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View Full Version : What's your favorite horror film ? New or old ?



KevinG
09-14-2012, 04:02 AM
It may be a little early to start this thread and I apologize if this thread was already created but I wanted to know what is everyone's favorite horror movie ? Feel free to explain why. It could be old or new. I am hoping to dedicate this thread just on horror films. Here is my list (in no particular order):

1) A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)

2) The Exorcist

3) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)

4) Friday the 13th (1980)

5) Halloween (1978)

6) Hellrasier

7) Suspiria

8) Frankenstein

9) The Bride of Frankenstein

10) Dracula

11) The Mummy (1932)

12) The Invisible Man

13) The Wolf Man

14) The Creature from The Black Lagoon

15) Cannibal Holocaust

16) The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

17) Cannibal

18) Phantasm

19) Dawn of the Dead (1978)

20) Maniac

21) Carrie

22) Scream

23) Basket Case

24) The Wicker Man (1973)

25) Creepshow

26) Child's Play

27) Jaws

28) Alien

29) Poltergeist

30) Alice, Sweet Alice

31) The Shinning

32) Black Christmas (1974)

33) The Blair Witch Project

34) The Fly (1986)

35) The Evil Dead

36) An American Werewolf in London

37) Dead Alive

38) The Beyond

39) Faces of Death

40) Traces of Death

41) Antropophagus

42) The House by the Cemetery

43) The Amityville Horror (1979)

44) Nosferatu

45) Dolls

46) Puppet Master

47) Psycho (1960)

48) The Birds

49) Candyman

50) Freaks (1932)

KevinG
09-14-2012, 04:08 AM
By the way, if no one ever heard of some of these titles before, I highly recommend you check them out.

druid12000
09-14-2012, 04:17 AM
I highly recommend 'The Changeling'. One of the only movies that actually gave me the willies.

KevinG
09-14-2012, 04:21 AM
OH MAN!!!! I cannot believe I completely forgot about The Changeling!!!! Your right druid12000, that movie was very scary. I fell in love with it when my friend showed it to me for the first time. I also found it creepy that it was based on a true story. One of my favorite George C. Scott films.

DarthPanda
09-14-2012, 04:27 AM
You already listed most of them.

But Nightbreed is probably dearest to my squishy black heart, with Dagon a close second. The original Night of the Living Dead, Dawn and Day of the Dead movies were awesome. Tombs of the Blind Dead. Ginger Snaps. A lot of the old Hammer Horror. Pretty much anything with cool monsters or inbred cannibals. I'm not a fan of slashers or torture porn at all, though. Slashers don't do anything for me, and TP usually just makes uncomfortable in a bad way.

ETA: I almost forgot May. With Angela Bettis. The ending... wow. And Dead Alive.

Haggis
09-14-2012, 04:43 AM
A second here for Night of the Living Dead (original). It's the only move that ever actually made me jump.

Chris1981
09-14-2012, 04:47 AM
I just got around to watching the original "Night of the Living Dead." Holy crap, that's an awesome movie.

druid12000
09-14-2012, 06:19 AM
You already listed most of them.

But Nightbreed is probably dearest to my squishy black heart, with Dagon a close second. The original Night of the Living Dead, Dawn and Day of the Dead movies were awesome. Tombs of the Blind Dead. Ginger Snaps. A lot of the old Hammer Horror. Pretty much anything with cool monsters or inbred cannibals. I'm not a fan of slashers or torture porn at all, though. Slashers don't do anything for me, and TP usually just makes uncomfortable in a bad way.

ETA: I almost forgot May. With Angela Bettis. The ending... wow. And Dead Alive.

I'm a huge Clive Barker fan, just watched Hellraiser 1 and 2 again. Nightbreed was great but even Clive Barker said (much like George Lucas with the Star Wars films) that he was so limited by the technology of the time. I would love to see 'Weaveworld' on film. Anyone ever hear of 'Let's Scare Jessica To Death'?

druid12000
09-14-2012, 06:22 AM
The Horde! European zombie flick that was awesome! If you like zombie movies you have to check that out.

jvc
09-14-2012, 06:22 AM
Watership Down. That film freaks the living crap out of me.

BloodSpatterAnalyst
09-14-2012, 06:31 AM
I recently watched a movie entitled VHS.

5 minutes into it i wasn't sure i was going to keep watching, it's one of those "found footage" films. Basically it's five storied all rolled into one. I'm really glad I kept watching it because it was one of the first movies in a long time that actually creeped me out.

DarthPanda
09-14-2012, 06:43 AM
I'm a huge Clive Barker fan, just watched Hellraiser 1 and 2 again. Nightbreed was great but even Clive Barker said (much like George Lucas with the Star Wars films) that he was so limited by the technology of the time. I would love to see 'Weaveworld' on film.

Yeah, I actually wouldn't mind seeing a Nightbreed remake. Could've done a better job with Decker, I think. Cronenberg wasn't tanky enough. Or intimidating enough, really. Eh, it's still one of my favorite movies ever. :D And I'd lop off an arm for a Weaveworld movie. They could break it into two or three parts. Hell, if they can squeeze three films out of The Hobbit, they can get three out of Weaveworld.


Watership Down. That film freaks the living crap out of me.

That movie scarred a generation of tender young minds. Another one of my favorites, though. And Plague Dogs was even more disturbing.

druid12000
09-14-2012, 06:43 AM
An American Haunting. The scene with the daughter 'levitating' and being slapped around was disturbing.

DarthPanda
09-14-2012, 06:47 AM
OMG The Burrowers. Has anybody seen it? I thought it was horrifying. It's a horror Western -- not enough of those, imho. Oh man, I get freaked out thinking about it. But I live waaay out in the woods and have to walk a long way home at night, so I have an excuse. Heh.

ETA: Thought of another one. H. P. Lovecraft's Necronomicon. It's a bunch of different stories, like Creepshow. The third segment was scary as hell, even considering the cheesy effects.

seun
09-14-2012, 01:58 PM
Night of the Living Dead for one simple reason.

It's the greatest film ever made.

KevinG
09-14-2012, 02:57 PM
Okay, I know I am going to have the angry mob with torches and pitchforks at my door any minute now before I go to work but I never seen Night of the Living Dead (the original, not the 1990 remake directed by Tom Savini or the 2006 film with Sid Hag). I always wanted to see it but I never had a chance to.

Could anyone tell me what The Horde!, Watership Down, VHS and the Burrowers are about ? I'm always looking for new horror films to check out.

I personally loved Hellrasier and Hellbound:Hellrasiers II and enjoyed Hellrasier III: Hell on Earth. As for the the direct to DvD sequels I consider them the worse in the bunch. I think Clive Barker is a genius and I been dying (no pun intended) to read the short novella that Hellrasier was based on. For those of you are really die hard Hellrasier fans, I recommend reading the early 90's comic books. Those were not only beautifully drawn but also very creepy and each issue at the end left you with a very unhappy feeling.

Personally I hope they don't go through with the Hellrasier remake. It's bad enough in 2013 we are getting a Carrie (remake (this the third one mind you and they are saying it's going to be a cross between the original and Glee) and Robocop). I have seen the end of Nightbreed and I would love to see more.


Another good horror movie I forgot to add was Clownhouse (1989). It's not gory and in fact it's a very low-budget film directed by the same director of Jeepers Creepers 1 & 2. I highly recommend.

KevinG
09-14-2012, 03:00 PM
I'm a huge Clive Barker fan, just watched Hellraiser 1 and 2 again. Nightbreed was great but even Clive Barker said (much like George Lucas with the Star Wars films) that he was so limited by the technology of the time. I would love to see 'Weaveworld' on film. Anyone ever hear of 'Let's Scare Jessica To Death'?


I have seen Let's Scare Jessica To Death. I actually hated it the first time I saw it. I thought it was a slow and my friend who thinks he's Roger Ebert didn't help (then again this was the same guy who I introduced Suspria to and at first he hated it but watched it on his own and he considers it his favorite horror movie) and I really enjoyed it the second time around. I love the cover art to that movie ;)


Last night I was listening to old school horror movie soundtracks.

The Fog (1980)

and The Wickerman (1973) brilliant.

Haggis
09-14-2012, 03:02 PM
I haven't seen the movie "Watership Down" but I have read the book. Assuming it's the same subject matter, it's about bunny rabbits. :)

Haggis
09-14-2012, 03:04 PM
Night of the Living Dead for one simple reason.

It's the greatest film ever made.

"Yeah, they're dead. They're all messed up.:D

seun
09-14-2012, 03:06 PM
Okay, I know I am going to have the angry mob with torches and pitchforks at my door any minute now before I go to work but I never seen Night of the Living Dead (the original, not the 1990 remake directed by Tom Savini or the 2006 film with Sid Hag). I always wanted to see it but I never had a chance to.

Could anyone tell me what The Horde!, Watership Down, VHS and the Burrowers are about ? I'm always looking for new horror films to check out.


NOTLD is in the public domain so you should be able to pick up a copy really cheap.

La Horde is a French film that is more action horror than 'straight' horror. Basically, a few cops and a few bad guys are trapped in a block of flats while a zombie apocalypse kicks off. They're several floors up and have to work together to get down to the ground and stay alive.
It's very violent and a lot of fun.

Link: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1183276/

alleycat
09-14-2012, 03:12 PM
An American Haunting. The scene with the daughter 'levitating' and being slapped around was disturbing.

The movie was filmed in Europe (Romania), but the events that inspired the movie happened a few miles from where I grew up. I have been to the locations in Robertson County, Tennessee. There is even a Bell Witch monument.

J.S.F.
09-14-2012, 03:22 PM
Of the old movies, Frankenstein, the Spanish version of Dracula (filmed using the same sets as Tod Browning's Dracula, 1931--they filmed at night!) Freaks (also by Browning), and The Body Snatcher, with Boris Karloff.

Modern day, I don't care for zombie flicks all that much although NOTLD (the original) is a classic in its own right, and Shaun of the Dead is hysterical. The first Nightmare on Elm Street, Nightbreed, and Cabin in the Woods (I don't know why it didn't do better at the box office) are all excellent.

No Pinhead, thank you. Clive Barker (yeah, Nightbreed, I know) is a bit overrated.

seun
09-14-2012, 03:38 PM
Special mention to the following:

The Mist. The Descent. The Eye. Elm Street 1. The Thing. Them (the French film from a couple of years ago). Rec 1 & 2. Day of the Dead. Martyrs. 1408. Dracula (1958). The Fog. Zombie Flesh Eaters (just because it makes me laugh). Exorcist 1 & 3. Witchfinder General. The Devil Rides Out. Living Dead at Manchester Morgue.

KevinG
09-14-2012, 03:49 PM
@ seun: yeah. I am hoping it comes out on Blu-ray eventually. I'm sure I can watch it on Youtube or maybe since I won't be doing anything this Halloween I can watch it. Did you like the 1990 remake ? I also love The Exorcist III. I thought it was really good and I wish it got the recognition it deserves.

@Haggis: bunnies you say ? Now I am intrigued lol.The only killer rabbit I saw was in Monty Python and the Holy Grail lol.

@J.S.F.: I apologizes for sounding stupid but what is it about the Spanish version of Dracula (aside from the sets that Browning used is in this film) that you like ? I heard a lot of very good things about it and I plan on seeing it once I get all The Universal Studio Movie Monster films on Blu-ray.

KevinG
09-14-2012, 03:51 PM
I heard Living Dead at Manchester Morgue was a sick flick.

BTW what is everyone's opinions on the Plantium Dune's remakes of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Friday the 13th and A Nightmare on Elm Street ? Like them ? Hate them ? Michael Bay you suck ?

DOH! I forgot Rosemary's Baby. I need to stop making lists really late night.

seun
09-14-2012, 03:53 PM
The 1990 remake is a fair film. Not a classic by any means but worth a watch.

For the most part, though, remakes and I tend to stay away from each other. We don't get on. Especially if Bay is involved.

SirOtter
09-14-2012, 05:16 PM
14) The Creature from The Black Lagoon

If you ever get a chance, catch this one in the original 3-D. It's one of the few films from the first run of 3-D movies where the process really makes a difference. The underwater scenes, with Ricou Browning lurking in the foliage while Julie Adams swims above, then bursts out to stalk her from below - wow! It's rare I jump in my seat, but I did then!

A few classics not on the list -

Dead of Night (1945)
Bluebeard (1944)
The Black Cat (1934)
Black Sabbath
Black Sunday

DarthPanda
09-14-2012, 05:28 PM
Could anyone tell me what The Horde!, Watership Down, VHS and the Burrowers are about ? I'm always looking for new horror films to check out.



Watership Down is an animated children's film based on the Richard Adams book. It is, indeed, about bunny rabbits. It's not a horror movie, but does have some truly horrific visuals. Just look at the poster (http://www.movieposterdb.com/posters/06_11/1978/0078480/l_145734_0078480_61dbc6a7.jpg) (yes, that's a snare around his neck). Some of the reviews on Amazon are from angry parents who had to console crying children after letting their kids watch it without having seen it first themselves. I adore it, and highly recommend it. Don't bother with newer kiddie versions, though. Watch the original.

The Burrowers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Burrowers) is about a rescue party sent to find a missing pioneer family in Dakota. And nocturnal burrowing death-beasts that look like giant mutant mole-crickets. It starts out really slow but gets creepy as hell. And it has Clancy Brown, who is great in everything.

jvc
09-14-2012, 08:03 PM
I haven't seen the movie "Watership Down" but I have read the book. Assuming it's the same subject matter, it's about bunny rabbits. :)
Talking bunny rabbits. :scared:

childeroland
09-14-2012, 08:12 PM
A Tale of Two Sisters. Gorgeously shot, emotionally resonant, terrifying in the conventional ways and in the ways it shows a family unraveling.

Haggis
09-14-2012, 08:18 PM
Talking bunny rabbits. :scared:
Yeah. SRSLY. Way too dark for kids.

Rattigan
09-14-2012, 08:19 PM
Dracula (1958) would be my all-time favourite horror film. Recently read the original novel, and it struck me how much of Jimmy Sangster's script echoed the book so faithfully. Sangster, who sadly died last year, was masterful at adapting books for the cinema. See The Nanny, for example, a supremely creepy Hammer suspense film -- the novel, by Evelyn Piper, was awful, in my opinion. Sangster really did make gold out of shit. (In the case of Dracula, of course, it was gold from gold!)

J.S.F.
09-15-2012, 01:48 AM
@J.S.F.: I apologizes for sounding stupid but what is it about the Spanish version of Dracula (aside from the sets that Browning used is in this film) that you like ? I heard a lot of very good things about it and I plan on seeing it once I get all The Universal Studio Movie Monster films on Blu-ray.

---

First off, there's camera movement, a lot of it, which is very unconventional for 1931. Camerawork back then was very static, lots of straight shots, not many 'tricks'. Browning's version is very much rooted in the theater while the Spanish director seemed more willing to take chances.

Secondly, the actress who played Minna Harker was young (seventeen at the time, I think) and much more 'in your face' than the actress in the Universal version. The costumes the women wore very much sexier (for the time) and the overall result was a more atmospheric 'different' movie. The only drawback was the actor who played Dracula wasn't quite as mesmerizing as Bela Lugosi was but you can't have everything.

If you go on YouTube, you can find the Spanish version (or at least, a couple of months ago you could) and for a serious cinemaphile I think it's worthwhile possessing both versions.

druid12000
09-15-2012, 01:59 AM
I never really considered myself a zombie film freak until 28 Days Later. That movie sucked me in from the start.

SirOtter
09-15-2012, 02:04 AM
Secondly, the actress who played Minna Harker was young (seventeen at the time, I think)

Lupita Tovar was 20, and was a definite improvement over Helen Chandler. Lupita is still alive, at the age of 112. There's one survivor from the English one, Carla Laemmle, who will be 113 in October. She was the passenger in the coach at the beginning, and spoke the first line.

J.S.F.
09-15-2012, 02:37 AM
Lupita Tovar was 20, and was a definite improvement over Helen Chandler. Lupita is still alive, at the age of 112. There's one survivor from the English one, Carla Laemmle, who will be 113 in October. She was the passenger in the coach at the beginning, and spoke the first line.

---

Thanks for the info. I saw an interview with her a number of years ago on YouTube and I think she was around ninety at the time or maybe older--figured she'd passed on by now.

Did not know about Carla Laemmle--checked the Net and yes, as I figured, related to Carl Laemmle, his niece. Very pretty. (She'll be 104 this October, not 113, and Tovar will be 102).

KevinG
09-15-2012, 03:07 AM
@seun: I hate Michael Bay. I didn't like the remakes of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Friday the 13th (especially) and A Nightmare On Elm Street. The only reason why I saw ANOES was because of Jackie Earl Haley, he's one of my favorite actors. One of the reasons why I didn't like the remakes so much, especially ANOES was because it had scenes that were exactly the same as the original. Bay wanted that. The original cut, was completely different until Bay saw it and declared he wanted to be just like the original.

@DarthPanda: Unfortunately the link you showed me didn't work lol. I love Clancy Brown, I love his voice and he's a superb actor, while he is Capt. Byron Hadley in the Shawshank Redemption he will always be Mr. Krabs to me.
Have you or anyone ever seen Return to Oz ? I am getting that kind of vibe with the movie you are talking about. That defiantly wasn't a movie for kids. Don't me wrong, I like it a lot but I couldn't picture little kids seeing it. The beginning has Dorothy going in for shock treatment.

Talking bunny rabbits ? Are they puppets or the cheap CGI ?

@SirOtter: it's funny you say that because Universal Studios in October is releasing a box set of all the movie monsters ON Blu-ray and The Creature from the Black Lagoon is going to be in 3-D in the set. Black Sabbath was a sick film. Mario Bava is a genius.


@J.S.F.: You sold for the Spanish version of Dracula. I was going to wait for the box set since it will be HD and included but since you told me your insights on it I think I found the perfect film to watch whenever I have a chance.

@childeroland: I always was intrigued about the film ever since I saw the poster for it. It listed in the book the 100 horrors movies you must see.

@Rattigan: What is the Nanny about ? Very intrigued:).

KevinG
09-15-2012, 03:09 AM
Has anyone ever seen this movie ?

[link to malware infected site deleted]

Kyra Wright
09-15-2012, 03:13 AM
My favorites are The Thing (the 1982 version) and Hellraiser.

DarthPanda
09-15-2012, 03:43 AM
Has anyone ever seen this movie ?



I've seen (and own) quite a few of Charles Band's wonderful/ridiculous movies. And everything by Stuart Gordon. The version I have is called "Dolls" though. It's the one with the punk girls and the family staying at the old dollmaker's house, right?

Watership Down is old-school hand-drawn animation. Sorry the links didn't work... dunno what went wrong there. Loved Return to Oz. Not the same kind of creepy as Watership Down though.... WD is more brutal reality than creepy-cute. I tried to find a good clip on YouTube, but the only one I could find to give you a proper idea... has been turned into a fecking Marilyn Manson video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5I9izys2ek&feature=fvwrel). :P But it's like a highlight reel of the darker bits. Imagine being a sensitive five-year old and seeing it for the first time. :D

Speaking of creepy rabbits... ever seen Jan Svankmejer's Alice? Nightmare fuel.

Oh! And Company of Wolves.
http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTkyMzA3OTcxN15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNDc4ODAyMQ@@._ V1._SY317_CR5,0,214,317_.jpg
It's another favorite that I watch over and over and over and over. It's based on some of Angela Carter's stories. More surreal than horrific, imho, but it's classified as horror.

KevinG
09-15-2012, 04:12 AM
@DarthPanda: I love and I mean love The Puppet Master series. I love Charles Band's movies, the themes and concepts are usually people shrunken down or turned into a doll, a joint (yes a joint, Evil Bong: II) and other small objects. Yes, Dolls is about the elderly doll maker couple who are actually witches and turn people into dolls. He's actually making a 10th Puppet Master movie. My favorites are part I and III, I also enjoyed II. I have a Blade doll :)

Now I really want to see WD lol. I kind of got a creepy feeling when I saw Return to Oz, especially (at the time I was five lol) and I saw the Wicked Witch with no head running around that aisle with all her heads making different facial expressions. That and Ernest Scared Stupid scared the crap out of me and The Neverending Story.

I heard about Alice but I haven't seen it. I heard it's a real trippy flick. I believe it's on Netflix.

A Company of Wolves is a classic :)

@Kyra Wright: I love the Thing. My favorite line is at the very end when Kurt Russel looks at the monster, it growls and he goes "yeah well f*** you to!" Lmfao.

J.S.F.
09-15-2012, 04:35 AM
Bubba Hotep. Bruce Campbell and Ossie Davis are perfect. It isn't so much a horror flick as it is a rather whacked out observation on aging and mortality, but the acting is SO good you're drawn into it in spite of the ridiculous premise.

Directed by Don Coscarelli, the creator the Phantasm movies, it's a lot better than I thought it would be with a lot of clever touches. Worth seeing. I wish I had the DVD (they don't sell it in Japan and I'm not even sure they actually put out a DVD).

Rhoda Nightingale
09-15-2012, 04:48 AM
Bubba Hotep is terrific--really took me by surprise. I mean, I'm always game when Bruce Campbell is involved, but that one exceeded my every expectation. Very moving film, despite the absurdity of the plot.

Favorite horror film of all time: Jacob's Ladder. Full stop. Love that movie.

I'm working on compiling a Top 31 list to post on my blog, one a day for October, but I haven't quite worked out where to put them all.

On the list somewhere are:

A Tale of Two Sisters
Near Dark
The Ring
The Others
Children of the Corn
Night of the Living Dead
Gojira (that's the original, Japanese-language one--subtitled, not dubbed)
The Sixth Sense
Lost Boys
Interview with the Vampire
Sleepy Hollow
Poltergeist
The Evil Dead (the whole trilogy, really, but the first is the only one that properly scared me)
A Clockwork Orange


...it's a list in progress.

DarthPanda
09-15-2012, 04:59 AM
Bubba Hotep. Bruce Campbell and Ossie Davis are perfect. It isn't so much a horror flick as it is a rather whacked out observation on aging and mortality, but the acting is SO good you're drawn into it in spite of the ridiculous premise.

Directed by Don Coscarelli, the creator the Phantasm movies, it's a lot better than I thought it would be with a lot of clever touches. Worth seeing. I wish I had the DVD (they don't sell it in Japan and I'm not even sure they actually put out a DVD).

Bubba Hotep was great. I was pleasantly surprised, too.

Speaking of Don Coscarelli... anybody else a fan of John Dies at the End? It's a horror-comedy novel -- one of my favorite books ever. Coscarelli directed the movie but they keep pushing back the release date and it's making me crazy. Clancy Brown is it, too. *le sigh*

KevinG
09-15-2012, 05:24 AM
I actually own a Bubba Ho-tep and Sebastian Haff action figure. They are kept in their clam shell boxes hanging on my wall as they were part of a collectible action figure line series called Cult Classics. They came with bases that connected.

They actually released a special collector's edition DvD of Bubba Ho-tep which the packaging was Sebastian's Elvis's outfit. Both DvD's are out of print. I had the original DvD but had to sell it due to cash. I hope they not only release the film on Blu-ray but also go forward with the sequel, which I heard Paul Gimatti is attached to the project, if and when it ever gets made.

I never heard of John Dies at the End but I do love The Phantasm films. I also have a Tall Man action figure and the soundtrack on my Ipod.

@Rhoda Nightingale: I really dig your list. Please let me know when it's complete so I can read it :) I didn't know A Clockwork Orange was considered a horror movie.

Rhoda Nightingale
09-15-2012, 05:28 AM
@Rhoda Nightingale: I really dig your list. Please let me know when it's complete so I can read it :) I didn't know A Clockwork Orange was considered a horror movie.

Thanks! :) Eh, I kind of go back and forth on Clockwork Orange. I consider it a futuristic dystopia myself, but I've found it shelved under both sci-fi and horror, depending on where I am at the time. Either way, it is one of my favorite movies, so on the list it goes.

This is blog where I talk about horror movies: Halloween Candy (http://candycorncomm.livejournal.com). It's a moderated community; all the posts by "rhoda-rants" are me.

DarthPanda
09-15-2012, 05:32 AM
*Paul Giamatti and Angus Scrimm are both in JDatE, btw. And Doug Jones.

The trailer (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=my9Pr-W92SM) isn't that gripping, but it's a hard story to summarize in two minutes. Giamatti has said in interviews that he loved it, so I have hope it did the book justice. :)

Rhoda Nightingale
09-15-2012, 05:34 AM
^Wow. That's quite a cast. I don't really associate Paul Giamatti with horror, but he's a terrific actor.

SirOtter
09-15-2012, 06:18 AM
Did not know about Carla Laemmle--checked the Net and yes, as I figured, related to Carl Laemmle, his niece. Very pretty. (She'll be 104 this October, not 113, and Tovar will be 102).

Doh! Good thing I decided against pursuing that career as a math teacher. Not my strong suit, obviously.

AnneGlynn
09-15-2012, 06:21 AM
OH MAN!!!! I cannot believe I completely forgot about The Changeling!!!!

My fave, without a doubt. Although The Ring made me jump, too.

Kyla Laufreyson
09-15-2012, 06:21 AM
On the whole my favorite horror movie is Sleepy Hollow. For nostalgia-sake I'd have to go with either From Dusk Till Dawn (watched when I was 5...my parents had questionable judgement) or Scream 3 (saw in theaters around the age of 7).

Lately though my favorite would have to be Cabin in the Woods. All of my love for that movie.

SirOtter
09-15-2012, 06:25 AM
@SirOtter: it's funny you say that because Universal Studios in October is releasing a box set of all the movie monsters ON Blu-ray and The Creature from the Black Lagoon is going to be in 3-D in the set. Black Sabbath was a sick film. Mario Bava is a genius.

Hooray! Won't be quite the same as on a big screen, I'm sure, but it'll do. :D

Agreed on Bava, for both Black Sabbath and Black Sunday, the latter of which is IMHO the sicker of the two, in every sense of the word I can think of. :) Love 'em both.

SirOtter
09-15-2012, 06:37 AM
On the whole my favorite horror movie is Sleepy Hollow. For nostalgia-sake I'd have to go with either From Dusk Till Dawn (watched when I was 5...my parents had questionable judgement) or Scream 3 (saw in theaters around the age of 7).

The films I remember seeing at five years of age in the theater were The Pit and the Pendulum with Vincent Price, which I remember fondly and still enjoy, and Reptilicus, an absolutely dreadful Danish Godzilla rip-off, which I recall with much less enthusiasm. Also the original Nutty Professor, with Jerry Lewis, which isn't really a horror film, but his version of Buddy Love was closer to Mr. Hyde than Eddie Murphy's used car salesman take on the alternate character. I was not amused.

1963 was also in the middle of the Universal revival, when all the classic horrors of the 30s and 40s were released to television. I used to get up super early on Saturday mornings to catch movies like The Werewolf of London and Son of Frankenstein, and saw most of the rest after school on the local afternoon movie on Channel Five. Good times.

Kyla Laufreyson
09-15-2012, 06:53 AM
The films I remember seeing at five years of age in the theater were The Pit and the Pendulum with Vincent Price, which I remember fondly and still enjoy, and Reptilicus, an absolutely dreadful Danish Godzilla rip-off, which I recall with much less enthusiasm.
My favorite with Vincent Price is the original House on Haunted Hill. Now I want to watch it...but all I have on hand is the remake. (Granted I love that one as well, so I might as well go with it.)

SirOtter
09-15-2012, 07:03 AM
I looked again, but didn't see a single Val Lewton RKO picture from the mid-40s on the original list. Blasphemy!

Cat People
Curse of the Cat People
The Body Snatcher
Isle of the Dead
Bedlam
The Leopard Man
The Seventh Victim

Skibone21
09-15-2012, 11:15 AM
I was actually going to suggest "The Body Snatcher" as well since it's on a DVD I have with another one I like even more "I Walked With a Zombie" from 1943. I'm not a very big horror fan but "Eyes Without Face" from 1959 is a great movie in general and kind of disturbing. The eerie score is what really does it for me and you hear it from the opening credits. I also like "The Wolf Man" from 1941. In more recent times I'd have to say I like "The People Under The Stairs." "The Picture of Dorian Gray" 1945 is also a great movie. It's more of a drama I think but I believe it'd be classified as a horror film. The last one I'd suggest is "House of Wax" with Vincent Price.

J.S.F.
09-15-2012, 12:53 PM
Talking about old flicks, White Zombie (1932 with Bela Lugosi) is the granddaddy of all zombie flicks. In the public domain, you can see the print on YouTube but it isn't very good. However, it's an excellent film in its own right.

Island of Lost Souls with Charles Laughton and again, Lugosi, has remarkable makeup.

Queen of Spades with Anton Diffring and someone mentioned The Night My Number Came Up. If they didn't, it should be mentioned here. Clever flick, more suggestive than horrifying although the end result is still unsettling.

More modern stuff, I have to go with the original Child's Play. You know that damn doll is gonna come alive when the mother turns it around and finds out there's no battery but when it does...great stuff!

Cat People never should have been remade. Too perfect, and way ahead of its time. Simone Simone actually looked like a cat and played her part perfectly, and excellent low-budget flick which nevertheless delivered the big-budget thrills in every respect.

Rattigan
09-15-2012, 02:46 PM
@Rattigan: What is the Nanny about ? Very intrigued:).
It's a thriller about the escalating conflict between a family nanny and a troubled 10-year-old boy, each blaming the other for the death of his baby sister. The film's tagline was "Who would you trust... the nanny or the boy?" Bette Davis plays the title character, in her Baby Jane era, so 'nuff said!

Rattigan
09-15-2012, 02:48 PM
SirOtter, those Val Lewton pictures from the 1940s are among the most atmospheric horror films ever. Universal may have had the big-name monsters, but for sheer creepy, shit-your-pants atmosphere, RKO had the goods.

warofthesparks
09-15-2012, 06:20 PM
It's a thriller about the escalating conflict between a family nanny and a troubled 10-year-old boy, each blaming the other for the death of his baby sister. The film's tagline was "Who would you trust... the nanny or the boy?" Bette Davis plays the title character, in her Baby Jane era, so 'nuff said!


Saw The Nanny a couple months ago. Nothing like Bette in her Jane era.

SirOtter
09-15-2012, 06:43 PM
I was actually going to suggest "The Body Snatcher" as well since it's on a DVD I have with another one I like even more "I Walked With a Zombie" from 1943. I'm not a very big horror fan but "Eyes Without Face" from 1959 is a great movie in general and kind of disturbing.

Ack! Can't believe I forgot about I Walked With a Zombie. Eyes Without a Face is a great film, truly. It can also be found under its French title, Les Yeux Sans Visage. Diabolique is another terrific French horror film from the 50s.

In the early to mid 40s, Columbia made a number of pretty good b-pictures based on radio shows. The Whistler series, starring Richard Dix, is being shown on TCM currently, about one a week. The three films based on I Love a Mystery were really mysteries, but had creepy elements that verged on horror.

I wish I could recommend the six Universals based in the Inner Sanctum radio show, starring Lon Chaney Jr., but they just aren't very good. The best of the bad lot is Weird Woman, based on Fritz Leiber's novel, Conjure Wife. A much better version is the British Night of the Eagle.

SirOtter
09-15-2012, 06:52 PM
Cat People never should have been remade. Too perfect, and way ahead of its time. Simone Simone actually looked like a cat and played her part perfectly, and excellent low-budget flick which nevertheless delivered the big-budget thrills in every respect.

Amen that! Simone was in another great film that should be on this list, The Devil and Daniel Webster.

CrastersBabies
09-15-2012, 07:00 PM
I highly recommend 'The Changeling'. One of the only movies that actually gave me the willies.

True horror at its best, imho. That wheelchair. The ball. The bathtub. Holy cow. Best "seance" scene ever, too. :)

I love the Exorcist (but of course! kisses fingers)
Prince of Darkness. Probably super cheesy now and did not age well, but I don't care.
The Changeling rocked
First Nightmare on Elm Street
The Shining (Jack N. version)
The Thing (80s version)

Not really into the oldies (before 1960). I don't mind remakes. I eat late 60s, 70s and 80s horror up. Yum!

Six Alaric
09-15-2012, 07:28 PM
Don't Look Now
Ringu
Strange Circus
Audition
Psycho
The Faculty
Peeping Tom
The Innocents
A Tale of Two Sisters

Couldn't pick just one. :D

It's difficult to discuss most of those without throwing spoilers all over the place. I've always hated knowing the twists of Psycho before seeing it and worry about ruining someone else's viewing experience in the same way.

druid12000
09-15-2012, 07:35 PM
True horror at its best, imho. That wheelchair. The ball. The bathtub. Holy cow. Best "seance" scene ever, too. :)

I love the Exorcist (but of course! kisses fingers)
Prince of Darkness. Probably super cheesy now and did not age well, but I don't care.
The Changeling rocked
First Nightmare on Elm Street
The Shining (Jack N. version)
The Thing (80s version)

Not really into the oldies (before 1960). I don't mind remakes. I eat late 60s, 70s and 80s horror up. Yum!

The twin girls were perfectly cast. The image of them standing in the hall asking Danny if he wants to play is forever burned into my psyche and is creeping me out as I write this.

SirOtter
09-15-2012, 08:21 PM
Here's my ultimate horror film list, winnowed down to the bare minimum required for a collection suitable for the discriminating horror film fan. Not much modern stuff, but then I've seen very little lately that was worth the price of admission. I prefer being scared rather than nauseated. A fine distinction, I know, but it's mine. I'm sure I've forgotten quite a few, but the wonder of the internet is that more can be added when they occur to me.

At some point, when I get more time, I plan to go down this list and discuss a few of these. Some selections may seem out of place on this list, but I assure you they are here for a reason, and whenever I get around to it, I shall expound upon my decision to include them.

20 Million Miles to Earth
Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein
The Abominable Dr. Phibes
An American Werewolf in London
El Angel Exterminador
Arsenic and Old Lace
Asylum
The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms
The Beast With Five Fingers
Bedlam
La Belle et la Bete
The Birds
The Black Cat
Black Sabbath
Black Sunday
Blithe Spirit
The Blob
Bluebeard
The Body Snatcher
Bride of Frankenstein
Brides of Dracula
A Bucket of Blood
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
Captain Kronos, Vampire Slayer
Carnival of Souls
The Cat and the Canary
Cat People
The Changeling
The Collector
Countess Dracula
The Creature from the Black Lagoon
The Curse of Frankenstein
Curse of the Cat People
Curse of the Demon/Night of the Demon
Curse of the Werewolf
Dead of Night
The Devil Rides Out
The Devil's Backbone
Diabolique
Doctor X
Don't Look Now
Dr. Cyclops
Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde
Dr. Mabuse der Spieler
Dr. Phibes Rises Again
Dr. Terror's House of Horrors
Dracula
Dracula (Spanish)
Dracula, Prince of Darkness
Dracula's Daughter
Dragonwyck
Eating Raoul
Experiment in Terror
The Face Behind the Mask
Faust
Fermat's Room
Fiend Without a Face
The Fly
Frankenstein
Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man
Freaks
Frenzy
Gaslight
The Ghost and Mr. Chicken
The Ghost Breakers
Gojira
Halloween
The Hands of Orlac
Hangover Square
The Haunting
Homicidal
Horror of Dracula
The Hospital
House of Usher
House of Wax
The House on Haunted Hill
The House That Dripped Blood
The Howling
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
The Hunger
Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte
I Bury the Living
I Married a Witch
I Walked With a Zombie
Innocent Blood
Invasion of the Body Snatchers
The Invisible Man
The Invisible Man Returns
The Invisible Ray
Island of Lost Souls
Isle of the Dead
Ju-On (The Grudge)
King Kong
Kwaidan
The Legend of Hell House
The Leopard Man
The Lodger
Les Yeux Sans Visage
M
Mad Love
The Man Who Laughs
The Mask of Fu Manchu
Masque of the Red Death
Monsieur Verdoux
The Mummy
Mystery of the Wax Museum
Night of the Eagle
Night of the Hunter
Night of the Living Dead
Nosferatu
The Old Dark House
Orphee
Pandora's Box
Peeping Tom
The Penalty
The Phantom of the Opera
The Picture of Dorian Gray
The Pit and the Pendulum
Psycho
The Raven
Repulsion
The Return of Dracula
Return of the Vampire
The Revenge of Frankenstein
The Sadist
Scrooge
The Seventh Victim
Shaun of the Dead
Son of Dracula
Son of Frankenstein
Son of Kong
Spider Baby
The Spiral Staircase
Tales From the Crypt
Tarantula
Targets
Theatre of Blood
Them!
Thesis
They Drive By Night
Thirteen Ghosts
Throne of Blood
The Tomb of Ligeia
Topper Returns
Tremors
Trilogy of Terror
The Uninvited (1944)
The Unknown (1927)
Vampyr
Vault of Horror
Waxworks (1924)
Werewolf of London
West of Zanzibar (1928)
Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?
White Zombie
The Wicker Man
Willard
The Witchfinder General
The Wolf Man
You'll Find Out
Young Frankenstein

Haggis
09-15-2012, 08:30 PM
The twin girls were perfectly cast. The image of them standing in the hall asking Danny if he wants to play is forever burned into my psyche and is creeping me out as I write this.
:evil

http://i116.photobucket.com/albums/o15/Damnhaggis/the-shining-twins.jpg

druid12000
09-15-2012, 08:46 PM
:scared:

Skibone21
09-15-2012, 11:13 PM
Here's my ultimate horror film list, winnowed down to the bare minimum required for a collection suitable for the discriminating horror film fan. Not much modern stuff, but then I've seen very little lately that was worth the price of admission. I prefer being scared rather than nauseated. A fine distinction, I know, but it's mine. I'm sure I've forgotten quite a few, but the wonder of the internet is that more can be added when they occur to me.

At some point, when I get more time, I plan to go down this list and discuss a few of these. Some selections may seem out of place on this list, but I assure you they are here for a reason, and whenever I get around to it, I shall expound upon my decision to include them.



I thought about suggesting Gaslight and Arsenic and Old Lace myself because they're eerie in different ways. Especially since Arsenic and Old Lace is a comedy. What do you think of Dragonwyck? Have you watched both versions of Gaslight?

SirOtter
09-15-2012, 11:30 PM
I thought about suggesting Gaslight and Arsenic and Old Lace myself because they're eerie in different ways. Especially since Arsenic and Old Lace is a comedy. What do you think of Dragonwyck? Have you watched both versions of Gaslight?

I like Dragonwyck, although it is abit derivitive of several other gothics, particularly Gaslight, with a bit of Jane Eyre and Rebecca thrown in for good measure. Vincent Price is, as always, a delight to watch in this sort of role.

I've seen both Gaslights, and I'm torn between the two. I thnk the American verion is technically better, in terms of lighting and cinematography, and of course Ingrid Bergman is incredible in her role. On the other hand, I like Anton Walbrook in the British version over Charles Boyer in the American, by a significant margin. Boyer so underplayed it as to be almost catatonic, whereas Walbrook brings just the right level of maniacal intensity to the role. I find the same problem in regards to the American remake of Pepe le Moko. Jean Gabin was so much better in the same role as Boyer in Algiers, but I like Hedy Lamarr better in the American version.

Arsenic and Old Lace is one of several I was unsure could really be called horror, although being a comedy as well should be no impediment. Which reminds me, I need to add Young Frankenstein to the list. The presence of Peter Lorre, and very acceptable substitution of Raymond Masey for Boris Karloff convinced me there was no reason to not include it. There are several comedies on the list - both the silent and Bob Hope versions of Cat & the Canary, for example - but when the comedy arises from frightful situations, I have no trouble calling them horror, as well.

SirOtter
09-15-2012, 11:59 PM
In case there's anyone other than Skibone (thanks for the reminder on Dragonwyck) paying attention, I'm continually adding films to my list. I ought to explain my last addition of Topper Returns, but not the other two films in the series, Topper and Topper Takes a Trip. All three feature ghosts, but only the last one has any elements of suspense or fright. In the other two, the ghosts are purely there to set up comedic situations, without there being much in the way of scares for the audience. Delightful films, but not horrific.

I also added another film based on a book by Thorne Smith, I Married a Witch. Smith is one of my favorite writers, and it's a damned shame the film of Night Life of the Gods does not appear to have survived. Not that it would be on this list, but the book is such a delight it deserves a mention.

SirOtter
09-16-2012, 12:28 AM
I will offer to you a confession,
I like movies that give me a fright.
If the subject is horror
I've got to have more, or
I won't be contented all night.
You may call it a ghoulish obsession.
It's a subject on which I get chatty.
And the worst of the things
Haunting all of my reams
Was the Cockroach That Ate Cincinnatti.

There are ghouls and hobgoblins and witches,
And moth-eaten werewolves with bangs.
There are creatures that clatter
And other that chatter
And Japanese monsters with fangs.
Frankenstein gives me the shakes,
And Count Dracula's drivng m batty,
But they're not on a par
With the worst one by far,
The Cockroach That Ate Cincinnatti.

Oh, he must've needed a seltzer,
It's amazing how much he got down.
For lunch he'd just chew
Up a suburb or two
And for dinner he ate the whole town.

Willard just sent me out laughing.
I thouht Ben just a little bit ratty.
They're not half as bad
As the worst scare I've had,
The Cockroach That Ate Cincinnatti.

Oh, my heart nearly stopped,
He will never be topped,
The Cockroach That Ate Cincinnatti!

Rose & the Arrangement, courtesy of Dr. Demento

Stacia Kane
09-16-2012, 12:32 AM
I highly recommend 'The Changeling'. One of the only movies that actually gave me the willies.


True horror at its best, imho. That wheelchair. The ball. The bathtub. Holy cow. Best "seance" scene ever, too. :)




I think this is one of the most genuinely creepy/scary movies ever made. I love it. I've seen it at least a dozen or so times, and it still creeps me the hell out, every time.

One day I was alone in my kitchen and for no reason I started thinking about it, and hearing the seance lady's voice asking "Are you the child who was killed by the coal cart?" The way she says it...the way it made me think of the rest of the movie (and you forgot "the boy in the floor")... *shudder* I had to go watch something funny for like an hour to get it out of my head.

GREAT scary movie.

J.S.F.
09-16-2012, 01:33 AM
Stacia Kane mentioned the word "seance" and it stirred my memory to a very fine and seldom seen flick, Seance on a Wet Afternoon with Kim Stanley. Not horror per se but a meditative look on madness. Very fine acting.

If you want sick, go to the flick that started the whole slasher thing off, Psycho. Good acting but the musical score, jittery and staccato in tone, really underscored what could have been a 'B' movie but under Hitchcock, became a modern classic in sick.

Peeping Tom should be included in anyone's list.

I'd be remiss if I didn't include my favourite B, C, D, and Z director, Edgar Ulmer. The Black Cat had great sets, a really whacked out storyline, and two horror greats, Lugosi and Karloff, at their finest. Ulmer also directed Bluebeard, one of the finest films John Carradine ever acted in. Great sets and mise-en-scene in this film. (Unfortunately, the print is badly damaged). If they ever did a biographic movie of Ulmer, Eugene Levy would be perfect in the role. (There is a remarkable resemblance).

SirOtter
09-16-2012, 01:41 AM
I'd be remiss if I didn't include my favourite B, C, D, and Z director, Edgar Ulmer. The Black Cat had great sets, a really whacked out storyline, and two horror greats, Lugosi and Karloff, at their finest. Ulmer also directed Bluebeard, one of the finest films John Carradine ever acted in. Great sets and mise-en-scene in this film. (Unfortunately, the print is badly damaged). If they ever did a biographic movie of Ulmer, Eugene Levy would be perfect in the role. (There is a remarkable resemblance).

The tragedy of Ulmer is that he was all set to become a major director, and would've been a great one, but he got caught in the sack with the wife of one of his bosses at Universal (Laemmle Jr., IIRC) after he made The Black Cat & found himself blacklisted out of the major studios. He spent the rest of his days making silk purses out of sow's ears at Poverty Row studios like PRC, the lowest of the low. BTW, he married the young lady with whom he was dallying, and they had a long and happy marriage. Apart from the whole ruined career thing, that is.

rugcat
09-16-2012, 01:54 AM
Yeah. SRSLY. Way too dark for kids.Watership Down is simply brilliant. Richard Adams had trouble selling the ms though -- the general reaction was "who the hell are you writing this for?


The novel began as stories that Adams told his daughters on long car rides to Stratford-upon-Avon. He submitted his manuscript to many publishers, but they rejected it time and time again. Adams was about to hire a vanity publisher to produce a few copies when a small time publisher named Rex Collings accepted Watership Down for a 2,000-copy run. It has since sold millions of copies.

http://www.neatorama.com/2012/05/18/10-facts-you-might-not-know-about-watership-down/

I'm a big fan of the original silent (1922) film Nosferatu, back when vampires were horrible monsters, not suave Counts or sparkly teenagers. The scenes aboard ship where the crew is decimated day after day are horrifying.

http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r33/rugcat/nosferatu2.jpg

In modern times, I'd vote for Roman's Polanski's Repulsion. Not strictly a horror film, but a portrait of the descent into madness -- all too real in a disturbing and very visceral way.

J.S.F.
09-16-2012, 02:00 AM
The tragedy of Ulmer is that he was all set to become a major director, and would've been a great one, but he got caught in the sack with the wife of one of his bosses at Universal (Laemmle Jr., IIRC) after he made The Black Cat & found himself blacklisted out of the major studios. He spent the rest of his days making silk purses out of sow's ears at Poverty Row studios like PRC, the lowest of the low. BTW, he married the young lady with whom he was dallying, and they had a long and happy marriage. Apart from the whole ruined career thing, that is.
---

Yeah, I read his bio. (Also a fascinating book is out there, Kings of the B's--can't remember the author, though). His wife often served as his assistant in his daily directing chores, and even when he made total stinkers--I think he worked for Monogram directing Westerns, if sources are to be believed--he did his best to get them right.

Some of his ethnic films are absolutely incredible, especially the Yiddish films he made with David Opatashu (best known for his role as the Klingon commander in the old Star Trek series). Ulmer really was one of a kind.

Among my faves of his are:

The Black Cat
The Light Ahead
Strange Illusion
Detour (the best of all, IMO)
The Man from Planet X
St. Benny the Dip, a very odd film noir comedy, which predated the film We're No Angels (but not the stage play, I think).

Loved his quote: "I really am looking for absolution in all things I had to do for money's sake."

TWallace
09-18-2012, 01:23 AM
I too like Vincent Price's work in House on Haunted Hill and The Wax Museum. I also like most any film based on Stephen King's work (The Shining (original), Cat's Eye (based on several short stories I had for reading assignment this semester for Engl 1301), Rose Red (I like the idea of the vampire being a house and not a former person!). I see most of the favorites happen to be classics and in those I am greatly lacking. There is one movie that I watched, as an adult mind you, that I turned off because I couldn't finish it alone. Amityville Horror with Margot Kidder and James Brolin. It freaked me out. I like paranormal movies, slasher flicks but I really devour the creepy ones (demonic possession, ghosts and the like).

Rhoda Nightingale
09-18-2012, 02:35 AM
Mmm, Vincent Price.... I could listen to that man read the Encyclopedia.

DarthPanda
09-18-2012, 02:40 AM
Just thought of one that almost gave me an anxiety attack.... The Descent.

Al Stevens
09-18-2012, 04:23 AM
Beetlejuice
Sixth Sense
The Fool Killer
The Three Stooges Meet ...

mrsmig
09-18-2012, 04:47 AM
I have to second SirOtter's vote for The Haunting (the 1963 original, not the execrable 1999 remake). It hasn't aged particularly well - some of the camera work is rather self-consciously arty, in the early sixties fashion - but what makes it stand out is that the viewer never sees what is causing all the disturbances. There's no unveiling of whatever it is that haunts Hill House - that's left up to our imagination (the greatest special effect of all).

I'm also a big fan of The Sixth Sense and wish that M. Night Shyamalan would get his horror jones back. Signs, The Village and even The Lady in the Water and The Happening had such potential, and then just sort of fell apart at the seams.

Al Stevens
09-18-2012, 03:51 PM
Village of the Damned - the 1960 original
The Others