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View Full Version : Police officer's gun stolen by his own kid--but how?



Windcutter
08-14-2012, 04:25 AM
Hi. The phrasing is so awkward, but the point is: I have a teenage character whose mother is a police officer. She's very, very busy, almost never at home. The teen needs to get her gun--and keep it. For several days at least.

So, if he just stole it and hid it somewhere, it wouldn't work, right? Like, she wakes up, her gun is gone, she knows it was there yesterday--there ought to be loads of noise and she'll immediately know someone in her family took it.
But... but but. Maybe? If, say, he stole it and hid it outside of their house without anyone knowing. How soon would the dust settle when the gun isn't found? She'd have lots of trouble because of "losing" it, right?

Another version of mine was that she has some sort of trophy gun, keeps it in the safe, and her son happened to watch her when she was locking it, so he knows the code. But there wouldn't be any bullets kept next to it, right? Which is a problem.

Basically what I'd love to know is how the police officers are supposed to keep/guard their weapons when at home.

alleycat
08-14-2012, 04:44 AM
It would be easier if the kid got a gun somewhere else; for example, perhaps he has a friend whose father is not as careful about keeping his guns locked up.

veinglory
08-14-2012, 04:45 AM
It couldn't be her service weapon unless she is very negligent. I would suggest it be a personal weapon that she would not check on regularly.

cornflake
08-14-2012, 05:29 AM
It can't be her service weapon. She'd notice, yes, and she's not going to be like 'well, I'll find it later,' It'll be in the lockbox she put it in when she got home and took it off. She has kids.

If it isn't there, she's finding it, now. It's not like showing up at work without your uniform pin and hoping someone won't notice.

The rest depends on what state you're in, as to whether it's possible or likely there's another weapon in the house.

Windcutter
08-14-2012, 06:14 AM
I bet she'd notice. :) It's like, is it possible for him to steal it and be able to walk around freely for a few days (about a week) later--or he'd be drugged into a police station and questioned non-stop because he'd be the prime suspect?

She doesn't even have to be a police officer, actually. She isn't important for the plot at all, she is absent most of the time. It's just that simply having a gun at home for no reason would be seen as awfully convenient, wouldn't it?

I'm actually familiar with firearms and their storage, but not the handguns. But logging around a rifle is yuck plot-wise, I need a pretty small weapon.

It seems I'll have to go with gun-at-home-for-no-reason, though...

Trebor1415
08-14-2012, 06:22 AM
Is this is in the U.S? My thoughts would be different if this was for the U.K. for example.

In the U.S. it would be likely that a police officer would have more than one gun. Many, although not all, police officers own personal guns in addition to the department issue service pistol.

I don't have a problem with what you call "A gun at home for no reason." Her reason could be anything: Maybe she likes guns and prefers this gun to her service pistol for target shooting. Maybe she sometimes competes and this pistol is better for competition than her issue pistol. Maybe it was a gift or maybe she inherited it.

As to how she could store it, there are a TON of small, relatively inexpensive "gun safes" designed to store one or two handguns. They have a variety of lock choices ranging from simple tumblers to touch pads to fingerprint sensors.

Unfortunately, many of the less expensives handgun safes have locks that can be easily defeated. There are Youtube videos that show how. It's not hard if you know the trick. (The same goes for trigger locks, btw. They are amazingly easy to pick or pry off.)

So, it wouldn't be a stretch for her to have an "extra" pistol (or more) that her son gets access to. Just dont make it her service pistol, because she'd be more likely to notice that was gone and it would raise more of an issue if it turns up missing.

cornflake
08-14-2012, 07:22 AM
It also, if she's a cop - and again, it depends on where this is how likely or possible it is that anyone would have a gun in the home, including a cop having a secondary handgun - would have to be kept someplace else, otherwise same problem, she's going to notice the second she gets home and pulls the box down to put her service weapon away.

So if you're doing cop with another weapon, put it in a second lockbox that she never looks at. Maybe her father was also a cop and gave her his old gun when she joined the force but I dunno, she wanted something lighter so (in a state in which this isn't a thing, though easier for cops everyplace), she got a new service weapon and kept that in the box it came in.

Windcutter
08-14-2012, 07:56 AM
It's in the U.S. but I don't provide an exact location, so it could be pretty much anywhere save for very weather-specific places like Las Vegas. It's like: small-ish town (not tiny), woods, sometimes it rains. The town's name is made up.

Thanks a lot!

Trebor1415
08-14-2012, 08:15 AM
I was thinking of this a bit more. Let me ask a few questions.

Once again, I am assuming this is in the U.S.

How long has the mom been a cop? Is this the only department she worked at?

Does anyone else live in the house? Dad, other siblings, etc?

How old is the kid who takes the gun? Up until now has he been a "good kid" or a kid who gets into trouble? Basically, how trustworthy has he been up to now?

All this effects the scenario.

Assuming you don't want her to be "into guns" outside of having her have them as part of her job I can still think of some easy reasons she'd have a second pistol.

If she's been a cop for at least a few years her department may have upgraded their handguns in that time. Departments do buy new pistols from time to time for various reasons. Sometimes it's to change to a larger (or smaller) caliber, or to switch from revolvers to semi-autos (mostly done back in the 80's and 90's) or just because the old guns have been in service for 10 years or so and are starting to get worn out (from use in training, etc).

Many departments will give officers a chance to buy their old service pistol when the department upgrades to a new pistol. The officers pay the department directly (some do buy them and some don't). For the officers who don't buy their pistol the department sells the old guns to the firearms distributer in exchange for a discount on the new guns. The old guns are then resold in normal commercial firearms sales channels.

Heck, not all departments issue weapons themselves. In many departments the officer must purchase their own pistol from a list of "approved weapons" and is also responsible for buying extra magazines, holster and belt, etc. The list of approved weapons might be as short as "one" (You must purchase a Glock 22 .40 and a minimum of three mags, for example) to a list of typically no more than five or six approved choices.

For departments that require officers to buy their own and pick from a list of "approved pistols" that list may change over time. In some cases new pistols may be added that offer "better" features (more ammo capacity, larger caliber, etc) and in other cases older pistol types may be removed from the list due to known problems with the guns (history of malfunctions) or because the department has decided to standardize on a new caliber or specific brand of gun, etc. (Old list might have allowed 9mm, but change was made to only allow .40 S&W, etc).

Sometimes officers who purchased guns on the old approved list are allowed to keep using them even after the list is changed under a "grandfather clause." Other times the department may not allow that, or any, exception for whatever reason.

So, let's say her department required her to buy her own pistol. She did and used it for a few years. They then decided to make a change from 9mm to .40 S&W and required all the officers to buy the new guns within a certain time frame (say 6 months).

Many of the officers would offset the cost of buying a new pistol by selling the old pistol. But, not all officers will sell their old gun. Some may just want it, some may decide to sell it later when the local market is not as saturated with that particular type of pistol (because of all the cops selling theirs) and some may just not want the hassle of selling it and stick it in the gun safe or the back of the closet.

So, just have her still have her old gun. Make it the 9mm version of her current pistol (which is likely a .40 S&W) and have her not have sold it for whatever reason. (Maybe she liked it better, or wanted to use it for practice since the ammo is cheaper or just didn't want the hassle, whatever)

That brings me to storage. If her kid has always been trustworthy, and there is no one else to worry about (younger sister, etc) she may just have stuck it in it's orginal box and put it on a shelf in the closet. If she wanted to secure it she could slip a little luggage padlock through a hole in the box handle that is there for that purpose or used a larger padlock to hold the handle closes. It's an easy and cheap way to secure the pistol without buying a little gun safe.

Unfortunately, those little luggage padlocks are pretty easy to open and even easier to cut off. Even a "real" padlock can be defeated if you are determined. (Google "lock bumping") And, it might be as simple as the son knowing where she keeps the key! (Don't laugh, that's all too likely).

Just trying to give you a scenario where a cop who's not "into guns" might have a second pistol that she won't notice is missing for quite awhile, unless and until she has a reason to check.

There's still also the possiblity that she bought it because she wanted it, or it was a gift or inheritance, etc.

Trebor1415
08-14-2012, 08:27 AM
A couple of things I forgot and saw when I reread your question.

Unless the officer is in a very anti-gun area, say NYC or LA, there likely wouldn't be any restriction on how they store any gun OUTSIDE of their "duty sidearm."

In other words, there wouldn't be a legal requirement that they store any other guns in a safe or lockbox. As to the duty gun, the regulation is likely to require that it be kept "Secure from unauthorized access" but likely won't get into any more detail than that. Again, not a specific requirement to have a safe, etc. just a general duty to keep it "out of the wrong hands."

So, if the gun is NOT her duty pistol, she wouldn't be required to take any more than normal precauctions. Stuck in a case in the back of the closet, possibly with a padlock on the case, would be secure enough.

As to ammo, she very likely might store a box of ammo (or a couple) with the gun. Heck, she might even store a couple loaded magazines in the case. It depends on how much she feels she has to secure it from her kid, which is dependent on how much she trusts him, etc.

Just don't believe that she'd be required to have a gun safe and lock the gun up every night, and lock up all the ammo too. That type of legal requirement is pretty rare in the U.S.

frimble3
08-14-2012, 10:03 AM
Hi. The phrasing is so awkward, but the point is: I have a teenage character whose mother is a police officer. She's very, very busy, almost never at home. The teen needs to get her gun--and keep it. For several days at least.

So, if he just stole it and hid it somewhere, it wouldn't work, right? Like, she wakes up, her gun is gone, she knows it was there yesterday--there ought to be loads of noise and she'll immediately know someone in her family took it.
But... but but. Maybe? If, say, he stole it and hid it outside of their house without anyone knowing. How soon would the dust settle when the gun isn't found? She'd have lots of trouble because of "losing" it, right?

Another version of mine was that she has some sort of trophy gun, keeps it in the safe, and her son happened to watch her when she was locking it, so he knows the code. But there wouldn't be any bullets kept next to it, right? Hahaha. Kept near it? The world is full of stories of people shot by guns that weren't supposed to be loaded. Which is not a problem.

Basically what I'd love to know is how the police officers are supposed to keep/guard their weapons when at home.
Another vote for a second gun. Like they say, a gift or an inheritance, something she doesn't think of as a 'gun' but as a 'souvenir'. Maybe a family gun? Did the boy's father have one? Something she stuck away years ago, but mentioned in passing "Someday I'll show you the gun Grandpa used to use when he was a policeman."
She forgets all about it, but, because of the bit of family story, the boy remembers. Because Mom's gone so much, he has lots of time to search.
And, because it's a different make and caliber from her 'work' guns, she shoved its ammunition into the box (with the cheapo lock) with it. For convenience's sake, if she decided to sell it, or try it out for old time's sake, or whatever you think when you store old stuff of sentimental value.

WeaselFire
08-14-2012, 04:51 PM
Officers' weapons get stolen. They leave them in the car and the car gets broken into. They leave them at home and the house gets broken into. The officer will know, but there may or may not be a reason to suspect the son.

Is it important that it's the officer's duty weapon? If so, write a break in with cash, jewelry and guns missing.

Jeff

jaksen
08-14-2012, 07:27 PM
I bet she'd notice. :) It's like, is it possible for him to steal it and be able to walk around freely for a few days (about a week) later--or he'd be drugged into a police station and questioned non-stop because he'd be the prime suspect?

She doesn't even have to be a police officer, actually. She isn't important for the plot at all, she is absent most of the time. It's just that simply having a gun at home for no reason would be seen as awfully convenient, wouldn't it?

I'm actually familiar with firearms and their storage, but not the handguns. But logging around a rifle is yuck plot-wise, I need a pretty small weapon.

It seems I'll have to go with gun-at-home-for-no-reason, though...


First off, I have no guns in my house. My dad was a hunter and served in WWII. He 'brought home' several guns from the war, hid them all in the attic, unloaded. (We recently found some of them cleaning out the house.)

But almost every single one of the close relatives I can think of have guns in their houses. Pistols, rifles, shotguns. They are hunters, or would-be hunters or just want a gun. These people are at all levels of education; some work in factories and a couple are at the executive level and make six figures a year.

We are all New Englanders, though, from a rural background. Guns just were everywhere when I was a kid. I'd visit my grandfather's house (next door) and there they were. Being cleaned or taken apart or whatever the heck he was doing. He was a fairly well-to-do small business owner.

It's just like jackknifes. What boy or man in my region didn't carry a knife, or one in his boot, or pocket and many of the women, too. At a party thrown for me in 1976 (year I got married), I casually asked for scissors to cut the bows on some of the gifts I was opening and at least six-seven women leaned forward with a pen knife or jackknife in their hand. Little old, sedate women - oh, and a few younger ones, too. One cousin removed hers from her boot. (She was okay, just a tough girl.)

So in some cultures, guns are sort of...ubiquitous.

Oh, and no one in my family has ever hurt anyone on purpose or accidentally with their guns. So having one for 'protection' - my grandmother kept a little derringer in her nightstand - is not all that 'odd' - and I live in liberal Massachusetts.

veinglory
08-14-2012, 07:50 PM
If it's a major US city and he has $100 bucks he can get a gun by asking around.

Wicked
08-15-2012, 12:02 AM
It's just that simply having a gun at home for no reason would be seen as awfully convenient, wouldn't it?


Define, "for no reason".

My mother had a Glock, a rifle, and a shotgun. Most of the people I know have more than one gun.

A gun safe might solve your problem. The kid could get the combination somehow. I don't believe people tend to compulsively check on their valuables if they think they are locked up and secure.
Perhaps they have inherited a gun/guns from deceased relatives?

Firearms tend to pass down from generation to generation. Maybe the grandfather was a police officer, and his revolver is mothballed in some little safe no one ever thinks about?

Bullets without guns aren't much worry. They could be in the nightstand drawer, or the back of the laundry room cabinet.
On the other hand, my friend has a fancy gun safe, and the bullets are in a drawer in the bottom, right below the antique rifles and colt action revolvers.

Melina
08-16-2012, 11:52 PM
I was thinking of this a bit more. Let me ask a few questions.

Once again, I am assuming this is in the U.S.

How long has the mom been a cop? Is this the only department she worked at?

Does anyone else live in the house? Dad, other siblings, etc?

How old is the kid who takes the gun? Up until now has he been a "good kid" or a kid who gets into trouble? Basically, how trustworthy has he been up to now?

All this effects the scenario.

Assuming you don't want her to be "into guns" outside of having her have them as part of her job I can still think of some easy reasons she'd have a second pistol.

If she's been a cop for at least a few years her department may have upgraded their handguns in that time. Departments do buy new pistols from time to time for various reasons. Sometimes it's to change to a larger (or smaller) caliber, or to switch from revolvers to semi-autos (mostly done back in the 80's and 90's) or just because the old guns have been in service for 10 years or so and are starting to get worn out (from use in training, etc).

Many departments will give officers a chance to buy their old service pistol when the department upgrades to a new pistol. The officers pay the department directly (some do buy them and some don't). For the officers who don't buy their pistol the department sells the old guns to the firearms distributer in exchange for a discount on the new guns. The old guns are then resold in normal commercial firearms sales channels.

Heck, not all departments issue weapons themselves. In many departments the officer must purchase their own pistol from a list of "approved weapons" and is also responsible for buying extra magazines, holster and belt, etc. The list of approved weapons might be as short as "one" (You must purchase a Glock 22 .40 and a minimum of three mags, for example) to a list of typically no more than five or six approved choices.

For departments that require officers to buy their own and pick from a list of "approved pistols" that list may change over time. In some cases new pistols may be added that offer "better" features (more ammo capacity, larger caliber, etc) and in other cases older pistol types may be removed from the list due to known problems with the guns (history of malfunctions) or because the department has decided to standardize on a new caliber or specific brand of gun, etc. (Old list might have allowed 9mm, but change was made to only allow .40 S&W, etc).

Sometimes officers who purchased guns on the old approved list are allowed to keep using them even after the list is changed under a "grandfather clause." Other times the department may not allow that, or any, exception for whatever reason.

So, let's say her department required her to buy her own pistol. She did and used it for a few years. They then decided to make a change from 9mm to .40 S&W and required all the officers to buy the new guns within a certain time frame (say 6 months).

Many of the officers would offset the cost of buying a new pistol by selling the old pistol. But, not all officers will sell their old gun. Some may just want it, some may decide to sell it later when the local market is not as saturated with that particular type of pistol (because of all the cops selling theirs) and some may just not want the hassle of selling it and stick it in the gun safe or the back of the closet.

So, just have her still have her old gun. Make it the 9mm version of her current pistol (which is likely a .40 S&W) and have her not have sold it for whatever reason. (Maybe she liked it better, or wanted to use it for practice since the ammo is cheaper or just didn't want the hassle, whatever)

That brings me to storage. If her kid has always been trustworthy, and there is no one else to worry about (younger sister, etc) she may just have stuck it in it's orginal box and put it on a shelf in the closet. If she wanted to secure it she could slip a little luggage padlock through a hole in the box handle that is there for that purpose or used a larger padlock to hold the handle closes. It's an easy and cheap way to secure the pistol without buying a little gun safe.

Unfortunately, those little luggage padlocks are pretty easy to open and even easier to cut off. Even a "real" padlock can be defeated if you are determined. (Google "lock bumping") And, it might be as simple as the son knowing where she keeps the key! (Don't laugh, that's all too likely).

Just trying to give you a scenario where a cop who's not "into guns" might have a second pistol that she won't notice is missing for quite awhile, unless and until she has a reason to check.

There's still also the possiblity that she bought it because she wanted it, or it was a gift or inheritance, etc.

This.

My former department gave us a choice. We could go with a department-issued weapon, or buy our own from a list of approved weapons.

I, personally, chose to leave my weapon in the gun locker at the department, because I have a son who has ADHD. He would never mean to hurt anyone, but he has no voice in his head that says, "Bad idea. Don't do it." Instead, he does things, and then feels horrible about it. I just couldn't take the risk of keeping it at home.

That said, my dad is also a retired cop. When I was growing up, he had several pistols which he kept at home, just because he liked guns. Granted, there weren't stringent laws about storing weapons in those days, but they were never locked up. My sister and I knew better than to ever touch them, though, because he taught us from a very young age how dangerous firearms were.

The point I'm making is, lots of cops have weapons at home, other than their service weapons. There doesn't have to be any reason, other than that they like guns.

There are some of us, though, who have very good reasons for not keeping weapons at home.

WildScribe
08-17-2012, 12:08 AM
I grew up with a cop father, and he has a number of guns. A service weapon would be noticed immediately, and it's a big deal to lose one. On the other hand, he had several pistols for target shooting or just because he liked/wanted them, and those he might not really see between monthly cleanings unless he was going to go target shoot.

I am a stay at home mom and pro writer and editor with a trade skilled husband, and we own a glock, which is kept in a lock box that would probably be pathetically easy to break into, along with the ammo. (The point of the lock box isn't to deter thieves, it's just to keep a 4 year old out of it.)

Lots of people own guns, and depending on the state, a surprising number and demographic may CARRY guns.

Esther_Jones
08-17-2012, 12:47 AM
I agree with Melina & Wild Scribe. My dad is a retired cop, and growing up he had several guns locked away in a dresser. His service weapon he didn't bring home, but he had an older service revolver that he'd bought from the department when they stopped using them along with a few more.

It is possible to have the kid get the key to something like that and have the parent not notice if they're gone all the time, I think. Not something I would have tried with my dad, since he would have nailed me to the wall for even thinking about messing with his guns without his permission, but possible.

One thing I'll say though, is most cops I've met are really strict with their kids (plus on the alert for squirrelly behavior) just because of all the stuff they deal with on the job. If the mom doesn't have to be a cop for your story to work, I'd just make her a gun enthusiast or have her inherit Grandpa's gun or something like that.

WildScribe
08-17-2012, 12:53 AM
One thing I'll say though, is most cops I've met are really strict with their kids (plus on the alert for squirrelly behavior) just because of all the stuff they deal with on the job.

This is true, big time. My dad was extremely strict, although I got good at deceiving him, too. Also, I was raised to respect guns because we were around them, so I would never, never, NEVER have even thought to take one.

If you just need a reason to have a gun, say a neighbor had a breakin or a series of breakins years ago and the mom got scared and bought a gun for protection.

Cyia
08-17-2012, 01:03 AM
I bet she'd notice. :) It's like, is it possible for him to steal it and be able to walk around freely for a few days (about a week) later--or he'd be drugged into a police station and questioned non-stop because he'd be the prime suspect?

1 - he wouldn't automatically be the prime suspect

2 - no cop is going to "drag" another cop's kid in for questioning. They'd talk to the kid at the mom's house.


She doesn't even have to be a police officer, actually. She isn't important for the plot at all, she is absent most of the time.

Fine, then try ex-military. She's put her gun with her uniform in a foot locker in the closet and never looks at it.


It's just that simply having a gun at home for no reason would be seen as awfully convenient, wouldn't it?

Not if the kid lives in the South.

jmare
08-17-2012, 03:00 AM
Hi. The phrasing is so awkward, but the point is: I have a teenage character whose mother is a police officer. She's very, very busy, almost never at home. The teen needs to get her gun--and keep it. For several days at least.

So, if he just stole it and hid it somewhere, it wouldn't work, right? Like, she wakes up, her gun is gone, she knows it was there yesterday--there ought to be loads of noise and she'll immediately know someone in her family took it.
But... but but. Maybe? If, say, he stole it and hid it outside of their house without anyone knowing. How soon would the dust settle when the gun isn't found? She'd have lots of trouble because of "losing" it, right?

Another version of mine was that she has some sort of trophy gun, keeps it in the safe, and her son happened to watch her when she was locking it, so he knows the code. But there wouldn't be any bullets kept next to it, right? Which is a problem.

Basically what I'd love to know is how the police officers are supposed to keep/guard their weapons when at home.

Like others have said, if the mother is a police officer, her duty weapon going missing would be noticed immediately. So just make it another weapon, one that she wouldn't keep such tight control over.

As for the safe, not everyone keeps their weapons in a safe. I don't. My rifles are kept unloaded on the shelf in my closet and my handgun is next to my bed. But I also taught my kids to respect the guns and to never touch them unless I am with them. So don't think you need to have the weapons in a safe and must contrive a way for the son to gain access to the weapon.

AbielleRose
08-17-2012, 03:24 AM
Hi. The phrasing is so awkward, but the point is: I have a teenage character whose mother is a police officer. She's very, very busy, almost never at home. The teen needs to get her gun--and keep it. For several days at least.

So, if he just stole it and hid it somewhere, it wouldn't work, right? Like, she wakes up, her gun is gone, she knows it was there yesterday--there ought to be loads of noise and she'll immediately know someone in her family took it.
But... but but. Maybe? If, say, he stole it and hid it outside of their house without anyone knowing. How soon would the dust settle when the gun isn't found? She'd have lots of trouble because of "losing" it, right?

Another version of mine was that she has some sort of trophy gun, keeps it in the safe, and her son happened to watch her when she was locking it, so he knows the code. But there wouldn't be any bullets kept next to it, right? Which is a problem.

Basically what I'd love to know is how the police officers are supposed to keep/guard their weapons when at home.

I was a crafty kid who was always getting into locked places just because I knew how (kid + breaking into things = sense of power in my case :) ). My mom had a metal file cabinent that could be easily stretched so that the lock could STAY locked if you jiggled the drawer sidewase to pop it open.

Is it possible to have a reason for the mom to be somewhat 'absent' for a little while- like at a training conference or relatives in town (aka, off duty)- something that would have the job (and the job equipment) not at the forefront of her brain?

Trebor1415
08-17-2012, 07:55 AM
Lots of people own guns, and depending on the state, a surprising number and demographic may CARRY guns.

More true than you know. I'm one of them. I carry pretty much every time I leave the house, unless I know I'm specifically going to one of the places in my state where carry is illegal. And no, I'm not a cop.

I am a firearms instructor though. I mainly teach the class required for residents in my state to get a license to carry a pistol. You'd be amazed at the cross section of people I get in my classes. Guns, and carrying a gun, aren't just for "old white guys" anymore. I get plenty of women in my classes and people of all races. I get Husbands & Wives, women and their best friends, Fathers & sons, and whole families.

John342
08-17-2012, 02:43 PM
Another policeman voting...

Most officers have an "off-duty" gun. That is a gun they carry off-duty that is smaller, lighter and more easily concealable than their service weapon. There is a wide dispairity of opinion among police officers on the subject of carrying a weapon off duty... I'm pretty sure the day after that guy killed all those people in the theater in Colorado a lot of policemen that hadn't carried the day before were...

I married a fellow police officer and she left her gun at the station when her children were younger. She did keep a snub nosed revolver in her underwear drawer when I started dating her... but by then her children were grown.

JamesOliv
08-18-2012, 11:46 PM
It's funny you should bring up this topic....

I had an acquaintance whose mother was a Philadelphia Police Officer.

In high school, he took her off-duty weapon and toted it for a few days before she noticed it was missing.

Then he got in a lot of trouble.

But I'm a Navy veteran and, prior to moving to New York (crazy tough gun laws here), I had a concealed carry permit and two firearms in the house. You don't typically check up on it every day. If one had gone missing, I likely wouldn't have noticed it until the following weekend. My point is that plenty of people have guns around the house as well.

I used to have a monthly disgruntled veteran gun cleaning circle.

WeaselFire
08-19-2012, 12:09 AM
She did keep a snub nosed revolver in her underwear drawer when I started dating her...
"When" or "Because?" :)

Try living in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Florida... A handgun in the home is common, almost expected. In many jurisdictions, police weapons are carried at all times, even off duty. In most, off-duty carry is allowed.

The officers locally don't normally leave weapons at the station, but almost always have them secured at home. That includes second weapons, backups, etc. Officers are usually extremely aware of gun safety.

But the proposed plot is believable. And could be justified.

Jeff

John342
08-19-2012, 09:20 AM
"When" or "Because?" :)

Jeff

LOL I don't know, I never asked her. I only found out because once, when I was spending the night, we heard a very odd noise that woke us up. My gun had been left on the refrigerator in the kitchen and from the sound I figured I may need a gun before I reached the kitchen, so I asked, "You have a gun up here?"

That's when she got out of bed and retrieved the gun.

ironmikezero
08-19-2012, 10:44 PM
FWIW, To the best of my knowledge, I never held a position in law enforcement that didn't authorize, recommend, or compel off duty carry.

For example... My first job in LE (a long time ago) was as a police officer with the Metropolitan Police Dept. (Wash., DC). We were required to carry at all times. The rationale was that we were on duty at all times and only temporarily relieved of the routine performance of that duty. Failure to carry (concealed if "off duty") coupled with a failure to react to a crime committed in one's presence constituted a statutory misdemeanor and a violation of General Orders (departmental policy).

I later worked for agencies that didn't demand off duty carry, but I knew of few cops that eschewed being armed most of the time. You learn early on that it's the situation that you didn't anticipate or plan for that tends to happen - a karmic correlation of Murphy's Law.

NikkiSloan
08-26-2012, 06:58 PM
Another policeman voting...

...

I married a fellow police officer and she left her gun at the station when her children were younger. She did keep a snub nosed revolver in her underwear drawer when I started dating her... but by then her children were grown.


I love that you were aware of the revolver in her underwear drawer when you started dating her.

Windcutter
09-10-2012, 07:58 PM
Thank you! I'm saving the whole thread, it will be useful for other stories, too. :)

skylark
09-12-2012, 10:56 AM
There's also the possibility that she bought it for the kid (to learn how to shoot) a few years back. He wasn't interested / lost interest, but she never got round to getting rid of it...

She's not going to check on that unless it normally lives right next to where she keeps her own gun, and from what people are saying there's no reason it would have to.

Windcutter
09-12-2012, 07:17 PM
I really like the bought it for the kid idea, thank you. :)