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View Full Version : Rate-a-Poem: The Force That Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower



William Haskins
01-11-2006, 06:47 AM
okay, since we've had a bit of fun with poor ol' dylan the past couple of days, let's see how he rates.

_______________________________________________

By Dylan Thomas (http://www.dylanthomas.com/)
1914-1953


The Force That Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower

The force that through the green fuse drives the flower
Drives my green age; that blasts the roots of trees
Is my destroyer.
And I am dumb to tell the crooked rose
My youth is bent by the same wintry fever.

The force that drives the water through the rocks
Drives my red blood; that dries the mouthing streams
Turns mine to wax.
And I am dumb to mouth unto my veins
How at the mountain spring the same mouth sucks.

The hand that whirls the water in the pool
Stirs the quicksand; that ropes the blowing wind
Hauls my shroud sail.
And I am dumb to tell the hanging man
How of my clay is made the hangman's lime.

The lips of time leech to the fountain head;
Love drips and gathers, but the fallen blood
Shall calm her sores.
And I am dumb to tell a weather's wind
How time has ticked a heaven round the stars.

And I am dumb to tell the lover's tomb
How at my sheet goes the same crooked worm.

mkcbunny
01-11-2006, 10:41 AM
5. same crooked worm. love it.

And I am dumb to tell a weather's wind
How time has ticked a heaven round the stars

There's something about the pattern and speech here that seems of its time and place.

Paint
01-12-2006, 01:06 AM
I can't get my head around this one. I don't like the "Am I dumb" thing. I like the title and first line. Verse three is good, maybe that should be the whole poem...

poetinahat
01-12-2006, 02:36 PM
Thomas perplexes me in some ways: his images are florid, and his verse seems to burst from enthusiasm. I have a record of him reading some of his works, and on first listening, I was surprised not to hear him bellowing the words!

I find this poem at just the level I most enjoy: clear, but not prosaic; dense and metaphorical, yet not requiring a raft of footnotes. Formal, but exhilarating.

To me, it's stirring, and I wonder whether his muteness expresses awe or frustration at knowing his unity with the forces of the world. The possibility of several emotions is what makes this poem live for me.

Ralyks
01-12-2006, 04:07 PM
I like this one. A little bit morbid and a little bit hopeful at the same time. I love the "sound" on first reading, but it took 2-3 readings to really grasp the meaning; which is fine.

P.H.Delarran
01-18-2006, 11:37 AM
... his images are florid, and his verse seems to burst from enthusiasm.
I find this poem at just the level I most enjoy: clear, but not prosaic; dense and metaphorical, yet not requiring a raft of footnotes. Formal, but exhilarating.

To me, it's stirring, and I wonder whether his muteness expresses awe or frustration at knowing his unity with the forces of the world. The possibility of several emotions is what makes this poem live for me.

Poet expresses much of my feelings towards the poem, and towards what little of Thomas's work I have read.
I don't so much see frustration, but yes, maybe awe..or just an inability to truly communicate the connection. How would one communicate with a rose, or the wind, or a tomb, anyway?
I gave it a 5.

Godfather
01-10-2007, 02:59 AM
this is gotta be one of my favourite thomas poems.

up until recently, i never read much poetry, but i have plenty books. one night i got a burst of inspiration to read poetry, and the collected dylan thomas was the first thing i thought to read. this was where i stumbled upon 24 years, and i fell in love with him (i've since resigned to reading him from an anthology of 20th century poetry, it's more accessible), and this has got to be among my favourite poems. by any poet. i've read it so much now, i can almost remember it.

yeah, thomas and ginsberg are who i read mostly now. i read 'america' almost every night. have it marked with the king of diamonds. shame you died so young on us dylan. one of the greatest poets ever ever. ever.

Billytwice
01-10-2007, 06:08 AM
Well, what can I say?
If it was translated back into Welsh and held up to a mirror, then I think I'd stand a better chance of understanding and maybe even enjoying it.
I've looked through the window of his writing shed, drank Earl Grey tea on his veranda and sat on his settee, all to no avail.
I put it down to his heavy drinking...

C.bronco
01-10-2007, 06:23 AM
I gave it a 3, but that's my personal reaction. I imagine this next to Yusef Komunyakaa's "Water Buffalo," and it doesn't hold a candle. Different reader, different era.

"I'm no match for that fire,
For what's in a heart?"