PDA

View Full Version : Recommend an Old Movie



Maze Runner
09-17-2012, 11:51 PM
Not one that everyone is likely to have seen. I realize this is a bit subjective. My obscure gem may be your all time favorite movie. Also, "old" is a relative term, so let's allow for a margin of error.

Kirk Douglas in Detective Story, a Greek Tragedy set in a NYC police precinct. Douglas is an unforgiving cop who allows for absolutely NO margin of error, for no human weakness. It's only fitting that he should come face to face with the imperfect past of his pure, gorgeous wife, Eleanor Parker, his ideal in an otherwise flawed, ugly world.

blacbird
09-18-2012, 12:01 AM
Posse, also with Kirk Douglas, and Bruce Dern. Made around 1960, B&W western. One of Douglas's best performances, IMO, maybe because it's not one of his hero roles. I don't know if it's even available on DVD. I saw it recommended some years ago by Roger Ebert, and obtained a VHS by rental, but I haven't seen it in any Blockbuster in recent years, and I'd love to watch it again.

caw

Maze Runner
09-18-2012, 12:06 AM
Thanks Blacbird, I've heard of Posse, but never seen it. Bruce Dern always turns in a good performance. Another one with Douglas is The Big Sky.

Mclesh
09-18-2012, 12:07 AM
I'll have to look for that one, Bebop. It sounds film nourish? Love those. Like A Touch of Evil. Very cool movie. Thanks for the rec.

Here's one from me: The Manchurian Candidate, 1962, Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey, Angela Lansbury, Janet Leigh. Really interesting movie directed by John Frankenheimer. Explores the idea of brainwashing and controlling the actions of others, basically using them as puppets.

From IMDB: A former Korean War POW is brainwashed by Communists into becoming a political assassin. But another former prisoner may know how to save him.

blacbird
09-18-2012, 12:09 AM
Thanks Blacbird, I've heard of Posse, but never seen it. Bruce Dern always turns in a good performance. Another one with Douglas is The Big Sky.

As long as we're on a Douglas orgy, There Was a Crooked Man, Douglas and Henry Fonda, made about the same time as Posse. Again, not one of Douglas's hero roles.

caw

Maze Runner
09-18-2012, 12:12 AM
As long as we're on a Douglas orgy, There Was a Crooked Man, Douglas and Henry Fonda, made about the same time as Posse. Again, not one of Douglas's hero roles.

caw

Yeah, I like it when they play off type. Like when I've seen Hanks or Travolta or Jimmy Stewart play not such nice guys.

Maze Runner
09-18-2012, 12:17 AM
I'll have to look for that one, Bebop. It sounds film nourish? Love those. Like A Touch of Evil. Very cool movie. Thanks for the rec.

Here's one from me: The Manchurian Candidate, 1962, Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey, Angela Lansbury, Janet Leigh. Really interesting movie directed by John Frankenheimer. Explores the idea of brainwashing and controlling the actions of others, basically using them as puppets.

From IMDB: A former Korean War POW is brainwashed by Communists into becoming a political assassin. But another former prisoner may know how to save him.

Yeah, Manchurian Candidate. Maybe you know the story of how Sinatra, who owned the rights, shelved it right after the JFK assassination. Can't remember how many years, decades, it was before it surfaced. Angela Lansbury is truly evil, in the best possible way. Great flick!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detective_Story_(1951_film)

Didn't know for sure, but figured Detective Story had been a play. Very few scene locales in the thing. It is one you should look for. Douglas is a thing of beauty in this. Also, dig Lee Grant in one of her first roles, right before she got blacklisted for "Communist Ties."

DarthPanda
09-18-2012, 12:18 AM
For some reason, almost all the obscure old movies I love are depressing as hell.

Back Street (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Back_Street_%281941_film%29), the 1941 version with Charles Boyer and Margaret Sullavan. Haven't seen the two other versions so I don't know how they compare.

Enchantment (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enchantment_%281948_film%29), 1948... another lovely old wrist-cutter starring David Niven, who was awesome in everything.

Faithless (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faithless_%281932_film%29), 1932 with Tallulah Bankhead and Robert Montgomery. Slightly happier ending, but still... lord have mercy.

On a lighter note (and I don't know if this one is popular or not, and it's kinda corny, I guess), The Lady Eve (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lady_Eve) with Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda. Screwball romantic comedy from 1941.


ETA: Not really that old, and not obscure but certainly not as well-known as it should be... King Rat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Rat_%28film%29), 1965 with George Segal and James Fox. Based on the James Clavell novel.

Torgo
09-18-2012, 12:22 AM
Ooh, OK. Here's a couple that spring to mind while my microwave curry revolves, and which you might not have seen:

Plein Soleil, the first (French) adaptation of The Talented Mr Ripley, is lovely - with Alain Delon as Ripley. Philip Seymour Hoffman aside, it's the best version.

The Hidden - it's a buddy-cop movie with Michael Nouri and Kyle Maclachlan, in which the bad guy is a body-stealing alien. A really good, violent, SF B-movie, this. Feels like a forgotten John Carpenter.

Maze Runner
09-18-2012, 12:25 AM
Darth Panda, the only one of those that I've seen is The Lady Eve. I really like Barbara Stanwick. Wait, let me rephrase that- I am in love with Barbara Stanwick, and have been my entire life.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmjnJhotUqw

Can you blame me?

Elaine Margarett
09-18-2012, 12:28 AM
I recently watch a movie on TCM called "Baby Doll." Made in 1958 it starred a very young (and handsome) Eli Wallach and Karl Malden. I forget who the young actress is but she was blackballed by hollywood for a reason I can't now recall. (I was so taken by her and the movie I looked her up on IMDB.)

I tuned in initially because it takes place in Mississippi and I was curious to see how 1958 Hollywood portrayed the culture/environment of the deep south in the 50's.

I got caught up in the amazing acting and found out it was based on a Tennesee Williams play by the same name.

Mesmerizing performances, and it was so much fun to see actors in their prime that I had only come to know in the later years of their career.

DarthPanda
09-18-2012, 12:31 AM
I recently watch a movie on TCM called "Baby Doll." Made in 1958 it starred a very young (and handsome) Eli Wallach(sp, sorry) and Karl Malden. I forget who the young actress is but she was blackballed by hollywood for a reason I can't now recall. (I was so taken by her and the movie I looked her up on IMDB.)

I tuned in initially because it takes place in Mississippi and I was curious to see how 1958 Hollywood portrayed the culture/environment of the deep south in the 50's.

I got caught up in the amazing acting and found out it was based on a Tennesee Williams play by the same name.

Mesmerizing performances, and it was so much fun to see actors in their prime that I had only come to know in the later years of their career.

Yesss that's one of my favorite movies. Carroll Baker.

Holy sexual tension, Batman.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
09-18-2012, 12:41 AM
His Kind of Woman, Robert Mitchum, Jane Russell, and Vincent Price (believe it or not). Film Noir, typical private eye pot boiler from 1951.

Foxes of Harrow, Rex Harrison, Maureen O'Hara - He's a low class gambler born on the wrong side of the sheets in Ireland; she's an aristocratic snob with a thing or two to learn about real life.

Ghost and Mrs. Muir, Rex Harrison and Gene Tierney. Impossible love, a weakness of mine.

Laura, another film noir with a police detective in love with a dead woman. Gene Tierney and Dana Andrews.

I could go on for pages and pages...I've got a million of 'em. :)

firedrake
09-18-2012, 12:44 AM
I love the old Romantic films:

Brief Encounter is my absolute favourite - screenplay by Noel Coward.

Maze Runner
09-18-2012, 12:45 AM
Laura! Love it, and the theme song is haunting...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lG620Usj7pQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=-khTs9BXKIw

Elaine Margarett
09-18-2012, 12:46 AM
Yesss that's one of my favorite movies. Carroll Baker.

Holy sexual tension, Batman.

Carroll Baker, that's it! I read she was supposed to get the Liz Taylor part in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof before she ran afoul of the Hollywood casting system. What an amazing performace, and what a waste of a beautiful and brillant actress.

Maze Runner
09-18-2012, 01:18 AM
Yesss that's one of my favorite movies. Carroll Baker.

Holy sexual tension, Batman.

Palpable sexual tension! For those who haven't seen it, Karl Malden, Baker's much older husband, made an agreement with her father that they wouldn't consummate their marriage until Baby Doll turns 20 years old- so he's been waiting, imagining, peeking through key holes in anticipation. Enter Eli Wallach to turn the tension into urgency. Great one!

Maze Runner
09-18-2012, 01:59 AM
Had forgotten that Elia Kazan directed Baby Doll. Funny or maybe not, considering the time period, how Communism/sympathizers/witch hunts keep coming up. Kazan, unlike most of them rolled. Maybe my favorite old movie is On The Waterfront with Marlon Brando, Malden again, Rod Steiger, Lee J. Cobb and Eva Marie Saint- this was Kazan's attempt to justify his naming of names, as Terry Malloy, the Brando character is torn between doing "the right thing" and loyalty to his brother and Cobb, and where is bread is buttered. The ante is upped when he falls for Marie Saint, the sister of a rat the mob throws off a tenement roof in the very first scene.

"Conscience, conscience," a torn Malloy thinks out loud, "that's all I've been hearing lately!" Kazan, whether you approve or disapprove of what he did, I think in hindsight, few do- was one of the greatest at what he did. He also directed the film Streetcar Named Desire, another one by Tennessee Williams.

J.S.F.
09-18-2012, 02:07 AM
Old films? Lots of good recommendations so far.

From the thirties, Little Caesar is antiquated but shows Edward G. Robinson as a future star. It Happened One Night is still a classic. Hard not to like this film.

If you want comedy, Unfaithfully Yours and Sullivan's Travels, both Preston Sturges comedies (he also directed The Lady Eve) and both worth watching. The latter is a classic screwball comedy focusing on the human condition with Joel McCrae and Veronica Lake (beautiful woman who unfortunately suffered from severe mental instability later on in life).

Another McCrae film and Randolph Scott's last is Ride the High Country, one of the finest Westerns ever made. Lots more out there and I'll have to make a list one of these days.

Elaine Margarett
09-18-2012, 02:51 AM
Palpable sexual tension! For those who haven't seen it, Karl Malden, Baker's much older husband, made an agreement with her father that they wouldn't consummate their marriage until Baby Doll turns 20 years old- so he's been waiting, imagining, peeking through key holes in anticipation. Enter Eli Wallach to turn the tension into urgency. Great one!

Great blurb. It'd make a good pitch. <g>

EM,
who would rep you if she could.

LOG
09-18-2012, 04:51 AM
12 Angry Men

Mclesh
09-18-2012, 04:59 AM
Bebop, I'd heard the story about Frank Sinatra shelving The Manchurian Candidate because of the JFK assassination. I've also heard that that's a wive's tale. Who knows?

Baby Doll. That movie was a trip. Very interesting/almost wrong. The relationship between Karl Malden and Baby Doll was so creepy.

Night of The Hunter, directed by Charles Laughton, starring Robert Mitchum as the creepy bad guy/phony preacher, and Lillian Gish in one of her last roles. It's beautifully shot, also black & white. Very eerie, suspenseful, with a lot of interesting symbolism.

Toothpaste
09-18-2012, 06:03 AM
Three of my absolute favourite non-musicals: ROMAN HOLIDAY, ALL ABOUT EVE (where you have some of the best one liners in film), TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD.

Musicals: SINGING IN THE RAIN, THE COURT JESTER (though it's really more of a comedy, the songs are oddly secondary) - also SEVEN BRIDES FIR SEVEN BROTHERS is ridiculous, but the dance sequences are insane.

sunandshadow
09-18-2012, 06:31 AM
The Hallelujah Trail 1965, Burt Lancaster, Lee Remick, and several other well-loved actors and actresses. This western comedy follows a hilarious struggle between 5 factions: a wagon train of whiskey and champagne driven my Irish teamsters, the group of rag-tag miners who ordered the alcohol, a U.S. cavalry division requested as a protective escort, a band of indians who want to capture the alcohol, and a group of female temperance marchers who don't want to see the alcohol get delivered.

sailor
09-18-2012, 07:39 AM
I love the Hallelujah Trail. A couple of other Burt Lancaster ones:

The Scalphunters (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063557/) 1968
A western costarring Ossie Davis, Telly Savalas and Shelly Winters. Funny, serious, smart and some violence. Lancaster as a fur trapper forced to trade his furs for an escaped slave at gunpoint by some Kiowas. The rest his attempt to recover his furs. Davis almost steals the film.

The Crimson Pirate (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0044517/) 1952
Lancaster at his acrobatic best, with Nick Cravat as his mute sidekick. Mute because his New York accent was too thick to disguise. All the acrobat training Lancaster got in the circus is put to good use here, as well as his mega-watt smile. A great pirate movie about the Caribbean but filmed in the Mediterranean. Cinematography is great, tongue firmly planted in cheek and some of the most polite pirates you'll ever see.

Another favourite of mine, We're No Angels (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0048801/) 1955. Humphrey Bogart, Peter Ustinov and Aldo Ray as escapees from Devil's Island. With Basil Rathbone, Leo G Carroll and Joan Bennett. One of the few comedies from Bogart. When he tells his mates that he is going to purchase a turkey for christmas dinner, they look at him askance. He tells them not to worry, he has to steal the money first.

Mclesh
09-18-2012, 07:43 AM
Toothpaste, All About Eve is one of my all-time favorites. Bette Davis has the best lines. I can watch it over and over. And George Saunders is so evil!

And your description of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers is spot on. It is such a ridiculously corny movie, but the choreography is amazing.

J.S.F.
09-18-2012, 07:45 AM
Went the Day Well was a British documentary-style movie done WWII which dramatized an invasion by the Nazis of a small English village and how the villagers fight back. Very low-key, extremely well-acted and surprisingly brutal for the times.

Sci-fi, anything in the Quartermass series (movies). A lot of people disliked having an American (Brian Donlevy) in the lead and that the movies were sort of talky but the dialogue was excellent for the most part and Donlevy played his part well. I rather liked the 1968 version with Andrew Keir.

Other old flicks, the original Frankenstein, The Old Dark House, and even though it isn't that old, The Abominable Dr. Phibes. Very clever, and also clever of using Hugh Griffith to play the rabbi. In Ben-Hur, he played an Arab. And he was Welsh. Go figure.

DarthPanda
09-18-2012, 08:00 AM
Akira Kurosawa's Ikiru (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ikiru). 1952. Dying businessman seeks meaning in apathetic world. It's long and slow-moving by Western standards, but it's one of those movies that just haunts you forever.

The wiki entry behind the link is a giant spoiler, just a warning. Not that knowing the ending ruins the film in any way. It's not that kind of story.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
09-18-2012, 07:46 PM
The Changeling, George C Scott - not really all that old, but quite chilling.

The Long Gray Line, a tearjerker based on a book by Martin Maher called 'Bringing Up the Brass' (I've searched for it everywhere!). It's a biographical tale about an Irish imigrant and his life as a civilian at West Point through two world wars.

ETA: Damn! There's finally a copy on amazon for $145! GAH!

regdog
09-18-2012, 07:51 PM
Heaven Know Mr Allison

Goodbye Mr Chips

Maze Runner
09-18-2012, 08:00 PM
Someone mentioned Little Caesar upthread, with Edward G. Robinson. Made me think of House of Strangers with Edward G., Richard Conte, and Susan Hayward. Conte, a lawyer who's just getting out of prison when the story begins, did time for jury tampering in an attempt to save the skin of his father, Edward G, the founder of a Little Italy bank with unorthodox business practices. Flashback to when all was well, and Edward G. ruled his bank and his family without challenge. Edward G. was a versatile actor, equally believable in drama and comedy, as the heavy or the hero.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Strangers

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luOpf0YJK0A

In the interest of full disclosure, I'll have to issue a melodrama alert for this one.

DarthPanda
09-18-2012, 11:04 PM
Returning to Baby Doll for a moment, since there were a few other fans on the thread...

I watched it again last night after reading all the posts, and then looked up some essays about it. The ambiguous ending always bothered me (not because it was anything less than a great ending... but I like closure :o). I reeeally wanted to know if Silva came back or not. Turns out that in Williams's stage version (Tiger Tail), they very clearly are together at the end, but explicitly showing them together in the film wasn't possible due to the MPPC/Hays code. So it's safe to assume that he does come back for Baby Doll and Aunt Rose.

Kazan also had to convince the censors that nothing happened after the "fade to black" scene where they go upstairs to take a nap, although in his production diary he suggests that it's a given that something did happen.

Not totally relevant to the current topic, but it's something that's always bugged me and I figured I'd share in case it bugged anybody else, too. :D

J.S.F.
09-19-2012, 02:27 AM
Someone mentioned Little Caesar upthread, with Edward G. Robinson. Made me think of House of Strangers with Edward G., Richard Conte, and Susan Hayward. Conte, a lawyer who's just getting out of prison when the story begins, did time for jury tampering in an attempt to save the skin of his father, Edward G, the founder of a Little Italy bank with unorthodox business practices. Flashback to when all was well, and Edward G. ruled his bank and his family without challenge. Edward G. was a versatile actor, equally believable in drama and comedy, as the heavy or the hero.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Strangers

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luOpf0YJK0A

In the interest of full disclosure, I'll have to issue a melodrama alert for this one.
-----

'Twas me who mentioned Little Caesar. Robinson was a very versatile actor, someone who changed his style and approach as the years went by. Even though his career faded in the early fifties due to his semi-blacklisting by the HUAC (and then he made a comeback playing Dathan in The Ten Commandments) he never gave up his ideals.

My parents saw him onstage in Toronto in the late fifties and he was a powerhouse. Not very tall or well-built and never good-looking, he dominated every scene he was in. He was that good.

Manuel Royal
09-19-2012, 03:16 AM
Bebop, I'd heard the story about Frank Sinatra shelving The Manchurian Candidate because of the JFK assassination. I've also heard that that's a wive's tale. Who knows?These people do. (http://www.snopes.com/movies/films/manchurian.asp) Not true.

I wanted to recommend Underworld U.S.A. (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0055571/) (1961), a neat little picture with a young Cliff Robertson methodically taking revenge against crime bosses for his father's murder.

TorontoGirl
09-19-2012, 03:53 AM
If you don't mind me jumping in here, I have a few suggestions:
Sweet Smell of Success with Tony Curtis (1957)
Up the Down Staircase with Sandy Dennis (1967)
The Out of Towners with Jack Lemmon & Sandy Dennis (1970)

I love watching TCM.

Maze Runner
09-19-2012, 06:03 AM
If you don't mind me jumping in here, I have a few suggestions:
Sweet Smell of Success with Tony Curtis (1957)
Up the Down Staircase with Sandy Dennis (1967)
The Out of Towners with Jack Lemmon & Sandy Dennis (1970)

I love watching TCM.

Don't mind at all. Especially when you list three of my all time favorites. Burt Lancaster was great in Sweet Smell of Success as well, as the NYC newspaper columnist who wields his power in merciless ways.

A few you reminded me of: Another nod for Jack Lemmon- talk about versatile! Funny as hell, as he is in The Out of Towners and another one by Neil Simon that many may not have seen- The Prisoner of Second Avenue, as a middle aged guy who loses his job. Anne Bancroft as his wife is also great, but when was she ever bad?

And I can't think of Sandy Dennis without thinking of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Not really obscure, but worth mentioning for anyone who hasn't seen it, writers especially. Great dialogue and subtext. Richard Burton and Liz Taylor in a marriage from hell. Based on the great play by Edward Albee.

And Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick in the drama, The Days of Wine and Roses, as a loving couple with a child who drown their marriage in booze.

Skibone21
09-19-2012, 06:20 AM
I'm more of a film noir fan than anything else as my suggestions will show and you usually get to see an actor or actress in a leading role that might not get the opportunity to show their ability on a regular basis:

Criss Cross 1949 - Some think Yvonne De Carlo was an odd choice but I believe she was just the change up for a femme fatale. One that was actually FUN, kniving, and moneygrubbing. Most were just plain cold.

Flaxy Martin 1949 - A B movie but I love Virginia Mayo so that should explain itself.

The Paradine Case 1947 - Wish we had the original version still around to see more of Valli. Apparently when it was screened she was given a negative review. But I think she was better for the role than Bergman because of her exotic beauty alone and the fact that she was as cold as they came in real life.

Notorious 1946 - In my top 5 if not 3 of movies all time. Hitchcocks best in my opinion.

Cover Girl 1944 - You get to meet Rita Hayworth as she'd be known forever.

Dr. Zhivago 1965
Samson and Delilah 1949
Angel Face 1952

SirOtter
09-19-2012, 06:27 AM
Samson and Delilah 1949


"I refuse to see a picture where the man's tits are bigger than the woman's." - Groucho Marx

Skibone21
09-19-2012, 08:11 AM
"I refuse to see a picture where the man's tits are bigger than the woman's." - Groucho Marx

I don't think many were looking at the man's tits when you have Hedy sitting there haha. Don't think she ever looked better

poetinahat
09-19-2012, 08:18 AM
None of these is obscure, but I love them.

Now, Voyager - Bette Davis and Paul Henried: agonising, beautiful story of love that can't be

The Philadelphia Story - Katherine Hepburn, Cary Grant, James Stewart. Magnificent.

I love every episode of The Thin Man I've seen.

SirOtter
09-19-2012, 08:51 AM
I don't think many were looking at the man's tits when you have Hedy sitting there haha. Don't think she ever looked better

Well, she was nekkid in Ekstase, which I think might qualify as looking better. ;)

I think the comment was more aimed at Victor Mature's assets than hers.

Speaking of Mature, Kiss of Death is an awesome film.

J.S.F.
09-19-2012, 10:43 AM
"It's Hedley, it's Hedley!"

Another gem I found was Sherlock Jr., a silent film with Buster Keaton. I never cared for silents in general, never liked Chaplin (I know, blasphemy), but Keaton's flicks transcend time, and Sherlock Jr. stuffs every single trick shot in the book into a very tidy little flick. Great opening and funny closing.

Speaking of funny, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum is still tops in my book. The 'mare's sweat' scene always gets me laughing.

For old horror, Curse of the Demon (maybe someone already mentioned it) is excellent for suggested horror and general creepiness. Cheesy monster at the end but up until that point, very suspenseful. Totally cool.

Elaine Margarett
09-19-2012, 05:10 PM
Returning to Baby Doll for a moment, since there were a few other fans on the thread...

I watched it again last night after reading all the posts, and then looked up some essays about it. The ambiguous ending always bothered me (not because it was anything less than a great ending... but I like closure :o). I reeeally wanted to know if Silva came back or not. Turns out that in Williams's stage version (Tiger Tail), they very clearly are together at the end, but explicitly showing them together in the film wasn't possible due to the MPPC/Hays code. So it's safe to assume that he does come back for Baby Doll and Aunt Rose.

:D

Oh, I'm so glad! I assumed he returned (because I wanted him to <g>). I didn't want to think he was using Baby Doll and I hated the way Aunt Rose was treated. Being Italian (well half Italian/half Irish) it didn't surprise me that Silva was treated as not-as-good as the whites in 1950's Mississippi. Wasn't Eli Wallach wonderful in the role? I loved him in his later years, but this was the first movie I saw him in as a man in his prime. OMG he was hawt!!!

Maze Runner
09-19-2012, 10:08 PM
These people do. (http://www.snopes.com/movies/films/manchurian.asp) Not true.

I wanted to recommend Underworld U.S.A. (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0055571/) (1961), a neat little picture with a young Cliff Robertson methodically taking revenge against crime bosses for his father's murder.


Oh, I'm so glad! I assumed he returned (because I wanted him to <g>). I didn't want to think he was using Baby Doll and I hated the way Aunt Rose was treated. Being Italian (well half Italian/half Irish) it didn't surprise me that Silva was treated as not-as-good as the whites in 1950's Mississippi. Wasn't Eli Wallach wonderful in the role? I loved him in his later years, but this was the first movie I saw him in as a man in his prime. OMG he was hawt!!!

I knew I liked you. A couple you might like. The Quiet Man, with John Wayne, Maureen Ohara, Barry fitzgerald, and Victor McLaughlin. Mostly light fare with a dark undertone- Wayne is an ex-prizefighter who leaves America for his ancestral homeland, Ireland, after killing a man in the ring. He takes one look at untamed beauty O'Hara and there is no turning back- problem is, her brother, Mclaughlin, who goads the Duke into a fistfight every chance he gets. Wayne, however, is reluctant to engage, given his recent violent past.

Another one that is I'd say 87.5% light fare is Sophia Loren and Clark Gable in, It Started in Naples. Funny movie, really. Loren sister is the ex of Gables dead womanizing brother- before Gable visits the quaint isle of Capri to settle affairs. The kid in this, is just perfect.

And one that's not light at all, The Black Orchid. Loren, on this side of the Atlantic, is the widow of a slain mob moss- I think it's Jersey. She has a kid who's in a reform school to boot. Quinn is a florist with a daughter, Ina Balin, with the identical mental affliction of her late mother. It might be that the entire thing is on y---tube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJg8m9kETtI

To Manuel and Mclesh- I know I read that somewhere, and I think more than once. I'd believe either explanation.

DarthPanda
09-19-2012, 10:27 PM
I knew I liked you. A couple you might like. The Quiet Man, with John Wayne, Maureen Ohara, Barry fitzgerald, and Victor McLaughlin.


Sir! Sir! ...Here's a good stick, to beat the lovely lady!

Maze Runner
09-19-2012, 10:39 PM
Sir! Sir! ...Here's a good stick, to beat the lovely lady!

Right, right... was that a Fitzgerald line?

DarthPanda
09-19-2012, 11:00 PM
Right, right... was that a Fitzgerald line?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IftG_SBjB6I

Hahaha, that scene looks so awful out of context, but it's so funny in the movie.

Sooo many great one-liners through the whole film, really.

Maze Runner
09-19-2012, 11:03 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IftG_SBjB6I

Hahaha, that scene looks so awful out of context, but it's so funny in the movie.

Sooo many great one-liners through the whole film, really.

Love it! I could use a good stick myself!



Just joking ladies. If I do need a good stick it would only be to use in self defense. My wife has a right hand like Rocky Marciano.

Gravity
09-19-2012, 11:24 PM
Ace in the Hole, with Kirk Douglas, and directed by Billy Wilder. Douglas plays a get-the-story-at-any-price reporter who's granted the exclusive right to interview a trapped miner who knows his time is running out. Based on a true story, it's acted to perfection and utterly harrowing.

For lighter fare, try The Twelve Thousand Fingers of Doctor T (from a story by Dr. Seuss!) Mostly presented as an extended dream, it stars Hans Conreid as a tyrannical piano teacher with dozens of students trapped in a mad world, and is one of the most surrealistic things you'll ever see.

Timmy V.
09-19-2012, 11:34 PM
Whatever Happened to Baby Jane - Joan Crawford, Bette Davis. Fantastic tee hee.

The Whales of August - 1987 - obscure - Lillian Gish, Bette Davis, Vincent Price, Ann Southern. a movie about aging. I loved that movie.

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton

OUTTTTTTTTTTTSTANDING.

Maze Runner
09-20-2012, 12:22 AM
Ace in the Hole, with Kirk Douglas, and directed by Billy Wilder. Douglas plays a get-the-story-at-any-price reporter who's granted the exclusive right to interview a trapped miner who knows his time is running out. Based on a true story, it's acted to perfection and utterly harrowing.

For lighter fare, try The Twelve Thousand Fingers of Doctor T (from a story by Dr. Seuss!) Mostly presented as an extended dream, it stars Hans Conreid as a tyrannical piano teacher with dozens of students trapped in a mad world, and is one of the most surrealistic things you'll ever see.

Ace in the Hole is great! Haven't seen the other one. Thanks.

How 'bout another one from John Wayne? A western: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance- also with Jimmy Stewart and Lee Marvin. Stewart is a lawyer newly arrived in Shinbone- what territory, I can't recall. Stewart's welcome comes from Marvin, an outlaw with a real estate beef who gives Jimmy a good thrashing before he even gets into town. The sheriff is the pubescent voiced Andy Devine who goes into hiding at the first sign of trouble. Wayne is what? I guess a rancher, but the only guy in town with the stones to stand up to Marvin- other than Jimmy Stewart of course, once he gets riled. If you haven't seen it, if you like westerns, if you think that John Wayne was the hands down number one cinema cowboy, this is one for you.

A good clip from after Stewart's taken his beating, after he's made it into town, learning the facts of frontier life from John Wayne. And who better to teach it?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exObFY-sHQw&feature=fvwrel

Elaine Margarett
09-20-2012, 01:17 AM
Not necessarily an old movie but on the obscure side... The orginal Japanese version (with subtitles) of "Shall We Dance?" I absolutely loved it!

It's one of my favorite films and the fact they could even consider remaking it with a western (as in NOT Japanese) cast horrified me. I refused to see the remake. This film is such a sweet description of Japanese life, it's people and their sense of duty, they had to have ruined it. :-(

BTW, I rented this movie years ago when my kids were middle school age. They love it too.

J.S.F.
09-20-2012, 01:31 AM
Not necessarily an old movie but on the obscure side... The orginal Japanese version (with subtitles) of "Shall We Dance?" I absolutely loved it!

It's one of my favorite films and the fact they could even consider remaking it with a western (as in NOT Japanese) cast horrified me. I refused to see the remake. This film is such a sweet description of Japanese life, it's people and their sense of duty, they had to have ruined it. :-(

BTW, I rented this movie years ago when my kids were middle school age. They love it too.

---

It isn't obscure--in Japan.:) (I live here, so I should know...)

You can find it on DVD, I believe, and if Amazon or another company doesn't carry it, check out YouTube. There are places where the movie is in its entirety with subtitles. A perfect movie, IMO.

If you really want obscure, check out two old B&W's. Whispering Footsteps was a short movie (around 70 minutes) made by a hack director named Howard Bretherton who did mainly cheapo Monogram westerns and some of the early Superman TV show episodes. THIS was his best film, and very clever.

This is Not a Test is on YouTube, a story about a nuclear accident. Low-budget but very well acted and directed.

PineMarten
09-20-2012, 01:37 AM
I used to regularly go to my local cinema to see one-off old movies on Saturday mornings because they were super-cheap. Of these, In The Heat of the Night and Taxi Driver
were probably my favourites.

I can't forget good old Akira Kurosawa though. I want to be more obscure, but whatever -- Seven Samurai is awesome.

Someone is currently screaming at their computer screen after seeing me describe it as an 'old' movie. My deepest apologies. :P

SirOtter
09-20-2012, 02:28 AM
For lighter fare, try The Twelve Thousand Fingers of Doctor T (from a story by Dr. Seuss!)

Even the movies suffer from inflation, it seems. It's actually The Five Thousand Fingers of Dr. T. Watched it not long ago with my granddaughter.

Ace in the Hole is a great film, too.

regdog
09-22-2012, 07:43 PM
the treasure of santa vittoria

jvc
09-22-2012, 08:35 PM
Bridge on the river Kwai.

Mark Moore
09-22-2012, 09:28 PM
Last Man on Earth - starring Vincent Price. Vampire movie based on a novel called "I Am Legend" (which was Willified fairly recently).

Last Woman on Earth - If you're in the mood for some corn, check out this 1960 Roger Corman film. Costarring screenwriter Robert Towne (who later went on to win the Oscar for the screenplay for "Chinatown", I believe) under the fake name "Edward Wain". Silly little post-apocalyptic tale with a few good lines and a musical score that's surprisingly effective and sticks with you.

Maze Runner
09-22-2012, 11:08 PM
the treasure of santa vittoria

The one with Anthony Quinn where the residents of a small Italian town have to hide the wine from the Nazis, right? Will google to be sure...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Secret_of_Santa_Vittoria

I'd forgotten that Quinn was the mayor of the town. This is a great one.

How 'bout one from Quinn where he plays a retired boxer? Requiem for a Heavyweight. He ends up a wrestler, faced with all the indignities therein.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPtudkGA14w&feature=related

Sadly, Montgomery Clift died too young. IMO, he was one of the best. Many of you have seen From Here to Eternity, where he plays the hard headed company bugler just prior to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, a gifted boxer who refuses to get back in the ring after he blinded one of his opponents. And many of you have seen A Place in the Sun, the love story where he stars opposite Liz Taylor. But I would bet most of you have not seen "Wild River" where Clift, an administrator for the Tennessee Valley Authority has the unpleasant task of evacuating a rural area which will be flooded once a new dam is operational. Clift plays opposite the beautiful, talented Lee Remick who also left us too soon.

Here's a clip from a talk show, where Remick mentions Wild River as one of her favorites that not many have seen.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SR5ChHwFbU

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_River_(film)

Here's a nice tribute to Clift I found on Y.. tube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OzprgVikM-A

I read a bio on him, years ago, "Monty". It presented quite a sad picture of the actor's life. Anyone ever know anyone who seemed too sensitive for the world? Clift had a lot of issues in his personal life, not the least of which was a bad car accident that left him noticeably disfigured. But as an actor, he was in a rarefied league. When they asked De Niro who were to him real screen actors. He said, Dean, Brando, and Clift.

Some "Taps" for Clift...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fxH-2LnRkc

Maryn
09-23-2012, 12:00 AM
Oh, so many wonderful movies named here, and so many suggestions for ones I haven't seen! Thank you all.

My contribution is the Katharine Hepburn-Cary Grant farce "Bringing Up Baby." I watched it with our kids when they were in high school, and we were delighted at how well it had aged. And now they understand that indefinable "it" Kate had in spades.

Maryn, praying nobody remakes it with Tina Fey and Adam Sandler

sailor
09-23-2012, 01:52 AM
Maryn, praying nobody remakes it with Tina Fey and Adam Sandler

Nah, it'll be with Lindsay Lohan and Will Ferrell.

Cybernaught
09-23-2012, 02:23 AM
The African Queen

childeroland
09-23-2012, 02:51 AM
I don't know if this is really obscure, but Gun Crazy (1950) with Peggy Cummings and John Dall is an excellent little crime thriller, a good companion piece to Detour (1945) and Nightmare Alley (1947). The 80's horror film Paperhouse is not really old but deserves more love. Le deuxieme souffle (1966) is not really obscure either but you don't hear this talked about as much as Rififi and Bob Le Flambeur. The Housemaid (1960) is one of the great psychological thrillers of all time, right up there with the best of Hitchcock.

J.S.F.
09-24-2012, 02:34 AM
Loved Gun Crazy and Nightmare Alley. Have the DVD's for both those movies. Not really that old but I loved the Hammer horror flicks with Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. The Gorgon was excellent and it scared the hell out of me as a kid. It's on YouTube as are many of the Hammer movies.