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REMLIG
07-12-2012, 01:24 AM
I need to pick a name for a HUNTING DOG that is in my novel.

Please let me know which ones you like. Pick a few if you are so inclined. Or if you have something better in mind let me know.


Ammo
Bullet
Reload
Remington
Magnum
Winchester
Hunter
Admiral
General
Crowfoot
Crockett
Capstick
Corbett
Boone
Hemingway
Nugent
Selby

I can forget and one last one.... Cheney

waylander
07-12-2012, 01:26 AM
Nimrod - a mighty hunter before God

alleycat
07-12-2012, 01:26 AM
What kind of hunting dog? Birds? 'Coons? Retriever?

I kind of like Remington.

lorna_w
07-12-2012, 01:31 AM
I like Nugent a lot--very funny.

My BIL hunts, and he names his dogs regular girls' names, or if the breeder picked one, he generally keeps it. Just saying, you can go against type or be ironic, too.

veinglory
07-12-2012, 01:33 AM
It does rather depend, as mentioned above, on what kind of hunting dog it is.

smoothseas
07-12-2012, 02:33 AM
From your list, I'd choose Remington.

Once knew a beautiful Blue Tick with the name Rommel (as in Desert Fox.)

REMLIG
07-12-2012, 02:38 AM
It does rather depend, as mentioned above, on what kind of hunting dog it is.

The owner/character is a big game hunter but also hunts birds, upland game and he is also a fisherman.

ladyleeona
07-12-2012, 05:01 AM
The owner/character is a big game hunter but also hunts birds, upland game and he is also a fisherman.

A big game hunter would likely want something to trail animals (more hound variety), while a bird hunter usually wants a retriever/pointer/flusher.

Those traits (trailing and retrieving/pointing/flushing), as far as I know, aren't skill sets that overlap in a single breed of dog. So you might want to pick whether the MC has a hound dog or a bird dog first, before trying to come up with name.

As far as the names: I love the name Remington, but I am biased, because I've got a ridgeback named Lord Remington LaRoo of Tsavo. (Coincidentally, out of all those names, he answers to none them *shrugs*)

ETA: We call my dog Roo, because as others have mentioned, one-syllable names seem to work better. Hunting scenarios can be intense, and therefore the less time you spend saying your dog's 37-word/syllable name, the quicker you can get to the command that's needed.

frimble3
07-12-2012, 05:08 AM
The owner/character is a big game hunter but also hunts birds, upland game and he is also a fisherman.
What kind of a man is he? Is he practical, naming the dog something easy to shout, and not to be confused with another command? Crockett, maybe. Is he sentimental, naming it after a family dog? A traditionalist? (All our hounds have been called 'Bugle') Would he name a dog for a moment's joke? Or just give it a generic name, a quick label? "Blue".

shaldna
07-12-2012, 10:20 AM
Okay, while I like the concept of giving a dog a name that is cute for it's job, you have to look at the practicalities of the name as well.

Hunting dogs - and by that I mean real, working dogs (not just hunting, but any working dogs) tend to have short, one syllable names. Just look at sheepdog trails - you'll have Meg, Con, Jim, Bill, Sal etc - short names that can be fired out like a command.

The same goes for hunting. I've had collies and spaniels all my life, and the same ting applies - short, sharp names are the most effective.

Look at it this way - calling a name is like issuing a command, the longer and more complicated the command, the easier it is to get lost in translation. Short and neat.

I had a springer/collie that I stupidly named Elizabeth - in practical terms that didn't work. Ended up as Bess.

You'll also want a name that doesn't sound like a command, so the dog doesn't get confused - this is especially important in environments or situations where sound might not travel well, or get distorted - such as wind etc.

For the record, out of all the names you have chosen, Boone is the one I would go for because it fits all the practical boxes.

EDITED TO ADD:

You need to consider the type of dog you are looking at. You mentioned 'big game' hunting - to me that is lions etc, and for that you would be looking at something like a Ridgeback - with the size and strength - a spaniel is going to be no use to you here.

If you are hunting small animals - rabbits etc - then you want a terrier - a jack russel, or a dachshund.

If you are hunting birds then you want a fetch and retrieve dog - something like a spaniel, or a labrador - although cocker and springer spaniels are the most effective here.

Some breeds have in built tendancies - look at Border collies - they have a herd instinct. Our current collie, without any herd/sheep training, does it on his own - he rounds up the chickens on his own, seemingly for fun, and I've watched while he corners, directs and herds the cat to where he wants her to go.

The point I'm making is similar to a point that's been raised above - different breeds have different skill sets and different abilities, and they are not necessarily interchangable.

L. Y.
07-12-2012, 10:48 AM
Cheney...:ROFL:

How about Scout, or Shadow? I do like Remington...maybe "Remi" as a nickname?

TudorRose
07-12-2012, 11:31 AM
What kind of a man is he? Is he practical, naming the dog something easy to shout, and not to be confused with another command? Crockett, maybe. Is he sentimental, naming it after a family dog? A traditionalist? (All our hounds have been called 'Bugle') Would he name a dog for a moment's joke? Or just give it a generic name, a quick label? "Blue".

THIS. Start with the owner -- his character, background, education and interests.

Is he an educated man who might choose a name from mythology or literature? Ex-military, who might name him after a famous general? Sci-fi enthusiast who'd choose something Trekkie? etc...

mirandashell
07-12-2012, 04:41 PM
My test for a dumb name for a dog? Shout it out in front of a command.

"Remington, sit!'
"Winchester, down!"
"Hemingway, stay!"

DeleyanLee
07-12-2012, 04:57 PM
We presently have four dogs, two of which are hunting beagles. While all the dogs have two syllable proper names, when push comes to shove, all the dogs have a one-syllable nickname that they respond to and gets used whenever it's a situation where we need to get their attention and reaction quick.

So, Daisy becomes "Daze". Hector becomes "Pud" (long story there, but he answers to it). Bastian becomes "Baz" and Londo become "Lon".

But as there is some thought that dogs only hear the first syllable anyway, it makes sense to me why they respond to a shortening of their names.

ladyleeona
07-12-2012, 07:17 PM
My test for a dumb name for a dog? Shout it out in front of a command.

"Remington, sit!'
"Winchester, down!"
"Hemingway, stay!"

hahaha.

My dad currently has two ridgeback pups he's training to trail deer. They're wee devils, so when no one else is around, I call one Damn and the other It.

"Sit, Damn It!"
"Damn It, NO!"

mirandashell
07-12-2012, 09:39 PM
LOL!

REMLIG
07-12-2012, 09:43 PM
Depends on time period and area of the piece too. Old favorites would be Blue for a blue tick and maybe Elvis or Oscar or Droopy would be good also for an old floppy faced hound dog.

The time period is modern day time. Some place between the 70s-80s and today.

Why Elvis? Was he a hunter?


What kind of a man is he? Is he practical, naming the dog something easy to shout, and not to be confused with another command? Crockett, maybe. Is he sentimental, naming it after a family dog? A traditionalist? Would he name a dog for a moment's joke? Or just give it a generic name, a quick label? "Blue".

He is a manly man, thrill seeker into extreme sports.Nothing about him is practical.

Yes, he would give the dog a name as a joke. Like Cheney.

No, he wouldn't give the dog a generic name. The more unusual the better.

The dog could have a nickname, a shortened version of its pedigree name.

Thank you all. I love some of your suggestions.I think we off to a great start!

REMLIG
07-12-2012, 10:54 PM
As far as the names: I love the name Remington, but I am biased, because I've got a ridgeback named Lord Remington LaRoo of Tsavo.
We call my dog Roo, because as others have mentioned, one-syllable names seem to work better.

What a cool name!

veinglory
07-12-2012, 11:05 PM
What i was asking was more the type of dog and what it hunted. That establishes what the dog does (retrieve, track, course, tree or actually harry as in a pig dog) and what it looks like--also whether it will be voice commanded in a pack.

In my experience hunting dog names are short and just names, not hunting themed. If there is only one dog, "dog" is not uncommon. Most of the names on the list seem too fancy to me.

But if he is a dilettante and the dog is not trained for a specific kind of hunting, I guess he could call it anything. (But hunters might laugh at him behind his back).

backslashbaby
07-12-2012, 11:34 PM
The best hunting dog I knew was a lab named Maddie. That guy was a very serious hunter, but I don't know how the name came about.

We had a Walker named Dan :) The breeder chose the name.

I think Cheny would be funny and unusual. It could be like Maddie, where the second syllable isn't really emphasized when yelling it.

REMLIG
07-13-2012, 04:46 AM
If there is only one dog, "dog" is not uncommon.

I also like your idea just call him "Dog".

Squirrel on a Ledge
07-13-2012, 05:08 AM
Since the character is a big game hunter, it might be fun to name the dog after a famous explorer. Something like "Dr. David Livingstone" might be fun.

StephanieFox
07-13-2012, 05:33 AM
Back woods hunters tend to give their dogs fairly simple names. Big game hunters, on the other hand, might be more literary since they are probably of an upper class. Shamus for an Irish setter, or Dylan for a retriever. But, I don't know if big game hunters use dogs.

Canotila
07-13-2012, 07:08 AM
Field dogs tend to have a one or two syllable call name. I could see someone naming their hunting dog Remington but just calling him Rem or Remy. Something that doesn't sound garbled if you bellow it across a field.

My cousin's field lab is named Cletus. He's a hardcore upland bird hunter but that's the only thing he can do.

If you want a single dog that does both birds and big game, that's going to be a special dog. If your character is serious about hunting both it'd be more believable if he had two dogs, a bird dog and a big game dog.

What kind of big game are you hunting? Deer? Hogs? Coyotes?

Is the dog a catch dog or is he tracking?

What kind of birds is he hunting? Upland or waterfowl?

For catching big game, you see a lot of bulldogs, curs, some hounds, some mastiffs, and purpose bred mixes of all of the above. Stuff like:

American bulldogs
Catahoula bulldogs
American pit bull terriers
Plott hounds
Great danes (usually mixed)
Catahoula leopard cur
Blackmouth cur
Mountain cur
Deer beagles
American staghounds
Running walkers
Dogo argentino

Scent hounds are mostly used for tracking and baying at stuff. Sight hounds are for coursing and catching, though some will track too. The biggest legal stuff you can get with sight hounds is mostly coyote, though some states allow you to hunt deer with hounds and I know one crazy dude who hunts wild boar (successfully) with his saluki and a big knife.

Some hunters blend in giant schnauzer and airedale in their purpose bred mixes. There are other terrier breeds some hunters like to use or breed into their lines. Now, none of the above are used in bird hunting at all.

Then you have your bird dogs. All the spaniels, the pointers, the retrievers. In my experience, you probably won't find a bird dog that will willingly go head to head with large game. They have too much self preservation instinct. You can train one to track game.

Wirehaired pointing griffons are a great all purpose bird pointing/retrieving and big game tracking dog. One of the best things about the breed is how incredibly versatile they are as individuals. It's not unheard of for an individual griff to track boar, point on upland birds, do water retrieves, and hang out with the kids in between times. Ours was named Charlie.

toogrey2
07-13-2012, 07:26 AM
Owned German Shorthaired Pointers for years. Used them for pointing and retrieving. Found short one syllable names work best. Think about trying to be quiet in the field- "Kate" is not as noisey as "Reminton". That is why many hunters use handsignals to hunt.

Canotila
07-13-2012, 08:11 PM
Owned German Shorthaired Pointers for years. Used them for pointing and retrieving. Found short one syllable names work best. Think about trying to be quiet in the field- "Kate" is not as noisey as "Reminton". That is why many hunters use handsignals to hunt.

Another good point, and it illustrates a fundamental difference between bird hunting and other game.

A lot of the curs and hounds bay on a track so noise really doesn't matter. There are a few silent tracking strains out there but it's something you have to look for. And with coursing hounds, you usually want to flush out the rabbits/fox/raccoons/coyotes/whatever so noise isn't as big of a deal there either.

shaldna
07-14-2012, 11:23 AM
My cousin's field lab is named Cletus. He's a hardcore upland bird hunter but that's the only thing he can do.

I just wanted to say that Cletus is the best name ever for a dog.


If you want a single dog that does both birds and big game, that's going to be a special dog. If your character is serious about hunting both it'd be more believable if he had two dogs, a bird dog and a big game dog.

Not so sure about this. I mean, dogs specialise, but so so hunters - I hunt, and I can tell you a hundred ways to get a fox, but I leave it to the terrier men to get the rabbits. The same way that the terrier men don't try to take pheasant - they leave that to the gun men. Hunting well takes skill and time and patience. Most folk specialise.




Owned German Shorthaired Pointers for years. Used them for pointing and retrieving. Found short one syllable names work best. Think about trying to be quiet in the field- "Kate" is not as noisey as "Reminton". That is why many hunters use handsignals to hunt.

Hand signals are important - our collie is still learning the basics, but he's getting there. However, you can't rely on hand signals either, as there will be times where the dog cannot get a clear line of sight to you. In those instances you'll be relying on whistles and clicks or single syllable commands - again, have a look at some sheepdog trials, there are loads of them on youtube, you'll see how simple noises become commands.


Another good point, and it illustrates a fundamental difference between bird hunting and other game.

A lot of the curs and hounds bay on a track so noise really doesn't matter. There are a few silent tracking strains out there but it's something you have to look for. And with coursing hounds, you usually want to flush out the rabbits/fox/raccoons/coyotes/whatever so noise isn't as big of a deal there either.

The law about hunting with dogs is changing here. It's already changed in some areas - where we currently hunt with a pack of maybe 30 dogs and the dogs catch the game and break it's neck, we will, in future, have to shoot the game instead. Apparently this is more 'humane' - although those folk making these laws clearly have no idea how long an injured animal might survive following a gunshot, and the slow and painful death they will have. as opposed to being killed isntantly by a trained dog.

The other alternatives - such as gassing out a warren or set - don't bear thinking about. The idea of keeping an animal in pain for hours or days doesn't sit with me. I'm very much pro-hunting (a stance that doesn't sit well with non-rural folk who have never seen what a fox can do to a feild of sheep, or seen the mess that occurs when a horse puts it's foot into a rabbit hole) but the government is coming down on folks like me, restricting what we can and can't hunt, when, where, how.

Canotila
07-14-2012, 01:06 PM
Not so sure about this. I mean, dogs specialise, but so so hunters - I hunt, and I can tell you a hundred ways to get a fox, but I leave it to the terrier men to get the rabbits. The same way that the terrier men don't try to take pheasant - they leave that to the gun men. Hunting well takes skill and time and patience. Most folk specialise.

I have to agree with this as well. I know a lot of hunters and only know one who hunts both birds and big game. He only has a bird dog though, and hunts big game on foot with a human buddy. Out here though, people will go for elk, deer, coyote, cougar, etc. and be successful with it. Bird hunting is a whole other bag. Sort of like the difference in skill needed for fly fishing vs. normal fishing. The guy I know that does it just absolutely loves hunting, and this way he's able to be out in the field a lot of the year the way the hunting seasons overlap.



The law about hunting with dogs is changing here. It's already changed in some areas - where we currently hunt with a pack of maybe 30 dogs and the dogs catch the game and break it's neck, we will, in future, have to shoot the game instead. Apparently this is more 'humane' - although those folk making these laws clearly have no idea how long an injured animal might survive following a gunshot, and the slow and painful death they will have. as opposed to being killed isntantly by a trained dog.

The other alternatives - such as gassing out a warren or set - don't bear thinking about. The idea of keeping an animal in pain for hours or days doesn't sit with me. I'm very much pro-hunting (a stance that doesn't sit well with non-rural folk who have never seen what a fox can do to a feild of sheep, or seen the mess that occurs when a horse puts it's foot into a rabbit hole) but the government is coming down on folks like me, restricting what we can and can't hunt, when, where, how.

That's a shame. When my borzois get their jaws on a raccoon it's shake shake shake, three times exactly, its neck is broke and it's dead. It takes a split second, and incredibly humane compared to shooting or poisoning. They don't even break the skin.

Our state outlawed cougar and bear hunting with hounds. Next thing you know, there's a cougar and bear population explosion and they started moving into urban areas. Now the state uses taxpayer money to hire professional houndsmen to do the exact same thing in the name of predator control, when the premise behind outlawing it was supposedly because it was inhumane.

People also forget hounds don't have to kill or harm their prey. My male borzoi (Strider) always brings critters back live-in-hand if they don't try to bite the crap out of his face. He's never killed a rabbit, but he's caught many. My friend who boar hunts with his saluki used to hunt a baited feed station with his dog and his friend's hog dogs. They would capture the boars alive, hogtie them and sell them to a game farm. He's definitely crazy.

If people were open to it, I think there's a small niche of hunters who'd be interested in wolf management the czarist way. The hounds catch it, the hunters ride up, hogtie it, and take it somewhere else. Similar to how Karelian bear dogs are used to keep grizzlies afraid of cattle in Montana. Fun for the hunters and dogs, the livestock don't get eaten, and fewer wolves get shot.

backslashbaby
07-15-2012, 12:26 AM
Canotila, Maddie's owner hunted wild boar, too, in Hungary where we all lived at the time :) Maddie only helped him find the hog; she was much better at hunting birds (a Labrador).

That dude didn't specialize. He hunted the boar with a bow and arrow, on foot! He was obsessed, though, so he'd only work for a similarly obsessed, kinda crazy, Imperialist-on-African-safari kind of character (as he was), imho. I don't know how he came to name Maddie, but she was amazing.

Canotila
07-15-2012, 10:42 AM
Canotila, Maddie's owner hunted wild boar, too, in Hungary where we all lived at the time :) Maddie only helped him find the hog; she was much better at hunting birds (a Labrador).

That dude didn't specialize. He hunted the boar with a bow and arrow, on foot! He was obsessed, though, so he'd only work for a similarly obsessed, kinda crazy, Imperialist-on-African-safari kind of character (as he was), imho. I don't know how he came to name Maddie, but she was amazing.

She sounds like a fantastic dog! One of those special one in a thousand hunting dogs.

StephanieFox
07-15-2012, 09:42 PM
Good dog stories. My don't won't even chase the rabbits in our garden. As she says, "That's for working dogs. I'm a princess and I have people to do that for me."

REMLIG
07-15-2012, 10:07 PM
Thank you all for your help.

The hunting dog in the novel, doesn't have any scenes where it hunts. He's just a retired hunting dog with a cool name that's now a house pet.

REMLIG
07-16-2012, 10:10 AM
I was wondering is there a preference with hunters when selecting a dog to hunt, do they prefer a male or female dog?

Does it matter? I'm sure it might when a female goes into 'heat'.

L. Y.
07-16-2012, 10:41 AM
I once asked a friend of mine who has hunted for 20+ years. He told me it has nothing to do with the sex of the dog, but its personality.

EDIT: He has had a number of dogs over the years, some male, some female.

Canotila
07-16-2012, 11:07 AM
It's the individual dog that matters.

As far as intact dogs working, if they're trained well most can work side by side no problem. It's just another distraction you have to proof them for. I wouldn't take a girl out in standing heat because who knows what kind of off leash intact males we might run into, but she could in theory still work fine. My males never had any issues being distracted by girls in season once I told them to leave it.

Depending on the breed, they'll come into season once or twice a year.

veinglory
07-16-2012, 06:24 PM
Hunting dogs don't need to be intact unless you are planning to breed from them.

WeaselFire
07-16-2012, 06:31 PM
Bingo was his name-o! :)

Seriously, beagles named Bingo, Max and Lulu. And an Irish setter mix named Princess.

Alright, none of the names we used would likely set the proper tone for this.

For big game, a Mastiff named Caesar. For birds, a pointer named Chesterfield. For small game, a Blue Tick named Beauregard.

Jeff

shaldna
07-17-2012, 01:36 PM
I know that our kennels neuter all of the hounds so it's never a problem.

There's a mix of male and female, sex doesn't matter so much as the dog's personality and ability. That said, if a dog doesn't make the grade then it goes - can't afford to keep working dogs as pets.

Working dogs are pretty hard to rehome - they don't usually do well as pets because they have never been a pet - this seems to be the case for the majority of working dogs - including police and guide dogs etc, I was at a demo with guidedogs a couple of years ago and they asked that people don't pat or stroke the dogs because they aren't used to it while they are working and it can confuse them and get them into 'play' mode when they are meant to be working. It was pretty interesting stuff.

I know our hunt prefer to rehome retired dogs to homes that don't have kids for that reason - the dogs aren't used to being made a fuss of and don't cope very well with the constant attention of a child who wants to play. The dogs have usually had a very structured life until that point, with clearly defined roles and routines and while they can make brilliant pets, it takes a lot of time to readjust.