've lived in a few places over the years.

Currently living in the South of France. :heart: What's not to like?


ETA: Oh - Tenterfield Saddler linky (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMauNjr7_ZE). Just coz.

Xelebes
10-05-2012, 06:34 PM
I've lived in at least a city, a town, and a Mennonite village.

I like where I live now in the city. I just need my own place.

stormie
10-05-2012, 06:36 PM
I live in a quiet small town in New Jersey, ocean three blocks away, a lake in the middle, a cute four block "downtown." An hour's drive from NYC or Philadelphia. I was born and raised here and love it. Contrary to what people think about NJ, it is not all Snookieville with tough-acting people. NJ has many rural areas. Pine barrens from where I live and to the south, hills and farms in the northwest.

As for a certain neighbor I live near, he's a major nuisance, but there are people like that practically anywhere. Right? Right?!

Maze Runner
10-05-2012, 08:23 PM
I live in a quiet small town in New Jersey, ocean three blocks away, a lake in the middle, a cute four block "downtown." An hour's drive from NYC or Philadelphia. I was born and raised here and love it. Contrary to what people think about NJ, it is not all Snookieville with tough-acting people. NJ has many rural areas. Pine barrens from where I live and to the south, hills and farms in the northwest.

As for a certain neighbor I live near, he's a major nuisance, but there are people like that practically anywhere. Right? Right?!

The Pine Barrens nearly did in Paul Walnuts!

stormie
10-05-2012, 10:28 PM
The Pine Barrens nearly did in Paul Walnuts!
:ROFL: Maybe I'll send my neighbor a little farther south, where it's like no-man's land (as shown in Sopranos). "Turn at the old oak tree. No, the OLD oak tree. Yep, that's the one. Then at the fork in that there road where the feed 'n seed store is, bear left."

Went to a wedding that was deep in the Pine Barrens. No street signs, just what I said above. Swear. The church was built in the early 1800s and only painted from time to time. The reception was at a bar that happened to have a large room added on for parties. In our suits and dresses, we had to traipse through the bar where the locals were sitting wearing their hunting gear. It was dark when we left the place and had to peer into the pitch dark--no streetlamps of course, and only a few houses every mile or so--to get home. And of course, my GPS was from 2000 but that wouldn't have helped anyway. It's 1 million acres of another world.

We should have rented a camper and stayed awhile.

Maze Runner
10-05-2012, 11:53 PM
:ROFL: Maybe I'll send my neighbor a little farther south, where it's like no-man's land (as shown in Sopranos). "Turn at the old oak tree. No, the OLD oak tree. Yep, that's the one. Then at the fork in that there road where the feed 'n seed store is, bear left."

Went to a wedding that was deep in the Pine Barrens. No street signs, just what I said above. Swear. The church was built in the early 1800s and only painted from time to time. The reception was at a bar that happened to have a large room added on for parties. In our suits and dresses, we had to traipse through the bar where the locals were sitting wearing their hunting gear. It was dark when we left the place and had to peer into the pitch dark--no streetlamps of course, and only a few houses every mile or so--to get home. And of course, my GPS was from 2000 but that wouldn't have helped anyway. It's 1 million acres of another world.

We should have rented a camper and stayed awhile.

I may have already told you this, but I spent a lot of time in So. Jersey. For a kid who grew up landlocked, it was like Freedom at last! I spent a whole summer in Wildwood one year while I was in college. So much fun.

You know, I think maybe Paulie Walnuts could talk some sense into your neighbors. If not him, then at least Silvio Dante, the reasonable one. Not to make light of it, inconsiderate neighbors are one of the blights on the social balance. I had one of those nervous little yelping dogs behind me for way too long. A single mother and her two sons, so I tried to be as gentle as possible, but kindness only works on those who appreciate the gesture. It finally improved when I reluctantly had to inform her that I was one sleepless night from calling Animal Protection. What she didn't know was that I probably never would have had the heart to do it.

You grew up around there, right? Maybe you have the best of both worlds? Kind of rural, close to the water, close to Philly and NY.

Ken
10-06-2012, 01:08 AM
I don't know, Ken- you come off as such a nice guy on here- we've been buddies since day one! Maybe you're shy? I donno, man, I can be shy too. What part of the country were you raised in?

... thanks buddy. Appreciate the kind words. Guess I was just in a grumpy mood yesterday. Work related. That and shyness too. Always have been. I'm from San Francisco, originally. Neat town.

Maze Runner
10-06-2012, 02:02 AM
... thanks buddy. Appreciate the kind words. Guess I was just in a grumpy mood yesterday. Work related. That and shyness too. Always have been. I'm from San Francisco, originally. Neat town.

Hey, it's not like I can't relate. High highs and low lows. Always been that way. Choose the light, any way, any time you can.

Cliff Face
10-06-2012, 03:46 AM
I've lived in the same State of Australia my whole life: South Australia. Adelaide is the city here, which is pretty much a 1-mile square with some dense suburbs around it, then the rest of "Adelaide" is a HUGE sprawling amount of suburbs.

I lived from 0-5 in Seaford, down in the south. Then out in the country, next to an award-winning wine region from 5-15. 15-19 was further north, though still south of the city, near where I went to High School.

Then further north again living with friends (in 2 suburbs over 3 years), but still well south of the actual city. From about 23-24 I was back near where I went to school.

Then we moved south... Not as far as Seaford or the country region, but close. Was there for about 3 years (in 2 houses), and now I'm back in... Seaford.

So yeah, I've moved a fair bit, but always in the south of Adelaide. It's been 13 years since I even left the state.

I don't really like it here that much. There are ups and downs...

It's hot all the time (I want snow damn it!) and it's the drug capital of Australia, so a lot of people are out of their minds on drugs. But then, it's a cheap place to live with good air. The water is tainted, so that's a minus, and there's virtually nothing to do nearby.

I'd rather live somewhere else, if I had the money.

Both my siblings have lived overseas before, and travel a lot. In fact, I'm the only person in my family who isn't always travelling...

When I'm a rich and famous writer, I'll put their wanderlust to shame! 6 countries, 2 months each, no known address for a whole year. That sounds pretty good to me!

ConnieJ
10-06-2012, 09:18 AM
I've lived in Southern California my entire life. I grew up in the small town of La Verne until I moved out at 20 for college. I lived in Long Beach and loved living in a big, diverse city--very different from the town I grew up in. After college, I moved to Upland. Now I live in Rancho Cucamonga. I really like this city--great schools, low crime, I work nearby, lots to do in the area, etc.

Sunwords
10-06-2012, 10:20 AM
I did not like to live where I lived (Germany), so I moved. Now, I love living in Amman. The city is not too big but big enough to have nearly everything you need, only setback is the lack of seaside. Five hours drive to Aqaba are a little bit much, but Aqaba all year would be way too hot.

stormie
10-06-2012, 05:28 PM
You grew up around there, right? Maybe you have the best of both worlds? Kind of rural, close to the water, close to Philly and NY.

Yep. That's what I like about NJ. Not a far ride to any place.

backslashbaby
10-06-2012, 07:20 PM
I did not like to live where I lived (Germany), so I moved. Now, I love living in Amman. The city is not too big but big enough to have nearly everything you need, only setback is the lack of seaside. Five hours drive to Aqaba are a little bit much, but Aqaba all year would be way too hot.

I'd like to live closer to the beach, too! There is that. I live closer to the mountains right now, which I also like (especially for winter things). The beach is a five hours' drive for me, too.

I wouldn't like to actually live in our mountains or at the beach because of weather. Too many dangerous icy roads on one hand, or hurricanes on the other.

Chris P
10-06-2012, 07:31 PM
My favorite place I've lived so far was Ashland, Wisconsin, way the devil up north on Lake Superior. I was only there for two years during college. Otherwise, I was in Iowa until I was 30, and it was fine, there just isn't much there for me now that my parents have moved to Michigan. Mississippi had nice winters, but I never fit in there, and the last of my 11 years there was pretty painful. Now, I'm in Uganda, way the devil down by the equator on Lake Victoria. I'm liking it here so far, but I will be ready to move on when my appointment here is over in two years.

England, hold on to your hat cuz as God is my witness I'm living there next! (if someone hires me. Please, someone hire me)

BeatrixKiddo
10-06-2012, 10:22 PM
Were you were born and raised there? Have you moved around a lot in your life? What do you like, dislike about where you live? If it's rural, would u like to live in a city? Vice Versa? Are you dug in or looking for a door? Why do I ask? Eh, I'm a, just a guy who used to travel a lot, who's lived in different parts of the US, and now that I'm kind of in lock down, I miss it. Besides, I'm eh, just curious.


I'd be curious to know which areas you liked best. I'd like to move again one day. I grew up in Georgia (which I miss) and have been in Illinois the past two decades (which is "ok" but I hate the winters up here).

I'd move back South or somewhere warm if I could.

Which towns, areas, did you enjoy living in the most (if they were in the US) ?

druid12000
10-06-2012, 10:38 PM
I suppose it really is true that "Home is Where Your Heart Is?" ;)

Too true!
I've travelled a bit and lived in various places around the US, even a few months in Australia, but I grew up in Nova Scotia and that is the only place I have ever considered home.
Currently living in NH which is nice but I am trying to move back to NS.

Maze Runner
10-06-2012, 10:56 PM
I'd be curious to know which areas you liked best. I'd like to move again one day. I grew up in Georgia (which I miss) and have been in Illinois the past two decades (which is "ok" but I hate the winters up here).

I'd move back South or somewhere warm if I could.

Which towns, areas, did you enjoy living in the most (if they were in the US) ?

New York, hands down. I like LA a lot- it took me a while. I love the attitude of CA people in general- there's just something that feels a little freer out here- so much about live and let live. But I love city life. LA is not so much a city, as it is a patchwork of small towns connected by freeways. I hate having to get into my car for everything. And I miss the drastic change of seasons. Winter never bothered me. My friends used to joke with me about it. Everybody would be all bundled up on a Winter night, and I'd be in a light leather jacket, V-neck sweater with no shirt or T-shirt underneath, never owned a pair of thermal underwear for the whole time I grew up in PA. I did ruin quite a few pair of Italian loafers in the salty snow, though. You know, when you wake up the next day and there are white stripes on your shoes that you can never get out.

KellyAssauer
10-07-2012, 12:27 AM
Were you were born and raised there?

No.



What do you like

It's mostly free of earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes and fruitcakes.



What do you dislike about where you live?

It's Pennsylvania.
The educated electorate ain't, and It's too dang cold.



If it's rural, would u like to live in a city?

I cannot politely give you an opinion about how I feel about cities and the people who live in them.



Are you dug in or looking for a door?

Dug in, but I'd consider France.

Siri Kirpal
10-07-2012, 03:22 AM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Conceived in Chicago, born in Elmira NY, raised in San Diego, two years at UC Santa Cruz, 30 years in Salem OR. Now living in Eugene OR, and except for UC Santa Cruz, it's the best. We live in the hills at the south end of town in forest with deer and turkeys wandering by. I once or twice have seen a pileated woodpecker on one of our firs. World class Bach Festival in summer (with other composers too). Seasons, but not excruciating.

Interesting to read where everyone lives and what you like and don't like.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

ConnieJ
10-07-2012, 07:25 AM
It would be interesting to see everyone's placement on a map!

Cliff Face
10-07-2012, 07:39 AM
Mine's easy. Find a globe. Look South. Yes, there's Australia, hiding. Look South-middle of Australia. That's my state. Look South of the state. That's where I am.

:tongue

Easy enough directions to follow, right? South, then South, then South some more.

backslashbaby
10-07-2012, 10:25 PM
I always tell people to imagine the top of Florida and then DC. I'm in the middle of that on the east coast. Then the middle of that state (basically).

I'm always surprised how many non-USians don't know where DC is, though :D

Cliff Face
10-08-2012, 02:19 AM
I have no knowledge of American state configurations. Except that New York is diagonally opposite Los Angeles. Right?

And I only learned that because sis went there for a holiday.

buz
10-08-2012, 03:29 AM
I've been here almost forever (except college). I wanna get out. :D

There's nothing wrong with it. It's just very...bland. I'm bored. Have been, for a while.

But no luck finding a means of sustaining myself elsewhere, so far...people keep offering me jobs here and...(life rant censored)

I also keep blowing all my money to leave the country. My desire to run away cannot be contained, apparently. But then I run out of money and have to come back...

It's quite a stupid cycle, really.

But I wouldn't trade any of those times out of the country for the money it cost...

The idea of living in a large city makes me nervous. ...

Cliff Face
10-08-2012, 03:56 AM
This thread prompted me to mention elsewhere on AW how I'd love to live in Italy for a while. So someone linked me to a site for studying in Italy...

It seemed promising, until I realised it'd cost $12-15k for 3 months. Eep! I soooo can't afford that!

One day I'll make it over there... Just probably not anytime soon.

I_love_coffee
10-09-2012, 07:48 PM
I was born, raised and went to college and grad school in Philadelphia, PA (for those outside the US, its a very large city about 90 miles south of NYC). I was glad to leave at age 26.

I live in south Jersey (NJ) now, with my husband and kids. Its a nice town about 30 minutes from Philadelphia, 1 hour from the beaches. We live in a woodsy lake community on the edge of town, I can see the lake from the back of my house. In the summer we fish and swim and canoe in the lake, and in the winter the lake freezes and the kids play pond hockey. The schools are top notch, the crime is low. Its a nice town to raise kids in. The downside is we have very high real estate taxes.

My husband would love to move down south, North Carolina or South Carolina ( warmer weather and lower cost of living), but our jobs are here and we don't want to uproot our kids (ages 12 and 16), so here we will stay for the time being....

I would love to live somewhere else though. I like my town but I would also like to try living somewhere else. I hate cities and like to be where people are more laidback and down to earth. I think I would like the midwest or the pacific northwest. That town in the UK, Norwalk? or Norfolk? sounds really nice.

I wish I had the money to just pick up and live wherever would suit me best :)))

I_love_coffee
10-09-2012, 08:02 PM
... haven't really been comfortable anywhere. always feel like an outsider or intruder wherever I've lived. one place is pretty much the same as any other place as such. just once, I'd like to experience what it's like to feel like I belong somewhere. maybe that's not really possible. maybe people just pretend like it is. darned good job if so. got me convinced.



I know what you mean, I feel like this too some days. One of my characters went through this feeling as well, he traveled all over looking to find his "true sense of home" (i love that theme!!!!) and returned home to where he had grown up to discover that you carry this feeling within you, doesn't matter where you live....

KawaiiTimes
10-24-2012, 09:25 AM
I grew up less than five miles from here. I went wild after high school and moved thousands of miles away (a couple of times) chasing dreams, then realized that "here" is the only place that felt like home. Now I could walk from my office to my childhood home if the desire ever struck to do such a thing.

Edited to add, I am in the Portland Oregon area.

CJJBadger
10-24-2012, 10:38 AM
I'm French but lived most of my life in London (with a quick year in Sweden before that when I was a wee nipper - LOADS of snow in winter and darkness most of the day...)

For the last year and a half I've lived in Hong Kong with my husband and am loving it! I was desperate to move here to get away from London, more because I needed a change than anything else. It was definitely the right decision, I got a new job out here which isn't soul destroying and allows me time to write so just from that point of view it's been awesome!

But I do miss London more so that I would have thought and in a few years we'll definitely be going back....I think no matter how amazing a place is, after a while you need to get back to your roots and where you're from!

(Although the fact that it's almost November but still sunny and warm enough not to need any form of jumper/cardigan etc is a BIG plus!!)

T J Deen
10-24-2012, 10:59 AM
I'm up here in New York City. I hear a major portion of the novel publishing world is also somewhere in this city along with like 80% of the agents everyone's querying.

I grew up here. Only moved away for 4 years when i was 18 to join the military. It was mostly North Carolina and Okinawa during those years.

I honestly tried not to come back here after the military but things didn't work out and now I'll probably be here for another 15 years at least since I'm already paying into a 20 year pension plan with my job.

BlackMug
10-24-2012, 11:18 AM
Were you were born and raised there? Have you moved around a lot in your life? What do you like, dislike about where you live? If it's rural, would u like to live in a city? Vice Versa? Are you dug in or looking for a door? Why do I ask? Eh, I'm a, just a guy who used to travel a lot, who's lived in different parts of the US, and now that I'm kind of in lock down, I miss it. Besides, I'm eh, just curious.

I was born in London; I have been living there since my childhood. But now I like to live in a rural area, because there is fresh breeze and I like to see a green environment.

French Maiden
10-24-2012, 11:57 AM
I quite enjoy where I live.
No, I was born in Wagin, Western Australia.
I've moved around quite a bit, lived in Dumbleyung for the first 7 years of my life, then to Waroona for just over a year, then on to Mandurah for 4 years, to Pinjarra for another 7 years, then after my first son was born back to Waroona for 4 years, to Perth for a year (not by choice) and now I've been back in Mandurah for nearly 2 years.

I love how close it is to everything. I dont drive, I love having everything at my fingertips. I dont like that it's a big city and I dont have my family around me, I get frightned sometimes.
It's a city but it has rural all around it.

Cliff Face
10-24-2012, 12:05 PM
I wouldn't mind visiting Perth for a while... I know bugger all about Western Australia, never been there, but it's meant to have a really nice climate, or so I've heard.

*adds Perth to list of places to visit*

I figure it'll take me about 20 years to visit everywhere I want to go... And I have just enough money to go to Melbourne (the closest city not my own) for a weekend. Ack!

DragonHeart
10-24-2012, 04:30 PM
I was just thinking to myself the other day how for all its faults, I like living where I do. I grew up one town over and moved half a dozen times in the period between 1998 and 2001 when my parents divorced before settling here. It's a pretty small town, about 7,000 people.

Boston's an hour to the south so we're not completely in the boonies, hah. Wish they would agree to put a train station here; the tracks go right through the middle of town and the T goes to the station in the small city just south of us as it is. Already have a mostly unused parking lot right next to the tracks within walking distance of my house.

I do like the balance. The city is still quite accessible but we're just far enough north so that even being a major travel corridor (Route 125), things are pretty quiet most of the time. I like being in urban areas, I just don't think I could handle living there. Though I did really like my friend's old apartment in Somerville, it seemed like a nice compromise. I do not desire to ever live in the state of Massachusetts, though.

I_love_coffee
10-24-2012, 05:29 PM
I live in a quiet small town in New Jersey, ocean three blocks away, a lake in the middle, a cute four block "downtown." An hour's drive from NYC or Philadelphia. I was born and raised here and love it. Contrary to what people think about NJ, it is not all Snookieville with tough-acting people. NJ has many rural areas. Pine barrens from where I live and to the south, hills and farms in the northwest.

As for a certain neighbor I live near, he's a major nuisance, but there are people like that practically anywhere. Right? Right?!

NJ is like 3 different states, you have North Jersey, home of the Sopranos, etc where ,people are more likely to be Devils fans, or Giants fans. Its more like a suburb of NYC up there. Then you have South Jersey, more like a suburb of Philly, where we are FLYERS and Eagles fans (philly teams). A ton of the players all live in the south jersey area too. Then you have the SHORE. But even the shore towns all have their different vibes. There are the towns above Atlantic City that are frequented more by North Jersey and NYC and then you have your towns below AC which is frequented more by South Jersey, Philly peeps.

How was it growing up and living at the shore Year round Stormie?

stormie
10-24-2012, 05:47 PM
How was it growing up and living at the shore Year round Stormie?
Wonderful! We had instant friends in the summer, from the renters and the people staying in the hotels. From September to May it was quiet but we had the whole town to ourselves, to walk down the middle of the street and encounter no cars, ride our bikes on the boardwalk, or go to school where the windows were open and we could breathe the salty air and hear the seagulls.

It's still pretty much the same.