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RemusShepherd
08-03-2012, 06:07 PM
A simple question that's surprisingly difficult to answer -- what is it like to live with hip-length hair? How long does it take to comb? How often do you need to comb it? How long did it take to grow? Do strands fall out? (An eyelash in the sink is noticable; I can't imagine missing a three-foot-long strand of hair.) Do you keep it under control with ties, braids, or hats?

The character in question is female and polynesian, but I'm interested in anyone's tales about living with very long hair. Thanks.

Mr Flibble
08-03-2012, 06:14 PM
My son has hip-length hair



How long does it take to comb? Deoends on how thick your hair is I guess - my son's is VERY thick. Combing...well we don't usually. It woudl take a week. Takes 10-15 mins to brush in the morning, and a few minutes each time during the day. After a brush with windy weather....as long as it takes.


How often do you need to comb it?

Again, will depend on hair, coarseness etc. Son brushes his three times a day + (or it gets unmanageably knotty)

How long did it take to grow?

I think it was about 4 years.

Do strands fall out? (An eyelash in the sink is noticable; I can't imagine missing a three-foot-long strand of hair.)
Well, yes. Hair still goes in growth cycles, no matter how long it is. Clogs up the Hoover I know that!


Do you keep it under control with ties, braids, or hats?

He wears it in a Sikh style bun/scarf arrangement for school, other than that it's left free.

Tbh, the thing that makes it more trouble than my daughter's shoulder length hair is the thickness of it, not the length. And the fact some days he has a job getting a brush through it!

KatieJ
08-03-2012, 06:29 PM
My hair is not as long now (mid-back) but I used t have hair that long, as did my three daughters. Theirs was never cut, my oldest daughters was long enough at the age of 2 1/2 that I needed to include "pull your hair over your shoulder" as one of the steps of potty-training.

what is it like to live with hip-length hair? It's heavy and hot if you leave it down. It's very hard to wash - you find yourself washing it once or twice a week because it takes so long. If you put it up after you wash it, it is still wet hours later. If you comb or brush it wet, you pull more hairs out than if you let it dry first.

How long does it take to comb? I've never timed it, but maybe ten minutes? It feels very good to comb/brush it (or even to run your fingers through it)

How often do you need to comb it? AT LEAST daily, twice a day is better.

How long did it take to grow? Everyone is different, I grew mine from about aged twelve - it was hip length by twenty. My daughters were all different, but all had hip length hair by twelve or thirteen I think.

Do strands fall out? (An eyelash in the sink is noticable; I can't imagine missing a three-foot-long strand of hair.) YES, YES, in the brush, in the comb, in the shower. My husband had to snake the drain all the time. We have a handful of those little plastic snakes under the sink for the girls to do it themselves - as if they would.

Do you keep it under control with ties, braids, or hats? Yes, braids are best - I think. Headbands slip off. I prefer combs, you can also use hairsticks and hairpins.

Every culture is different, so this wouldn't answer Polynesian hair questions. Hair gets drier the longer it gets, brushing distributes the scalp oils through the hair strand. It CAN get thinner as it gets longer, too, although we haven't seen much of that.

Hope this helps!

shadowwalker
08-03-2012, 06:48 PM
I never had my hair cut (except for split ends) until I graduated high school. My mother kept my hair in two braids, and it took a good 30 minutes every day before school (I hated sitting still that long!). Mine is thick and fine, so braiding was the only way to keep it anywhere near manageable, and even then the knots were horrid, especially after washing (which was a whole 'nother mess, considering we didn't have a shower when I was a kid - bent over the kitchen sink!). Once I got into high school, I quit wearing braids and went with pony tails or barettes, and combed it out, section by section, several times a day. And yes, it's hot and uncomfortable in the summer, no matter what you do.

Nowadays I can't stand my hair even long enough to touch my shoulders - off it goes! :tongue

crunchyblanket
08-03-2012, 06:53 PM
I used to have hair to just below my waist. My hair is very straight and moderately fine, so as long as I conditioned the ends regularly it was never any trouble to comb. I used to wear it in a low plait or a high ponytail - I rarely left it down as it would get tangled pretty quickly, particularly if it was windy out (pro tip: never wear lipgloss on a windy day if you've got long hair) I used to brush it a few times a day to get the knots out if I did leave it loose.

When strands did fall out, it was usually broken hair as opposed to the entire strand - say, the last third or so of the strand. My mum used to complain about drain-cloggage. I don't think long hair sheds any more often than short hair (mine's now boy-short) it's just that it gets snagged on things more easily, is pulled out through tangling, and looks more substantial when it gathers in the plughole.

Mutive
08-03-2012, 06:57 PM
A simple question that's surprisingly difficult to answer -- what is it like to live with hip-length hair? How long does it take to comb? How often do you need to comb it? How long did it take to grow? Do strands fall out? (An eyelash in the sink is noticable; I can't imagine missing a three-foot-long strand of hair.) Do you keep it under control with ties, braids, or hats?


1. It takes me about 5 minutes to brush through my hair. I do use a gigantic brush to help, though, as well as various hair oils that make it easier to manage. It's pretty much wash and wear.

2. I brush it maybe 2-3xs a day. (In the morning, before I sleep, before I wear it down, sometimes an additional time if I want to change its style.)

3. About 10 years. Although most of the length was there after maybe 3-4.

4. Strands are constantly coming out. Someone thought that a golden retriever used my car as they couldn't figure any other reason as to why it was matted in blonde fur. You can usually tell where I sit because there are piles of hair everywhere. If I leave it up, this isn't too bad. But I sometimes get handfuls of hair falling out if I sit with it down for a few minutes.

5. My hair is up about 90% of the time. It's close to unmanagable down. Sometimes I even sleep with it in braids. Usually I use braids or a bun. At the very least, I tend to tie it back from my face. Swimming is a nightmare (I only dunk my head under water if it's been braided up before hand. Otherwise, I'd never get it untangled). I almost never get my hair wet other than when washing it (and give it maybe 3 hours before bed to dry). It takes ~1 hour to blow dry (I have very thick hair in addition to long hair, so this would differ for someone with less hair.)

Strangely, it's pretty easy other than this. I can braid it back in <5 minutes and put it into a bun in about 10 seconds. When it was shorter, it actually took more work between the blow drying, gelling, mousing, etc. (But I did swim more often.)

benbenberi
08-03-2012, 07:43 PM
Here's a website all about extremely long hair (http://www.prismnet.com/~cortese/hair/index.html).

Maryn
08-03-2012, 08:03 PM
I have hair down to my butt for the third time. Our daughter's hair is longer. Our son's hair maybe eight inches shorter, nearing his waist.
A simple question that's surprisingly difficult to answer -- what is it like to live with hip-length hair?It's easier than living with shorter hair. All I have to do is keep it clean and brushed, trim it a couple times a year, and I'm done. No styling products, no bad hair days.
How long does it take to comb? I rarely comb, only brush to remove tangles. It rarely takes more than three minutes, often as little as one.
How often do you need to comb it?Once or twice a day will do it, unless I've been out in the wind or done something else which rearranges it.
How long did it take to grow? I think this time it was around six or seven years. I wasn't paying attention once it got past my shoulder blades.
Do strands fall out? (An eyelash in the sink is noticable; I can't imagine missing a three-foot-long strand of hair.)Of course they do. The rule at our house (and now, our kids' homes) is that you do not brush your hair over the sink. Long hairs are easy to sweep up, although they do tangle into certain weaves of carpet and sweaters. The worst issue with fallen hairs is that they wrap around the beater bar of vacuum cleaners, move to the ends, and prevent the bar from turning, burning out the motor. So you have to either cut the hair off the beater bar, or take apart the vacuum every room or two.
Do you keep it under control with ties, braids, or hats?I braid it overnight, because it was disturbing my sleep. Now the braid occasionally wraps my throat and I dream of hanging. I tie it back for cooking and put it up with barrettes or spring clips for baking involving kneading. I can work it through the opening of a cheap baseball cap for working out; it's cooler to have it up off my neck.


The character in question is female and polynesian, but I'm interested in anyone's tales about living with very long hair. Thanks.Things to add to make her experience realer:
Strangers compliment my hair occasionally, which is cool.
Strangers feel free to touch my hair occasionally. Not cool.
People undergoing chemo ask if they can have it. I never know what to say, but it's happened a half-dozen times or so.
People ask why I don't cut it off and donate it to Locks of Love. Uh, because I want to keep it? (And because they won't take hair with any white strands, which I've got plenty of.)
In stadiums and on subway trains, long loose hair gets in the way and is accidentally pulled by people just sitting in their own seats or holding onto the hand grips. I pull it in a ponytail for baseball games.
I often wash only the part near my head. The rest doesn't get all that dirty.
That said, I always seem to drag a few strands across the plate when we're having pancakes.
When your hair's thick, it's really hard to find barrettes and clips which will hold all of it. It's nearly impossible to put up without them. Mine's thinned a bit as I've gotten older, and it's easier now.
Split ends are the enemy, and the hair dryer is their ally. Even in winter, I never dry the ends with heat.
Depending on just what one is doing, long hair can cause problems with one's sexual partner, who accidentally tugs it when shifting positions or moving a supporting hand or elbow.

If long hair questions come up as you're writing, put me on your list of people you can ask.

Maryn, self-styled expert

Pinguicha
08-03-2012, 08:11 PM
A simple question that's surprisingly difficult to answer -- what is it like to live with hip-length hair? How long does it take to comb? How often do you need to comb it? How long did it take to grow? Do strands fall out? (An eyelash in the sink is noticable; I can't imagine missing a three-foot-long strand of hair.) Do you keep it under control with ties, braids, or hats?


Those all depend on the food you eat, the shampoo you use (I know, sounds dumb, but it's true) and of the type of hair.

I had hip-long hair for a long time. It took me around 1 1/2-2 years for it to grow that much. I was around 16 when I decided to let it grow out, and at 17/18, I already had a respectable hair length.

Now, because I have extremely straight hair, I only had to comb it once, twice a day (morning and after showering). It didn't really get all knotted and wild - I'm lucky in that aspect. I only ever tied it to eat (long hair is a pain in the ass when you're eating. If you're not careful, it gets in your food) and to play roller hockey. Curiously, at least once or twice in a match, if I skated past someone from the other team, they'd try to grab my hair to make me stop. This happened. A lot.

I also used pigtails whenever I wanted to look childishly cute and innocent.

Hats, if not carefully chosen, look awful with long hair, so I never used them. Except for beanies after practice, to keep me from catching a cold, and even those I took off immediately upon arriving home.

The loose strands were a mess - especially after showering. My brush would be FILLED with them. And when I combed my hair in the morning, the floor would always end up with a lot of them, too. My mother would yell at me to clean up after myself and tell me to cut my hair because of that.

The worst of it was (I doubt you'll need this info, but here it goes anyway) was that I somehow got lice while taking my driving lessons (we use the school's car, not our own). Granted, I have shitty blood for lice and by the time I noticed I had them they'd all died out, but because I had such long hair, I had to wash it at least four times and spend hours in the backyard while my parents check my head. It was awful and the absolute worst inconvenience of long hair.

And then, two years into college, I was in a relationship that ended badly and I chopped it all off. Short hair is low-maintenance in comparison, so I've kept it like that for a couple of years. I'm letting it grow back to hip-length now, though.

Also, in the beginning I said food, shampoo and type of hair matter because:

- good shampoo keeps your ends from breaking, hence, the hair grows better
- a balanced diet (especially one with loads of vegetables) makes your hair grow faster
- People with straight hair tend to get dandruff :P I can only use shampoos from either the pharmacy or the hairdresser. With supermarket shampoos, it's like it snowed in my hair and it's disgusting.

ladyleeona
08-03-2012, 08:12 PM
A simple question that's surprisingly difficult to answer -- what is it like to live with hip-length hair? How long does it take to comb? How often do you need to comb it? How long did it take to grow? Do strands fall out? (An eyelash in the sink is noticable; I can't imagine missing a three-foot-long strand of hair.) Do you keep it under control with ties, braids, or hats?

The character in question is female and polynesian, but I'm interested in anyone's tales about living with very long hair. Thanks.

It's...interesting. I actually just cut mine to a few inches above hip-length, and it's still a lot to deal with. I have really fine textured hair, so I really don't comb it much. I generally wear it in a braid or a bun, so combing or brushing is usually only in the morning right before I put it up. On the odd occasion when I wear it down, I brush it pretty much constantly. I use assorted products, including a leave-in conditioner, that keeps the tangles from developing into monsters. It took me about about 4 years to grow it out.

As far as strands falling out--I shed a ton. I finger-comb it in the shower whenever I have my conditioner in, and a bunch of hair falls out every time. (At which point I stick them to the shower wall--to be thrown away when I get out--because the alternative is them going down the drain.) My fiance LOVES it when I forget to throw the hairballs away.... My car always has hair in it, but at least it's usually contained to the driver's seat.

Keeping it under control is usually not too much of a problem (again, braids, rubberbands, etc.), but when it's loose I have closed it in doors before (car door, usually. house doors are extra fun--maximum yankage.) It does catch on things. And, because of the length, I've managed to wallop myself in the face before with the tail end of my braid while playing basketball. Ended up with a black eye and a really sad story.

Wicked
08-03-2012, 08:35 PM
Things to add to make her experience realer:

Depending on just what one is doing, long hair can cause problems with one's sexual partner, who accidentally tugs it when shifting positions or moving a supporting hand or elbow.



+10 Nothing can ruin a moment quite like, "Ow! You're on my hair!"

My hair is straight and waist length. I normally keep it in a ponytail, but if I'm doing something very active that would involve a lot of bending (which would cause my hair to constantly get in my face and eyes) I braid it, or clip it up out of the way.

Windy days are the same. Getting your own hair whipped into your eyes is a stinging and unpleasant sensation. The lip gloss problem someone stated earlier is also an issue. The hair sticks or gets drug through the gloss and all over your face.

Everyone has covered most of things I can think of.

Hair shedding and clogging vacuums and drains here, too. Sometimes I get a handful of hair when I use cream rinse. I'll wind it around my fingers to keep it together, then throw it away right away, so it doesn't go down the drain.

Mutive
08-03-2012, 08:49 PM
+10 Nothing can ruin a moment quite like, "Ow! You're on my hair!"



It also gets in your mouth when you try to kiss.

So tired of people thinking it's the sexiest thing ever to have my hair down in bed. It's not. Half back is okay, if your partner thinks long hair = super sexy. But not tied back at all? Ugh...

ArtsyAmy
08-03-2012, 09:55 PM
I'll try not to repeat what's already been said. Now my hair is half-way down my back, all one length, pretty thick. It's been longer. It's super, super easy! Just shampoo then condition while in the shower--apply extra conditioner to the ends, and let it sit 30 seconds or so about once a week before rinsing. I brush mine while it's still pretty wet--I don't have the breakage problem that some have when doing that, and it's easier to brush while wet. Brushing takes 5 minutes or so. Just divide it in half, pull around the left side and brush, pull around the right side and brush, put both sides back and brush the back. I just let it air-dry. Depending on humidity, it's usually dry in 30-40 minutes, I suppose. Blow drying would be a big hassle. One downer: can't wash it right before bed--no good falling asleep with wet hair. No styling products--that's good. I don't have the hairballs or shedding that others have written about. Once in a while I'll spot a hair that has fallen out, and my brush does fill up.

I'll add that I've found a big difference between half-way down my back hair and hair that is longer--even by a few inches. When longer, I've experienced it getting caught under the elbow of someone sitting next me--that kind of thing, and it does take longer to air-dry. Oh yes, when a person with loose, long hair bends down (say to pick up something on the floor), hair can spill to the floor--gotta watch for that. Also, if someone's getting sick, the hair has to be pulled back so it doesn't get vomit on it. (Sorry to be gross--it's true, though.)

Edit: When brushing, it's not roots to ends at first. Start seveal inches from the ends, brush that section out to the ends. Move up several inches, brush that through to the ends. Keep moving up, until eventually you are brushing roots to ends.

Jericho McKraven
08-03-2012, 10:05 PM
My girlfriend has hip length hair, she usually conditions it in the shower and runs a comb through it. Takes her all of two min. She has a very natural look though, I have no idea what it would be like if someone wanted to style it every day.

Also, when she tells me she is going to straighten it before going somewhere, I know I will have about an hour of free time on my hands because she'll be in the bathroom forever.

Maryn
08-03-2012, 10:07 PM
I forgot one: When you happen to be naked, the longest part can get stuck in nature's cleft, without your realizing it until you happen to nod.

Maryn, laughing because that's happened a fair number of times

RemusShepherd
08-03-2012, 10:21 PM
Thanks, folks! Some great info here. I'm going to make good use of it.

ULTRAGOTHA
08-03-2012, 10:27 PM
A simple question that's surprisingly difficult to answer -- what is it like to live with hip-length hair? How long does it take to comb?

I don't use a comb. It takes me maybe 5 minutes or less to brush it with a plastic brush like this one (http://www.goody.com/Products/Styling%20Tools/Finish%20Paddle%20Brush?colId=cd08de84-95c8-43ae-bc4f-4602c4d08362&c_id=35a36c88-d359-4104-a53c-dfbfd8452780).



How often do you need to comb it?

I brush it once a day if I put it into a braid. If I leave it loose I usually touch it up a few times throughout the day. A brush lives in my drawer at work.



How long did it take to grow?

I cut it to shoulder length with bangs (fringe) in 1987 and it probably took ... three years? to grow this long. I haven't cut it since, except for occational trims to even it out. I think the last trim was three years ago. It's now as long as It's going to get.



Do strands fall out? (An eyelash in the sink is noticable; I can't imagine missing a three-foot-long strand of hair.)

All the time. But usually in the brush. Some get caught in waist bands when I have it loose. It gets into the back of my (fabric covered) chair, too. I have to keep the vacuume roller cleaned as it does tend to get on the floors at home.


Do you keep it under control with ties, braids, or hats?

Usually a single braid down the back.

When very hot, I'll do it in two braids--one on each side--and then use a hair elastic (http://www.amazon.com/Ponytail-Holder-Rubber-Assorted-Colors/dp/B004RDSISC) to tie the ends together. This keeps it off the back of my neck and behind me so it doesn't get in my way.

Sometimes I'll tie it into a knot at the nape of my neck (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?p=625835). (See first photo in that thread. Photo is not of me. That community might help you with your questions. I found it when Googling for a photo of a hair knot.)

When I do a hair knot like that, I have to use a hair stick to hold it in place (with a string tied to the hair stick that figure-eights around each end of the stick and is cinched in place with a half-hitch. A manover anyone who does boats will be familiar with--bowlines go around cleats exactly the same way.)


I don't know about others but I cannot wash my hair everyday or the ends turn into straw. Even using Mane 'n Tail (http://manentail.com/products/original-mane-n-tail-conditioner/) (cannot recommend that stuff enough!). At most, I wash it three times a week.


ETA: Drying! I also condition in the shower with Mane 'n Tail and then brush. I then usually braid my hair while wet to let the Mane 'n Tail soak in. It will take over 12 hours to dry when I do that. Or longer, especially if it's humid (hello Samoa!). I have to unbraid the next morning, re-brush and leave it loose for it to dry thoroughly. Also, if you have feather pillows, you've got to use a lot of towels if you wash your hair at night or you get moldy feathers after a while. I run mine through the dryer on occation to get them very dry because I really hate morning showers.

EMaree
08-03-2012, 10:29 PM
I only have shoulder-length hair (very thick, falls out often enough that I find strands of it everywhere... bit of a nightmare when cooking) but I feel like I've learnt quite a bit about hair maintenance from this thread.

Siri Kirpal
08-03-2012, 11:23 PM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

You've probably got plenty, but since I'm a Sikh :)...

5 minutes to comb, twice daily. Goes up in a "rishi knot." I wind it up in a knot on the back center of my head (a Sikh man puts it up in the front center), use 2 hair pins, place a white cotton men's handkerchief (women's have too much frilly stuff) on top and use a ponytail holder to hold it. Turban goes on over that. Turbaning process takes 5-10 minutes. Not much of a problem during the day. Turban comes off and hair comes down at night.

Wash hair 2x a week. Don't put it up until it's dry. Don't eat (well, not usually) while it's down. Have to be careful using the bathroom at night.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Mr Flibble
08-04-2012, 12:20 AM
Drying! I also condition in the shower with Mane 'n Tail and then brush.

Mane and tail shampoo etc is awesome. Can't get it over here though :(

Pinguicha
08-04-2012, 12:43 AM
I only have shoulder-length hair (very thick, falls out often enough that I find strands of it everywhere... bit of a nightmare when cooking)

SO TRUE. When I came to college and started living alone, I had to start using ponytails while cooking because my hair would fall and, because I have such bad luck, it would inevitably fall onto the pan. Eugh.

Of course, now I have a Persian cat. It makes all my former long-hair-falling problems seem silly. There's cat fur everywhere in my house -- more often than not, on my toast and on my dark shirts.

backslashbaby
08-04-2012, 02:30 AM
Mine is very long now, but not to my hips -- almost to my waist. I wear it in a braid or a long bun-thing daily unless I'm dressing up.

Mine sheds a bunch, but only when I brush it or wash it (every other day or so). I have tons of hair, as in numbers of hairs on my head, so it's thick because of that. When I dress up, I make sure to pull on the bottom of my hair all around to get any that may want to come loose. No stray hairs out at dinner, no.

The brush looks ridiculous after I've washed it. So much hair, lol!

Mine is curly textured, so if I don't put it up overnight, I wake up with dreads starting. I could have waist-length dreads in about 3 days, probably, if I wanted to go there :D Too tangly for my taste, since you have to cut them out!

I use a ton of conditioner; there's never enough at hotels, for instance :D I use about two (3?) of those bottles each time I shampoo.

Unimportant
08-04-2012, 03:07 AM
Agree with what everyone says about taking forever to dry, going through heaps of conditioner (Mane&Tail was awesome stuff!), tying it in a knot to get it out of the way when you're working and don't have a hair-tie or rubber band handy, and leaving great wodges of hairballs trailing behind you everywhere you shed. Also, I'm one of those people who twists and turns constantly in my sleep, and when I had really long hair it would sometimes get tangled around my throat and choke me. I learned to tie or braid it back at night to prevent that.

shaldna
08-04-2012, 11:37 AM
A simple question that's surprisingly difficult to answer -- what is it like to live with hip-length hair?


My daughter has hip length hair - never been cut. ever.


How long does it take to comb?

Not long for her - her hair is pretty fine, although there is plenty of it. We use a lot of spray in conditioner to prevent tangles, and she only gets her hair washed once a week, so it's easy enough to deal with in that sense.


How often do you need to comb it?

At least twice a day, every day, sometimes more depending.

As an aside - spray in conditioner or detangler with a warm comb is much easier than just trying to brush it out. When it's really badly tatted separating it out with your fingers works best. You can get detangling combs which move with the hair, although I find that brushing it while damn with a wide tooth shower comb deals with most of the hassle. Also, a paddle brush is your friend.

As always though, you need to start at the bottom of the hair and work your way up - never start at the crown and just brush down - that's an act of war.



How long did it take to grow?

My daughter is 5 1/2 and has never had her hair cut, although on of my friends is nearly 20 and has waist lentgh hair that she grew out in about two years, so it depends. Hair grows about an inch a month.



Do strands fall out? (An eyelash in the sink is noticable; I can't imagine missing a three-foot-long strand of hair.)

Yes, sometimes it's like she's casting.

It's not a lot though, hairs in the brush etc, the same as everyone else.



Do you keep it under control with ties, braids, or hats?

When she leaves the house it is. But her hair seems to have Medusa tendancies and within 10 minutes of me carefully tying and pinning it into place it's flying around her face like a feral lion.

shaldna
08-04-2012, 11:50 AM
In stadiums and on subway trains, long loose hair gets in the way and is accidentally pulled by people just sitting in their own seats or holding onto the hand grips. I pull it in a ponytail for baseball games.

Oh god, this too.

My hair isn't terribly long (just above bra strap) but I wear it up mostly in pins or sticks, frequently my daughter with her feral hair will get tangled up with me when she hugs me. Cue hilarious moment of trying to untangle and separate.


Split ends are the enemy, and the hair dryer is their ally. Even in winter, I never dry the ends with heat.

I have a friend who has NEVER blow dried her hair. Never straightened it. Never coloured it. And it's the most amazing hair you've ever seen. I'm seriously jealous every time i see it.



Mane and tail shampoo etc is awesome. Can't get it over here though :(

For a second I thought you were talking about the Horse shampoo we have here.

That said, for REALLY bad times with thick, and especially wiry hair, you should check out 'Canter Mane and Tail' - it is a spray on detangler for horses, but I know several folk who swear by it for their own hair, and hey, if it works...

Holly Green
08-04-2012, 03:31 PM
I hardly ever wear my hair up because it gives me headaches. I'm also prone to cold ears, so find it useful to have a built-in scarf.

Long hair needs restraining though for activities such as leaning over elements, and brushing ones teeth. Those retracting seatbelts are a serious hazard too. Ouch. Have lost a fair number of strands to those, despite the fact that I don't drive. As for toddlers...good grief...I give them a wide berth...

I adore bugs, but when I hear a frantic buzzing noise in the vicinity of my ear, I get a bit panicky.

One of the really annoying things about having long hair is that everyone thinks it's hilarious to call you Rapunzel.

scarletpeaches
08-04-2012, 07:09 PM
He wears it in a Sikh style bun/scarf arrangement for ...Because he's cooler than everyone else. :D

No dagger, though.

sunandshadow
08-04-2012, 07:56 PM
I have hip-length hair. Took 3 years for the majority of it (waist-length) then about another year for the last few inches. It falls out regularly - least if I have it tied up, most when I'm in the shower. My housemate complains that he finds strands of my hair wound through his laundry, and they do get wound around the vacuum cleaner brush. Other than that I don't notice the shed hair much; I don't usually notice it in the car or on the floor. If it's winter and there's a lot of static electricity my hair will stick to some fabrics rather dramatically, with a crackle noise when I pull them apart. Similarly it will stick to sweaty skin in a rather nasty way, I try to avoid having it loose when it's sweaty. It does occasionally get caught on things, like doorknobs or pinned between my desk chair and desk edge because the chair rotated as I was getting up.

My hair is low maintenance - wash with shampoo every other day, brush about twice a day for maybe 3 minutes, unless I have it in a knot on top of my head the whole time because it doesn't need brushed that way. No other care or products. I use a good old-fashioned bristle brush, those pick brushes that have become more popular over the last few years are painful. To tie it up I use two scrunchies - one to ponytail it tight against my head, then I wind the hair around itself into a bun, then I use the second scrunchy around the base of the bun to hold it in place. If I don't want to put it up like that but I need to do some messy work or ride in a car with the windows open or top down, I just pull it back in a ponytail, if necessary adding a second scrunchy halfway down. When I wear my hair down I generally wear a hair band to keep it back out of my face and out of my food when I eat.

WriteMinded
08-04-2012, 08:08 PM
I found it very easy to live with hip-length hair. Wash, brush, light dryer (30 seconds). Done. If I'd inherited the beautiful Native American hair of my grandmother - much like Polynesian - it would have been even easier.

Yes, of course you lose strands. A hair has a life span. It dies, falls out, and a new one starts growing - hopefully. :) Hair grows half-an-inch per month - approximately. How often you need to comb it depends a lot on the weather and how neat you want to keep it. Using a brush with the widely spaced plastic bristles is best. IMHO. As for keeping it under control, if you're a woman, it depends on your mood. Sometimes you feel like a braid, sometimes you don't. If you're a man, you might have more practical reasons for tying it up some way. It can get in the way when you are fighting or even be used against you.

Yes, it gets in the sink. So does short hair. You wipe it out the same way. I've never been offended by the sight of my own hair.

Anything else you want to know about hair?

ULTRAGOTHA
08-04-2012, 09:43 PM
Mane and tail shampoo etc is awesome. Can't get it over here though :(


Amazon US is your friend (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_sq_top?ie=UTF8&keywords=mane%20and%20tail&index=blended&pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B000QFRBNS&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=04B4JYZWH01M3SSTTBTP).

Or, assuming you are in Britain, I might be willing to trade for some Colman's sachets (http://www.amazon.com/Colmans-Shepherds-1-75-Ounce-Packages-Pack/dp/B000HQR9UQ/ref=sr_1_11?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1344101938&sr=1-11) and Malteasers. ;)


Back to the topic: for some reason people tend to think of long hair as religious. Especially when I'm in company of other women with long hair I get asked if it's a religious thing.

Er, no, I do medieval reenactment. But mostly I'm cheap and lazy. I haven't been to a hair dresser since 1987.

blacbird
08-05-2012, 06:08 AM
I tried growing my hair long, back after leaving the Army in 1971. Problem turned out to be that my hair wanted to be as wide as it was long. I developed a really good Nordic Afro, out to the shoulders.

Then I got smart and recognized how ridiculous that looked. Now I compensate with a beard.

caw

Polenth
08-05-2012, 06:39 AM
Hair texture matters for this too. My hair is curly and is relatively fragile (fine strands, which dry towards the ends and become brittle). Though I don't cut it, it's only about half way down my back. I wouldn't be able to get it longer without dreadlocking it. So you need to give your character a hair texture that can be grown that long.

blackrose602
08-05-2012, 04:50 PM
My mom had hair long enough to sit on. Mine's to my lower back. Both extremely thick--before Mom grew hers out, when it was only shoulder-length, she liked to go for perms. It always took two perm kits, two stylists and about four hours, just because of the thickness.

Brushing is an all the time thing--some people sit in front of the TV and knit or work a puzzle. Mom would sit and brush her hair for hours. I only brush four or five times a day, and mine has an annoying kinky curl to the underlayer, so I regularly end up with tight tangles that hurt to get out.

Washing--I grew up in Central Florida. With the humidity, if we washed every day, our hair would literally never be dry (can't use a blow dryer, it makes me look like the Bride of Frankenstein!!). I don't wash in the shower at all anymore. I've found some no-rinse shampoo and conditioner that work very well without soaking my hair. It only takes 2-3 hours to dry this way.

Shedding--Oh yeah. Dad's hair's pretty thick too and just past shoulder-length. Between the three of us, we managed to burn out more vacuum cleaner motors before eventually learning how to clean out the hair that was wrapped around the brush.

Daily wear--Mom was great at braids, knots, buns, but usually left it down, often pulled back from her face with combs or barrettes. I like mine down, but I can pull it into a loose bun in under a minute if I need to.

Problems--Mom nearly got scalped when hers got wrapped up in an automatic retracting seat belt. I also occasionally caught her hair when I was sitting behind her in the car and rolled up my window! I get mine caught on everything--door handles, shopping carts, under other people's elbows...The worst was when we rented a convertible and drove from Florida to upstate New York. We both did everything we could think of--braids, baseball caps, barrettes, and our hair got hopelessly matted anyway. Took literally days to comb it out.

But I love my hair and I love the look. It's just something that you learn to adapt to.

WriteMinded
08-05-2012, 05:42 PM
Oh yeah. Once a chipmunk got into my (hip length) hair and wouldn't leave. Clingy little bastard.

Pinguicha
08-05-2012, 10:43 PM
Oh yeah. Once a chipmunk got into my (hip length) hair and wouldn't leave. Clingy little bastard.

LOL. The same happened to me with a pidgeon. It NESTED in my hair. Disgusting asshole.

Orianna2000
08-05-2012, 11:48 PM
One thing to remember is that the type of hair makes a big difference. Fine, straight hair is a different animal than thick, curly hair.

I have the latter, about waist-length. It needs to be washed twice a week, more than that dries it out. I have to use 2-in-1 shampoo/conditioner and only wash the roots. Some people with very curly hair actually wash with conditioner, not shampoo. Detangler is my best friend, as is a wide-toothed comb. Trying to brush my hair without either is painful. Once it's dry, you're not supposed to brush it, but that's specific to curly hair, I believe.

I have to braid it when it's hot or when I'm exercising, and when I sleep. It gets very heavy, especially because I have auburn hair, which is not only thicker than regular hair, but more numerous, as far as strands per inch. For putting it up, I find that old-fashioned hairpins work better than bobby pins. Jawclips and barrettes are worthless.

I have the same problems as everyone else with shedding and hair clogging the drain, or ruining the vacuum. Also, loose hairs tend to tickle the backs of my arms. I'm constantly running my hands over my arms to dislodge any loose hairs that might be tickling me. It's quite annoying.

Unimportant
08-06-2012, 03:23 AM
I did have a wasp get caught in my hair once, and it stung the f*ck out of my forehead (while I screeched and batted at it and tried to yank it out of my hair).

I'd sometimes braid my hair while it was still wet/damp (to get it out of the way) and when I unbraided it later it would be all crimped/wavy.

Niniva
08-06-2012, 03:43 AM
Goodness, there is more info here than I can read. I dated a girl -- it was college, that's what it's for -- that was half-Thai with long, thick (both the individual stands and the entire mass) hair similar to a Polynesians. Her hair would barely hold a curl, even if she braided it wet. It was far too heavy to lift itself like that.

[And, I'll mention the one most disgusting thing: the dingle berries. You swallow a hair, and it connects two pellets together...]

bulldoggerel
08-06-2012, 03:46 AM
I forgot one: When you happen to be naked, the longest part can get stuck in nature's cleft.

Quite often I meet up with a woman in my neighborhood with one long, grey, floor-length dreadlock. She is probably 65 years old and 5'2" tall. Everytime I see her I always think " Guess where the middle of that hank of hair sleeps every night? Ewwwwww. I'll never floss again.

Pinguicha
08-06-2012, 07:35 AM
I have the latter, about waist-length. It needs to be washed twice a week, more than that dries it out. I have to use 2-in-1 shampoo/conditioner and only wash the roots. Some people with very curly hair actually wash with conditioner, not shampoo. Detangler is my best friend, as is a wide-toothed comb. Trying to brush my hair without either is painful. Once it's dry, you're not supposed to brush it, but that's specific to curly hair, I believe.

Only wash with conditioner? This is brand new information for me. I've only known one or two people with really curly hair and all I knew about it was that they kept it short because it was easy to maintain curls that way (one of them had really well-defined, shampoo-commercial worthy curls).

Orianna2000
08-06-2012, 03:23 PM
Only wash with conditioner? This is brand new information for me. I've only known one or two people with really curly hair and all I knew about it was that they kept it short because it was easy to maintain curls that way (one of them had really well-defined, shampoo-commercial worthy curls).
This advice can be found in more than one book aimed at people with curly hair. My mom had a really hard time dealing with my adopted sister's African hair, until she read a book about how to embrace curly hair and deal with it as if it's actually totally different from straight hair. She started the routine of using conditioner instead of shampoo and it works quite well. It's the act of shampooing that gets rid of dirt and oil from the hair--the actual product used isn't as important as the act of massaging the roots and scalp and rinsing it all away.

You're never supposed to pile your hair on your head while shampooing, either. That will only lead to tangles and breakage. You let your hair hang straight the whole time and just work the conditioner/shampoo into the roots. One book even recommends using conditioner in place of styling products, after you're out of the shower. You work gobs of the stuff into your still-wet hair, until your hair won't absorb any more moisture. It leaves your hair surprisingly soft and easy to work with.

onesecondglance
08-06-2012, 04:11 PM
I have a long-haired cat. Much of the advice and experience related here is surprisingly familiar. :D

evilrooster
08-06-2012, 05:28 PM
A simple question that's surprisingly difficult to answer -- what is it like to live with hip-length hair?

I have hip-length hair: dense fine strands, substantially straight. What's different in my life than, say, my husband's, as a result:

I wash my hair 2-3 times a week. I wash it at night: shampoo focusing on the scalp, where the oils are, comb conditioner through the ends to make sure they get well-coated (a trick I learned during a family head lice infestation, when I realized nit combing the oil through my hair was making it extra-soft!). Then I go to bed with it wet, and it's usually dry by morning.

Bed head does not exist in my universe.

I brush it with a plastic-bristled paddle brush (hard spikes, relatively separated) every morning, and occasionally in the evening as well. My daughter, whose hair is mid-back but who isn't as tough an old cow as I am, uses a soft bristle brush followed by a stiff one.

If I've worn it in a long ponytail with a scrunchie all day, it's prone to extra knots at the nape of the neck.

I braid it when I cycle to and from work to reduce both the tangling and the unintended flossing. Likewise on roller coasters, though that's more a mercy for people behind me.

If you're putting your hair into a ponytail outside on a windy day, face upwind.

I also use the trick of twisting the hair into a chignon and sticking two sticks (chopsticks, pencils, paint brushes: whatever comes to hand) through it. That holds remarkably firmly and gets it out of the way. It has also caused neighbors to fail to recognize me. I guess all they see is the hair.

Sitting next to people at a table and having them put their elbows on my hair is an irreproducible experience. So is tucking my shirt into my waistband and finding out that I've tucked my hair in as well.

It's almost impossible to find an ordinary rubber band in our house, because I've saturated the environment with coated hair rubber bands instead. That way I can always find one. (Don't use ordinary rubber bands in hair -- it sticks to them, tangles up, and pulls it out by the roots.)

In addition to the beater rod on the vacuum cleaner, my hair loves to wrap around the axles of the wheels of my desk chair. It drags as often as it rolls these days, even though I clean them out with needlenose pliers every month or so.

skylark
08-06-2012, 11:28 PM
I can just about sit on mine.

The last time I had it cut was a few months after my daughter was born. You know how they say you lose the extra hair after pregnancy? I think all mine fell out at the same time. I washed it one day and there was this unbelievable matted tangle. I couldn't sort it. My mother (who was there because it was the day my daughter was getting christened) couldn't sort it. We ended up cutting the whole lump out and I went to the christening with my hair in a ponytail which kinda hid that it was all different lengths :( I went to the hairdresser the next day and she cut it to one length.

Daughter is now 16, and I can sit on it again.

I brush it once a day and mostly it lives in a single plait. I almost never wear it loose. I do have a fringe, which I cut myself. I consider it far easier (and definitely cheaper) than maintaining shorter hair.

Karen Junker
08-07-2012, 12:43 AM
When I had long hair, it was constantly getting caught on doorknobs as I walked through doors. Also, there was a street person in my area who had a long hair fetish of sorts and he used to follow me home on the bus and try to touch my hair.

I was once mistaken for the country singer (whose name I can't remember at the moment -- Crystal Gayle, perhaps?) when I lived in the south for a while.

Windcutter
08-14-2012, 04:40 AM
I used to have very long hair, but I got tired of accidentally sitting down on it-->not fun. It's waist length now. Your character can do pretty much anything, because hair is very different. Mine is slippery (the nice word is silky, lol), and it almost never knots or tangles, only when it's loose in a very windy weather. I also can't imagine sleeping with my hair in a braid--so uncomfortable. Ponytail, bun with a stick through it, or loose. But some people almost never wear their long hair loose, even at home, because they find it uncomfortable.

Oh, and dark hair--I assume your character has dark hair, too--isn't as noticeable on the carpet or wooden floors or dark-ish/grey car seats. :) If she has blonde hair, it's likely other characters will notice.

Another thing, maybe it was mentioned, too--sometimes random people try to touch your loose hair when they think you won't notice. Like when you are standing in a line. Or riding the bus. Especially if it's curly or wavy. I used to make long sausage curls and dammit no day passed without a complete stranger trying to discreetly check just how much they bounced.

ironmikezero
08-14-2012, 10:45 PM
Women with long hair have always drawn my eye and appreciation.

When I met my wife (she was 19) I was instantly infatuated - her auburn hair was thick and hung just below her waist. It's been decades - let's just say gas was about .50/gallon (US) then - and I'm still enraptured by her tresses. Her hair may be streaked with wings of silver these days, but it still hovers to her dimples and warms my heart at a glance.

She washes it three times (sometimes four) a week and usually wears it loose. She frequently tries different shampoos and conditioners; some she likes well enough to buy again - but she believes in rotating the stock. She sleeps with it loose. She will pile it under a wide brimmed hat when gardening, or braid it when she rides her motorcycle. I love the braid - it acts like a live thing in the wind stream.

Alas, she does shed the occasional strand - usually to be gobbled up by the vacuum's spinning brush. BTW, hair is strong - just a few long strands can restrain the brush's spin and send the small bearings into screaming seizures.

I'm the only one she'll allow to cut her hair - I only trim the split ends (if any). She prefers the length that allows her to sit without sitting on it. That works for me!

Make no mistake, I'd love if she were bald - and she knows it. Her hair is just the icing on my cake.

Dryad
08-16-2012, 02:43 AM
People ask me about the time and care needed for my hair rather often, but likely an important point for your character would be that whatever time is used on hair care doesn't really matter. I don't know how many minutes it takes to comb my hair. I just do it. I wash it daily. It's easy and it takes less time and concern than needed when I had short hair that required styling. I comb my hair only in the bathroom to help contain the loose hair, which is still on the floor everywhere, requiring regular vacuum maintenance. I comb it again before leaving the house. My standard is to leave my hair down, straight.

While in Polynesia, I always wore a flower behind one ear and fit right in, although my hair texture is entirely different from most Polynesians'. Since my hair is thin, it doesn't seem like that much hair. Polynesian hair is generally very thick. I don't recall seeing any Polynesian women with ponytails, although I did see braids and buns. Ponytails could cause hair breakage for some types of Polynesian hair.

I clip my hair back while writing, cooking, hiking, and washing dishes. I generally put a clip on the base of my purse strap so I always have one. Ponytail holders tend to give me headaches. I have to be careful not to get my hair caught in the car door, particularly when a breeze is blowing. Sitting on your hair is unpleasant, so keeping it shorter than that is desirable. (I realize that some people don't mind.) I braid (without using a tie) before going to sleep to avoid major tangles and hair suffocation, although as someone else has mentioned, the braid does tend to wrap around my throat. In fixing that, I've been known to thwack my husband with it. I don't particularly like strangers stopping me to compliment my hair. One of my older neighbors likes to greet me by asking, "Are you the hair lady?" I have no idea what I'm supposed to say to that.

Saoirse
08-16-2012, 03:20 AM
I've always had my hair at least waist-length. I love it long, although most people will tell you it's not in style anymore (not that I give a crap). It's short (just to my shoulders -- feels SO WEIRD) for the summer, but I'll be growing it out.

I have extremely course, naturally curly hair. Which means it's heavy and kinda tough to take care of. I wash it every day, otherwise it gets oily and gross. Doesn't take too long to comb after washing. I divide it into two halves and do one at a time.

My hair sheds everywhere. When I was dating my husband, I used to joke about "leaving souvenirs" at his apartment. It clogs the vaccuum and the tub. I take special care to get rid of any hair I see b/c it sucks to have to snake out the tub and/or cut the hair out of the vaccuum.

I usually wear it in a barrette and then pulled back into a low ponytail. This is mainly b/c I work in an office and although we're casual, my boss doesn't like to see my hair down. And then it just became habit. I used to braid it occasionally, or once when I was anemic and it had thinned out (but was still really, really thick), I'd put it in a bun. Summer is horrid with long hair which is why I get it cut short in the summer.

People are always asking me about donating, and I usually tell them that I'm keeping it. Because it's my hair, you know? Although this time I got 12'' cut and I decided to donate. Seems like a total waste if I don't. But Wigs for Kids, not Locks of Love b/c LOL s a scam.

(I still have the first ponytail from the first time I got my hair significantly chopped in 1990 -- I was 14 -- and it's a bit weird to hang on to it, but it's a milestone. And I'm weird.)

Hair does get caught places, oh yeah.

When I worked in fast food, I used to have two ponytails. One at my nape and the other about halfway down b/c I couldn't leave the rest hanging....

Drying it? Forget it. I refuse to use a blowdryer b/c it frizzes so badly so I just let it air dry. It takes a few hours, but I don't really care. I also never use ANY hair care products on it. I've never liked them.

The joys of long hair!

L M Ashton
08-18-2012, 09:12 AM
I have hip-length hair. It's thick and wurly to curly. I use a comb that has teeth about 1/2" apart to comb my hair. Anything else would be ridiculous and would never get through my hair. It takes about 10 minutes to comb it. Because I live in a tropical country, I keep it in a braid, which also means that combing once a day is fine. It took two, maybe three years to reach this length with 3-4" trims twice or three times a year.

I shampoo maybe 2 or 3 times a month, otherwise use conditioner only. I don't use any products on my hair otherwise (except for henna to cover my white roots) and don't style. No curling or straightening irons, no blow dryers ever. My hair takes about a day and a half to two days to dry when braided. If left loose, it'll take at least 12 hours to dry.

I also live in a country where this length of hair is common, and even longer is not that unusual, and short hair is the more unusual. Plus here, coconut oil has traditionally been used to keep hair in good condition. And yes, it works. Very very very well.

I shed a lot. Hairballs can be found everywhere...

Wayward Daughter
08-18-2012, 09:47 AM
Just to throw in my own two cents as someone with long hair (which is quite thin)...

My hair is surprisingly easier to manage the longer it becomes. I brush it twice a day for a couple of minutes just to get the tangles out, and wash it once-twice a week. I use an organic shampoo (which I must repeat) and conditioner which I only apply to the last 5 or so inches. Otherwise my hair just becomes oily too quickly.

My hair constantly falls out, but that is also due to health problems so I'm probably not the greatest to answer for the 'average' loss of hair. It took me about two years to grow it from shoulder-length to hip-length including next to no trims. It's growth has now slowed quite a lot.

I wear my hair down 99% of the time, occasionally I use a headband to keep it out of my eyes. Oh, and when it rains or I eat soup I tuck it into my jacket to keep it out of the way.

backslashbaby
08-18-2012, 11:01 AM
Mine's easier, too, I think. Mine is thick and curly enough that it's finally manageable if it's very long. It's so wide, wild and crazy shorter (with less weight)!

It's no hotter than when I kept it about shoulder length because I always have to put it up in the summers here anyway. It's entirely too hot and humid for me to leave it down unless it's buzzed off (which I've done, too!).

I had it just barely touching my shoulders in 2009, and now it's nearly at my waist, however many inches per year that is. I get about 3 inches cut off here and there (every 6 months?), so keep that in mind if you do the math.

It's kind of funny: I also have little extremely curly pieces by my face that never grow even an inch long. What's up with that, lol? They are my only hairstyling woes, those whispies :D