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justbishop
09-28-2012, 04:18 PM
If anyone could give me some opinions on a few research questions I need to answer for a chapter I'm preparing to write, I'd really appreciate it!

1. What would a somewhat wealthy, upper class family home be like in late 1800s-early 1900's France? I'm thinking a rural estate of some sort (Downton Abbey-like, maybe smaller), but an urban setting could also work.

2. What sort of profession might the father of the family have? My first thought was some sort of lawyer or even a noble/aristocrat who inherited his money, but that detail is also completely up for suggestion.

3. What would a 16 y/o and 19 y/o sons of a family like this be doing? I'm imagining one or both in college/university, and the older of the two in the process of courting a potential wife. How might a mentally ill family member negatively affect these two sons and their plans?

Thanks again in advance for any help!

frimble3
09-28-2012, 04:36 PM
What are the outward signs of the 'mental illness'? Because unless the outward behaviour is extreme, if the family is wealthy and upper-class enough, I believe the term at the time would have been 'eccentric' or 'quirky'. Especially if they're all living quietly in the country.

justbishop
09-28-2012, 05:00 PM
What are the outward signs of the 'mental illness'? Because unless the outward behaviour is extreme, if the family is wealthy and upper-class enough, I believe the term at the time would have been 'eccentric' or 'quirky'. Especially if they're all living quietly in the country.

She (14 y/o sister, youngest child) demonstrates behaviors of what they then called Dementia Praecox, and what would later be termed Childhood Onset Schizophrenia. She hears voices and hallucinates people that are not there (as far as anyone else knows) almost constantly.

Lehcarjt
09-28-2012, 11:20 PM
The thing about your questions is that the answers are SO broad that you're better off doing the research yourself rather than asking us. My suggestion is to look for a real historical family that fits your scenario and research them.

Siri Kirpal
09-28-2012, 11:34 PM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

About the family home: is it inherited or bought or newly built? Those things make a difference in what era of building style we're looking at. Some wealthy families even rented, and that would make a difference in the furnishings.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

justbishop
09-28-2012, 11:51 PM
The thing about your questions is that the answers are SO broad that you're better off doing the research yourself rather than asking us. My suggestion is to look for a real historical family that fits your scenario and research them.

I've been trying to research this stuff for days now and have not made much headway. Believe me, I wouldn't be asking here and wasting anyone's time as a first step.


Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

About the family home: is it inherited or bought or newly built? Those things make a difference in what era of building style we're looking at. Some wealthy families even rented, and that would make a difference in the furnishings.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Good question, thank you :)

And I'm leaning more toward it being an old family estate, so let's say inherited.

Siri Kirpal
09-29-2012, 05:34 AM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Then, figure out which section of France you're setting the story, then look at photos of manor houses from that region. I've got a book titled "Manor Houses in Normandy." You might be able to find it at your library or through inter-library loan. I believe there are similar books for Provence, and probably for Brittany and Burgundy as well.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Flicka
09-29-2012, 11:02 AM
If you are writing something set in a place and era you don't know too much about, you have a steep but amazingly fun journey ahead of you. Obviously, no one could possibly tell you all you need to know on here, but my tip would be to get a few solid books and check the list of sources at the end. That way you can start building a literature list.

Now, France... If only you'd asked about Germany because that's what I'm reading up on right now. I don't know too much about France, but a quick search through a reasearch library catalogue gave me a few books worth checking into:


Modernity and bourgeois life :*society, politics, and culture in England, France and Germany since 1750 /*Jerrold Seigel.

Growing up in France :*from the Ancien Régime to the Third Republic /*Colin Heywood.

France since 1870 :*culture, politics and society /*Charles Sowerwine

The Third Republic defended :*bourgeois reform in France, 1880-1914 /*Sanford Elwitt

It's a start anyway.

justbishop
09-29-2012, 04:57 PM
If you are writing something set in a place and era you don't know too much about, you have a steep but amazingly fun journey ahead of you. Obviously, no one could possibly tell you all you need to know on here, but my tip would be to get a few solid books and check the list of sources at the end. That way you can start building a literature list.

Now, France... If only you'd asked about Germany because that's what I'm reading up on right now. I don't know too much about France, but a quick search through a reasearch library catalogue gave me a few books worth checking into:


Modernity and bourgeois life :*society, politics, and culture in England, France and Germany since 1750 /*Jerrold Seigel.

Growing up in France :*from the Ancien Régime to the Third Republic /*Colin Heywood.

France since 1870 :*culture, politics and society /*Charles Sowerwine

The Third Republic defended :*bourgeois reform in France, 1880-1914 /*Sanford Elwitt

It's a start anyway.

Well, luckily, it's only one chapter, a past life of my modern day MC!

And thanks for the list, I will see what I can find at my local library. It's just tough to find the opportunity often, as my 3 year old doesn't tend to do well in the adult non-fiction section for long, lol!