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Amadan
09-30-2012, 06:28 AM
So, I just gave a book a two star rating on Audible.com, and got this message:


Hmm... only 2 stars for Necropolis?

Sorry to hear you didn't like this book. Did you know that Audible Members can return books they're not happy with? Click here to return Necropolis



Now, on the one hand I was tempted to take them up on their offer, because hey, free credit! Get another book with it.

On the other hand, it's never occurred to me that I should return a book for a refund because I didn't like it.

I guess it makes sense. You can return any other product you decide you are dissatisfied with. It makes sense for Audible to take the "risk" out of choosing a book one might decide was a mistake.

But I've always figured, if I read a book all the way through to the end (and I very rarely DNF a book, no matter how horrible) I got what I paid my money for: a reading experience. Books don't come with a guarantee that every reader will love them.

Dunno, I am still pondering this one.

(I doubt I will "return" the book, though; instead I shall just leave my negative review up. :P)

Medievalist
09-30-2012, 06:33 AM
But I've always figured, if I read a book all the way through to the end (and I very rarely DNF a book, no matter how horrible) I got what I paid my money for: a reading experience. Books don't come with a guarantee that every reader will love them.

I've returned books because of printing flaws—major ones, like missing chapters or repeated chapters and missing text, or garbled pages.

And I've returned digital books (text and audio) for major production flaws.

But not liking a book isn't a reason, for my part.

Little Red Barn
09-30-2012, 06:47 AM
i've never returned a book. nor will i ever. imo they should never be returned because someone didn't like it--get it--whatever. it's tacky. returning/exchanging because it is damaged, is acceptable.

Susan Littlefield
09-30-2012, 06:49 AM
I've never returned a book for not liking it, but I have returned it if there are physical flaws to it. I once bought a book from a book club that had missing pages with a note to "insert the pages <between certain parts>, and I returned it for credit. Once my terms were fulfilled, I quit the book club.

dolores haze
09-30-2012, 06:50 AM
The only time I return a book is when I return a book to the library. I pay the late fee without complaining, too.

Kerosene
09-30-2012, 06:50 AM
I've never returned a book. For all the reasons, and I make sure I really want it before I buy it. Yes, I sit there and read and evaluate if I want to keep reading. I've blown through half a book before I placed it back.


But I mostly have to question the returns of audiobooks. They are expensive, so I would expect that the Audiable to be more appreciative towards returns. And, it's credit, they didn't lose your business, right?

BenPanced
09-30-2012, 07:11 AM
I've returned books twice, but only because I already had them. Otherwise, I've just donated unwanted books to the United Way book drive at work.

DancingMaenid
09-30-2012, 07:20 AM
I can understand returning books because of things like printing errors. In that case, it's a problem with the product and you're not getting what you paid for.

I've personally only returned books because I already own a copy, which I also think is reasonable.

But I can't imagine returning a book because I didn't like it. The way I see it, when I buy a book, I'm paying for the copy of the book (paper or digital) but also, in a less tangible sense, I'm paying for the reading experience. There's no guarantee that I'll like it.

Gen Turner
09-30-2012, 08:21 AM
I would never return a book just because I didn't like it, since taste is so subjective. (And I'm picky.) But then again, I hardly ever return anything. I figure if I don't like something, it's my own fault for judging poorly.
For books, I'll just donate them to the library bookstore, so that they can profit off of my mistakes.

MJNL
09-30-2012, 08:34 AM
I only return faulty products. Returning a book simply because I didn't like it is kind of like returning a board game because it wasn't as fun as I thought it'd be, or a box of crackers because the new flavor isn't to my liking--which is silly to me. Now if the book is missing chapters, the game is missing pieces, or I find a finger in the cracker box, that's another matter.

LJD
09-30-2012, 08:35 AM
I, too, would not return a book because I did not like it.

jjdebenedictis
09-30-2012, 09:14 AM
I would consider returning a book only if it was flamingly, horrifically bad. Like, "OMG, GIVE ME THOSE HOURS OF MY LIFE BACK!" bad.

And given I wouldn't likely finish a book that terrible--or buy it in the first place, given you can judge some things beforehand--I'm not sure this would ever realistically happen.

I'd be more likely to demand my money back for a movie I hated sufficiently, and I haven't done that thus far either.

crunchyblanket
09-30-2012, 12:15 PM
Even if the book was eye-bleedingly bad, I don't see the point in returning it. I'd just give it to the local charity shop.

shaldna
09-30-2012, 01:05 PM
I've returned books because of printing flaws—major ones, like missing chapters or repeated chapters and missing text, or garbles pages.

And I've returned digital books (text and audio) for major production flaws.

But not liking a book isn't a reason, for my part.

I don't know. I mean, publishing is a business like any other. Books are a product like any other. If I bought a dress and the seams weren't straight, or I got it home and found that it had a hole in it, I'd return it. I think most folk would.

BUT, if you got that dress home, had a better look at it and then decided that you didn't really like it after all, you might return it.

Why should books be different?

On one hand books, like most entertainment, is consumed by the mere act of observation. So although you will still have the physical item, you will have consumed all of the worth that you, as an individual, can get from it. In a sense, you've used it up and returning the book means that you still retain the contents of the book, while giving up only the physical copy.

On the other hand, what if you have a particular writer that, over the course of time, has written to a certain standard, leading you, as the reader, to invest significant time and money on them. They have a new book out and because of their previous work, you have a certain level of expectation, a standard that they have created for themselves. But what if the next book is complete shite? The reader has paid money based on an expectation of quality derived from previous experiences, but has been let down significantly. Is the reader then entitled to a refund?

It's an interesting thought.

seun
09-30-2012, 02:36 PM
Would it be expected (or accepted) for someone to return a CD or dvd because they didn't like it?

I wouldn't return a book. I'd put it down to just one of those things, give the book away and probably avoid the author in future.

Katrina S. Forest
09-30-2012, 03:06 PM
I've returned one book on Audible. I'd enjoyed the author before, so I just grabbed it without listening to a preview or reading the reviews. An hour into the book, absolutely nothing had happened. I gave up and counted it as a wasted credit.

I had another book that I got a while ago on Audible that I would return if I could. It might be great, but it's in Spanish. I thought I'd understand enough to follow the story, but I overestimated my listening skills and again, gave up after an hour.

I guess that's my measurement -- if I didn't get very far in the book before I gave up, I don't mind returning it. Had I previewed these two books more carefully, I probably wouldn't have bought them in the first place. I think that's fair.

LindaJeanne
09-30-2012, 05:12 PM
There is one book I would have returned if I had realized soon enough that Amazon allowed the return of e-books. It was a book on a medical subject, and it turned out to be pure snake-oil-salesman sensationalism (This is the one true solution for everyone that the medical industry insists on ignoring! Don't listen to your doctor, listen to me!) But that's because I felt mis-led as to what I was buying (and feared that the book could be actively harmful to others if they took it seriously)

Oh, and I returned one used book I purchased online, because I received a different edition than what was advertised (on a highly technical subject where the ten years between editions rendered the earlier one useless). This was an honest mistake on the seller's part (the publisher erroneously gave the same ISBN to both editions, and the seller didn't notice that when he entered the ISBN, Amazon filled out the information for a different edition than what he had. Which explains why the price was more in line with other copies of the 2nd edition than with used copies of the 3rd. He was very apologetic when I contacted him about the mistake.)

I've never returned a book because I didn't like it. I've just written it off as a bad purchasing decision and threw it in the donation box (or deleted it from my Kindle, depending). Maybe I should have returned the ones I gave up on early, but I'll probably stick to my current way of doing things.

Rhoda Nightingale
09-30-2012, 05:16 PM
The only time I return a book is when I return a book to the library. I pay the late fee without complaining, too.
Yeah, this. Or I donate them to used book stores or rummage sales. Returning them to the retailer? Because I didn't like them? Nope. Never entered my head as a possibility.

ChaosTitan
09-30-2012, 05:50 PM
I don't know. I mean, publishing is a business like any other. Books are a product like any other. If I bought a dress and the seams weren't straight, or I got it home and found that it had a hole in it, I'd return it. I think most folk would.

BUT, if you got that dress home, had a better look at it and then decided that you didn't really like it after all, you might return it.

Why should books be different?

To me, reading/listening to an entire book and then returning it after the fact is equivalent to buying a dress for a party, tucking in the tag, wearing, and then returning it the next day. You've basically "rented" the item, gotten your use out of it, and then went and got your money back. As someone who works in retail, I hate this. Maybe you had a great time at the party, maybe you had a terrible time at the party--either way, you're cheating by taking back the dress you already wore.

It's no different with books. I'm all for returning a book if you already own it, if there are major internal flaws (I recall last year when a book was printed without a chapter), or if the book itself is somehow faulty. That's like buying a dress for a party, putting it on at home, and seeing a hole in the seam you didn't notice in the store. Take it back and get something else.

A few months ago, a customer came into my store to return a candle. The candle had been burned almost do the bottom, almost fully used. The complaint? She didn't like the smell. I didn't accept the return or exchange for a new product. Why? She consumed the product she paid for. She burned the whole thing, then wanted something new for free? Uh...no.

seun
09-30-2012, 05:56 PM
A few months ago, a customer came into my store to return a candle. The candle had been burned almost do the bottom, almost fully used. The complaint? She didn't like the smell. I didn't accept the return or exchange for a new product. Why? She consumed the product she paid for. She burned the whole thing, then wanted something new for free? Uh...no.

This is why I no longer work in retail. Customers are bastards.

AbielleRose
09-30-2012, 06:26 PM
As a former bookstore manager, I'm very happy to see just how many people wouldn't return a book just because they didn't like it. There's a lot more that goes into returning a book from the resale end. I've had to wipe potato salad off books for sale in the store because people don't seem to understand that those books still want to go home with someone at some point.

A great deal of people treat bookstores as libraries. Reading a book within the 14 day return period and returning it to get a new one and then doing the same thing. When I was working there I actually had to ban a few people from the store for that sort of thing.

If people want a gently used book they go to Amazon, not Barnes and Noble or Boarders.

crunchyblanket
09-30-2012, 06:41 PM
I've had to wipe potato salad off books for sale in the store because people don't seem to understand that those books still want to go home with someone at some point.

When I used to work in a bookshop, we had a real dick of a customer we used to call Breadstick Man who would come in every day with a box of breadsticks (hence the name,) set up in the New Releases aisle and proceed to read the hardbacks cover to cover. He'd even mark his place in the books with a page-fold so he knew where to pick up again the next day. He had absolutely no regard for the book; he'd bend back the spine, fold over the pages and get breadcrumbs everywhere. In the end, I got pissed off and told him that if he ever came in again, I'd call security and tell them he was stealing.

AbielleRose
09-30-2012, 06:51 PM
When I used to work in a bookshop, we had a real dick of a customer we used to call Breadstick Man who would come in every day with a box of breadsticks (hence the name,) set up in the New Releases aisle and proceed to read the hardbacks cover to cover. He'd even mark his place in the books with a page-fold so he knew where to pick up again the next day. He had absolutely no regard for the book; he'd bend back the spine, fold over the pages and get breadcrumbs everywhere. In the end, I got pissed off and told him that if he ever came in again, I'd call security and tell them he was stealing.

Ugh! I truly don't understand how some people can be such *bleep*s! The town I live in is a big college town and students would come and pile up books 2 feet high on the floor next to the tables they'd work at. I have NO problem with students coming into the store to study. There's coffee, there are tables... but these kids would not only pile the books up, they'd rip pages out to take with them instead of buying the book. If they found one that would help with whatever it was they were working on (non-fiction books, in particular), they would RIP out pages!

As much as I love and adore books, working at that store was harder for me than almost any other job I've worked. When you see people behave with such disrespect to something you love, it sort of disillusions the greatness of working with something you love. It becomes a product and you have to force yourself to see it as a product.

That being said, as a product you're not allowed to buy a movie, take it home and watch it, decide you don't like it and return it. Why are books any different?

(ending my rant now, sorry!)

crunchyblanket
09-30-2012, 07:04 PM
but these kids would not only pile the books up, they'd rip pages out to take with them instead of buying the book. If they found one that would help with whatever it was they were working on (non-fiction books, in particular), they would RIP out pages!

Ugh. That's astonishing. It's like trying on a dress, realising that you hate it but you really like the buttons and pulling those buttons off. It's bloody stealing.

I could never work in a bookshop again. Between rude customers (a handful of whom were downright nasty...remind me to tell the story of Trevor the Racist sometime) morons like Breadstick Man (or the mothers who'd buy their kids revision books and attempt to return them once the exams were over) and the fact that we got rid of Historical Fiction/reduced the SF/F section to make way for "tragic life stories" (aka misery porn) ....I think I'd rather dance a naked samba on top of a moving train than do that ever again.

LJD
09-30-2012, 07:11 PM
To me, reading/listening to an entire book and then returning it after the fact is equivalent to buying a dress for a party, tucking in the tag, wearing, and then returning it the next day. You've basically "rented" the item, gotten your use out of it, and then went and got your money back. As someone who works in retail, I hate this. Maybe you had a great time at the party, maybe you had a terrible time at the party--either way, you're cheating by taking back the dress you already wore.

It's no different with books. I'm all for returning a book if you already own it, if there are major internal flaws (I recall last year when a book was printed without a chapter), or if the book itself is somehow faulty. That's like buying a dress for a party, putting it on at home, and seeing a hole in the seam you didn't notice in the store. Take it back and get something else.

That's how I see it too.


Interestingly, I notice that Chapters/Indigo has "guaranteed" reads:

Every Heather's Pick item is a guaranteed great read, so you may return any Heather’s Pick item at any time after purchase, in any condition, for a full refund. This guarantee is good for both Store and Online purchases. Proof of purchase is still required for the return. Returns more than 30 days after purchase will need to be returned to a Chapters, Indigo, or Coles store for processing.
(from the website)

Friendly Frog
10-01-2012, 12:23 AM
I can't imagine returning a book I have actually read even though I have hated it with a burning passion. But then I work in retail and know what it is like on the other side. But I'd definitely try to get rid of it in the second-hand market. My shelf-space is already limited enough as it is.

I have returned an (unread) book on one or two occassions but mostly because we ended up buying it double. (Three people buying books for one another can lead to that.)

I'd happily return a book for glaring production errors but I have to say I have not come across any like that. But that would only work if I still had the receipt and was within the allowed return-period, but since I often read books long after I bought them, this is usually no longer so.

mrsmig
10-01-2012, 12:55 AM
Some years ago I worked in the music department of a Barnes & Noble and we used to allow customers to bring back CDs they didn't like. It wasn't something we advertised, but this was before there was CD-copying technology readily available to the public. Most customers didn't abuse the policy, but I had one customer who for several weeks bought fistfuls of CDs and then returned them all a week later. I finally had to tell him he was abusing the privilege and to his credit, he agreed. I had another customer (a kid) who started bringing in CDs he'd clearly purchased someplace else and trying to swap them out for new ones. Had to put the kibosh on that, too.

It used to drive me crazy that B&N management not only allowed, but actually encouraged customers to read unpurchased books and magazines while they ate and drank. Management told me it was to make the customers feel at home, but I felt that it engendered a certain strange insolence; i.e. "if you don't give a sh*t about your products, why should I?" At the end of each and every sales day, we would find books and magazines that had been stained, dogeared, torn, stepped on, stuffed into the cushions of the armchairs with the spines broken and on and on and on. It broke my heart - such a waste of materials; so disrespectful to everyone who worked to produce that book.

So I don't return books, either - the sole exception being one that had been misprinted. I will either donate them to a charity or swap them for something else at www.paperbackswap.com (which is a great free resource to unload books you don't want anymore).

AbielleRose
10-01-2012, 02:29 AM
There's a really wonderful book 'recycling' program that I can't remember the name of. Basically, you leave a book someplace public, log it on a website and leave a note in that book for whoever finds it to log that book in on the website and then leave it someplace when they're done. I've always wanted to start participating but keep forgetting.

LJD
10-01-2012, 03:07 AM
It used to drive me crazy that B&N management not only allowed, but actually encouraged customers to read unpurchased books and magazines while they ate and drank. Management told me it was to make the customers feel at home, but I felt that it engendered a certain strange insolence; i.e. "if you don't give a sh*t about your products, why should I?" At the end of each and every sales day, we would find books and magazines that had been stained, dogeared, torn, stepped on, stuffed into the cushions of the armchairs with the spines broken and on and on and on. It broke my heart - such a waste of materials; so disrespectful to everyone who worked to produce that book.


Huh. In Chapters/Indigo here, you are not supposed to bring unpurchased materials into the in-store Starbucks. I'd assumed that was standard...

mrsmig
10-01-2012, 04:01 AM
There's a really wonderful book 'recycling' program that I can't remember the name of. Basically, you leave a book someplace public, log it on a website and leave a note in that book for whoever finds it to log that book in on the website and then leave it someplace when they're done. I've always wanted to start participating but keep forgetting.

It's called BookCrossing and it still exists: http://www.bookcrossing.com/

The program always reminded me of the "Where's George" practice of marking and tracking U.S. dollar bills. I've been with PaperbackSwap for years now and have found it really useful.

mrsmig
10-01-2012, 04:03 AM
Huh. In Chapters/Indigo here, you are not supposed to bring unpurchased materials into the in-store Starbucks. I'd assumed that was standard...

Barnes & Noble may have changed its policy since I worked there, eons ago.

KTC
10-01-2012, 04:07 AM
I've returned books because of printing flaws—major ones, like missing chapters or repeated chapters and missing text, or garbled pages.

And I've returned digital books (text and audio) for major production flaws.

But not liking a book isn't a reason, for my part.

I agree with this...totally.

And for books I REALLY didn't like...I found new homes for them. And more than once the person I gifted the book to loved it. So...not liking a book is just preference sometimes. Not a reason for me to take back the sale.

veinglory
10-01-2012, 04:22 AM
If the paper, printing and binding are sound, I see no reasonable basis for returning a book. Satisfaction is *not* guaranteed.

jjdebenedictis
10-01-2012, 04:58 AM
I guess it's a question of not punishing the wrong person/entity.

The quality of the story is the author's responsibility. If you hate the story, then the author is the one who earned your irritation, not the bookstore or the publisher.

The bookstore and the publisher do have some power to ensure the books on the shelves are of a certain level of quality, but they also need to ensure those books appeal to a very wide range of tastes. One individual reader can accidentally buy a book they won't like. That doesn't mean the bookstore or the publisher was wrong to put it out.

The appropriate "punishment", when you find you don't like a book, is to remember to not buy that author's books in future.

thothguard51
10-01-2012, 05:03 AM
Books I have read and did not like, or even finish usally go to the second hand book shop where I can get credits for books I want, generally those no longer in print.

There is also a program, where you donate books to prisons...

BenPanced
10-01-2012, 05:06 AM
Barnes & Noble may have changed its policy since I worked there, eons ago.
The ones I frequent with some regularity don't have any policies about taking books or other material into the Starbucks. The restrooms, on the other hand, have security alarms.

CheshireCat
10-01-2012, 05:31 AM
The bookstore and the publisher do have some power to ensure the books on the shelves are of a certain level of quality, but they also need to ensure those books appeal to a very wide range of tastes.

Um ... disagree. In fact, for many genres of fiction, the publisher's "responsibility" given their marketing is to do their best to insure the book appeals to a fairly narrow segment of the market.

I don't like the sword-and-sorcery sort of fantasy, for instance, and certainly don't expect to find that genre of books tailored to meet my tastes.

I do like thrillers, but don't expect to enjoy every one I pick up. Some will appeal to me and some won't. Why on earth would I blame the publisher for that? It's a matter of taste and preferences, and I don't expect them to market a book to an audience of one.

The publisher's only real "responsibility" to readers is to publish books they judge to be good ones, even as they perfectly understand that not every book is going to appeal to every reader.

As for an author's responsibility, same deal. Our only true obligation to the reader is to turn in the best possible book we can, given the limits of our skill and imagination. We hope a wide audience enjoys the book, of course. So does the publisher. But we know that within that audience will be people who are disappointed, or upset, or feel cheated in some way because the book didn't deliver whatever it was they expected.

A reason to return a read book to a store? No. If the book is missing pages or filled with typos or something of that sort, of course. Though I would hope the store would offer a replacement book rather than money back.

I know I've personally sent replacement books to readers who alerted me that there were copies out there with chunks of repeated or missing pages or other printer errors. I notified my publisher, and then sent the reader a replacement from my own stock, with apologies. (And a signature.)

That's just good business.

KalenO
10-01-2012, 05:56 AM
Yeah, returning books just because you didn't like them has always baffled me too. I always wonder....do those people also go out to eat at restaurants and then inform their waiter they won't be paying for their meal because they didn't like it, even though they finished the whole thing?

benbradley
10-01-2012, 06:10 AM
I got a book from a thrift store that halfway through I found pages out of order and missing. I was tempted to email the publisher to see if they would send me a defect-free replacement.

Like others here, I can't imagine "returning" an e-book or audio book because I didn't like it (though I find this Audible "feature" odd and interesting - do people, once they find out about it, start to abuse it???), but I wonder whether I should consider a <getting on my latest Hobby Horse> sentence fragment an "author's artistic decision" or a defect.


There's a really wonderful book 'recycling' program that I can't remember the name of. Basically, you leave a book someplace public, log it on a website and leave a note in that book for whoever finds it to log that book in on the website and then leave it someplace when they're done. I've always wanted to start participating but keep forgetting.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/
No excuses now. :D
I recall signing up years ago, mainly because I received such a marked book through http://paperbackswap.com (for bookcrossing you don't HAVE to leave it "out in the wild" - you can donate it to a thrift store or library sale or whatever) - I signed on to mark that I had received the book, but never did anything more with bookcrossing.

buz
10-01-2012, 06:30 AM
There's coffee, there are tables... but these kids would not only pile the books up, they'd rip pages out to take with them instead of buying the book. If they found one that would help with whatever it was they were working on (non-fiction books, in particular), they would RIP out pages!


!!!!

Expletive! Expletive expletive expletive...more...of those...

Bookewyrme
10-01-2012, 07:22 AM
Barnes & Noble may have changed its policy since I worked there, eons ago.


The ones I frequent with some regularity don't have any policies about taking books or other material into the Starbucks. The restrooms, on the other hand, have security alarms.
When I worked for B&N about 3 years ago now, that was the policy. Unpurchased materials were allowed in the Starbucks, but not the bathrooms. I worked in the cafe, and we always spent a fair amount of time picking up piles of books and magazines from the tables for the booksellers to reshelve. I don't remember finding them damaged very often though. Our cafe was EXTREMELY regular-customer heavy though.

jjdebenedictis
10-01-2012, 07:51 AM
Um ... disagree. In fact, for many genres of fiction, the publisher's "responsibility" given their marketing is to do their best to insure the book appeals to a fairly narrow segment of the market.Um... As far as I can tell, your post completely agrees with what I said. :)

The bookstores and publishers need to appeal to a wide variety of tastes, i.e. they need many different types of books so they can offer decent coverage of all the many narrow segments of the market.

CheshireCat
10-01-2012, 08:34 AM
Well, you weren't specific about genres tailored to individual markets. :Shrug:

Far as I can tell, that's the only difference. :)

third person
10-01-2012, 10:41 AM
If I don't like a book I'll leave it somewhere out in public for someone else to peruse and take if they like. That way a sale can stay a sale and maybe a fan can be made for the author.

blacbird
10-01-2012, 11:19 AM
I do this all the time at one particular source for books: The library.

caw

LindaJeanne
10-01-2012, 03:55 PM
I do this all the time at one particular source for books: The library.

Hopefully, in this case, you return the ones that you DID like, as well!

Becky Black
10-01-2012, 06:28 PM
No way I'd return a book if the only reason was that I read it and didn't like it. I'd think you'd have to have asked for second helpings when they gave out cheek to even contemplate that.

If there's physical damage or whatever to a paper book, or formatting issues to an ebook, then fine, the product is not as advertised, I'd want an exchange. Sometimes if I've ended up with two copies od something and have the reciept and it's in perfect condition I'd maybe go for an exchange, but I'm more likely to just regift it or something.

Phaeal
10-01-2012, 09:50 PM
Returning a book after you've already read it is indeed like returning clothes you've already worn for whatever event -- freeloading, entitlement whore, leech-like, bastardly behavior. Not that I feel strongly about it or anything.

I would return a book for physical damagement or omissions. I might also return a book that used objectively misleading descriptions of the content. That is, no return for "The best book ever!" blurbs. If you believe those, you get what you deserve. ;) But, say, the flap copy said the book was about vampire Rottweilers from hell, but there weren't any vampire Rottweilers in it, let alone vamp Rotties from hell.

I've only once come across a book like that, so yeah, this would be a rare return.

Kyra Wright
10-05-2012, 02:54 AM
I’ve returned two kindle books. Both were horribly written and edited, in my opinion, so much so that I was cringing while reading them. I read the samples first and saw no major flaws, but once I read further in after buying, it was like reading different books. I got 50 pages into the first book, and 30 pages into the second before giving up. I returned them (you have to return kindle books within seven days of purchase), and will return any other books that I feel similarly about. I will not read such books entirely, however. I have too many other good books to read to waste time reading a poorly written book.


I wish I'd known you can return kindle books sooner. I've bought a handful that had horrible, nearly unreadable formatting.

benbradley
10-05-2012, 03:59 AM
Did you post reviews saying this? I hope so. Having the previews "cleanly edited" where the rest is not sure smells like a bait-and-switch, like the authors KNEW what they were supposed to do, but didn't do it for the whole book.

"Horrible, nearly unreadable formatting" can honestly be called an e-book defect. Please post reviews of those too, with only those four words if nothing else.

Miyaka
10-05-2012, 04:24 AM
When I went to purchase a book once by Anne Rice as A. N. Roquelaure, the cashier tried to talk me out of buying it.

"Well , if you take it home and find that it was not what you were expecting ,bring it back."

I took it home,read a few chapters and realized it was not what I thought, but my roommate wanted to read it so I gave it to her.If my roommate had not wanted it , then I would have taken it back somewhat sheepishly to the store.



But I have never returned a book, thrown them away,lost,donated or regifted, yes.

Kyra Wright
10-05-2012, 05:07 AM
Did you post reviews saying this? I hope so. Having the previews "cleanly edited" where the rest is not sure smells like a bait-and-switch, like the authors KNEW what they were supposed to do, but didn't do it for the whole book.

"Horrible, nearly unreadable formatting" can honestly be called an e-book defect. Please post reviews of those too, with only those four words if nothing else.
I've started posting Amazon reviews in the last year, especially if I run across a book with poor formatting. I wish that Amazon would allow users to sort reviews by edition, because I've often spent a lot of time reading through reviews trying to find mention of formatting issues on kindle editions.

Buffysquirrel
10-08-2012, 02:46 AM
I returned a secondhand book a few years ago because it had a page folded over and bound into the spine, rendering it less than readable. It was a palaver. This was a book available in the US but not here. I was so desperate to have it that I ordered it from the US, then had to send it all the way back, then had to argue with Alibris because they refunded me the cost of the book but not the cost of returning it, then find another copy...and then by the time I'd done that, the rotten book appeared on shelves over here.