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View Full Version : Miyazaki's Films Re-Imagined as Dog-eared Penguin Paperbacks



Alessandra Kelley
07-05-2012, 06:44 AM
http://io9.com/5913659/miyazakis-films-reimagined-as-dog+eared-penguin-book-covers

Squee! As a tremendous fan of Miyazaki Hayao's oeuvre, not to mention being a sometime cover artist and a fan of the old Penguin paperbacks, I found this fan art adorable and pretty well done.

LOG
07-05-2012, 06:59 AM
They took a character or notable object from each film and flattened it . . . not really all that impressive, I'm sorry to say.

Alessandra Kelley
07-05-2012, 07:17 AM
They took a character or notable object from each film and flattened it . . . not really all that impressive, I'm sorry to say.

Aw, you don't like the abstract graphic quality?

SomethingOrOther
07-05-2012, 08:11 AM
I like the graphics but it could have been so much better if he put a lot more effort into the text.

This is only a quick effort on my part, so it won't be perfect:

http://i.imm.io/v96x.png

Also, it's not a true Miyazaki paperback unless you dress it in a skirt and snap a picture from below. :)

J.S.F.
07-05-2012, 08:47 AM
I like Miyazaki's works but I don't 'squee' over them like others do.:)

I wasn't all that impressed. The Totoro pic was nice as was the Spirited Away 'mask' but the rest are just flattened down images with no spark of life in them and nothing which would make me buy the book (if I used covers as my guide).

Guess I'll have to stick to watching the movies....

Shadow_Ferret
07-05-2012, 09:49 PM
The whole thing is lost on me. Have no idea who miyazaki is, nor do I remember any penguin books that boring.

Alessandra Kelley
07-05-2012, 10:26 PM
I believe they were intended to be reminiscent of these. (http://www.flickr.com/photos/joekral/sets/72157594264351021/)

Jcomp
07-05-2012, 11:08 PM
I like them, but I wonder of the legality of selling art explicitly based on and name-dropping copyrighted material.

Alessandra Kelley
07-05-2012, 11:49 PM
I like them, but I wonder of the legality of selling art explicitly based on and name-dropping copyrighted material.

Good point. Totoro is so iconic in Japan, it would be like Andy Warhol painting Mickey Mouse (http://www.prints.co.nz/page/fine-art/PROD/8587), except Warhol explicitly got permission from Disney first, so the situations are not truly comparable.

In fact, you bring up an excellent point, and one that could cause the artist grief. (http://www.theartnewspaper.com/articles/No-longer-appropriate/26378)