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Tiarnan_Ceinders
06-11-2012, 01:30 AM
Hi,

This is a question that's been bothering me for years, and is one of the hang-ups I have that keep me from starting work on my novel.

I love the fantasy genre, and I've been reading voraciously (in english) since I was twelve years old.

I've written blogs, articles, short stories and even worked a while for a gaming company as lead author. All in english. So I feel perfectly at home writing in both english and swedish - and with an inclination towards english.

But would I even stand a chance submitting my work to an agent or a publishing house outside of my country? The dreamer in me says that the only thing that should matter is the quality of the script, but the realist in me argues that it'd be a whole lot harder to do business for an agent with an author in another country.

I guess you could say "why don't you write in swedish then?", and I would. Only, the market for fantasy in Sweden is a lot smaller than the english-speaking market. There are only a handful of published authors, and I've yet to see a book from the fantasy genre really catch on. So, I tend to feel like my best shot would be to write in english and try to attract an agent in London (which isn't an impossible distance to cover)?

kaitie
06-11-2012, 01:41 AM
I think it complicates matters a bit in terms of taxes and that sort of thing, but there really isn't a reason you couldn't have an agent in another country. When I lived in another country, I submitted to American agents, and it seems that it's fairly common to get queries from various parts of the world.

There isn't a good reason not to, though, I think. If you'd like to aim for the English-speaking market, go for it. :)

Corinne Duyvis
06-11-2012, 02:33 AM
This question gets asked a lot here. The answer is always: it doesn't matter. You don't even need to target agents in London specifically. Plenty of NY agents have overseas clients. Target whichever agent you want. In this day and age of e-mail, no one will care.

waylander
06-11-2012, 02:35 AM
Plenty of writers have agents in a country that is not the one they live in. The most important factor is that the work you are offering the agent is suitable for the market they sell to. As almost all communication is done by e-mail it is insignificant that you are in a different coutnry.

Tiarnan_Ceinders
06-11-2012, 02:01 PM
Thanks for the answers! I'm glad it isn't a problem. Now I look forward to finding another way to procrastinate writing the book. =)

Araenvo
06-11-2012, 05:53 PM
The Internet especially has broken down the barriers between agents and writers in different countries. My agent lives n the other side of the Atlantic to me! UK agents always have overseas partners and sub-agents anyway - as do US, and, in fact, all agents. So the country doesn't really matter. If you're writing in English, UK, US, NZ, Aussie - it's all good

(Though check agents' websites, since some do say they prefer authors who live in the same country)

Bron
06-12-2012, 01:08 PM
I've had requests from agents that live over 15,000km from me. You'll be fine :-) Now stop procrastinating and start writing!

Mr Flibble
06-12-2012, 04:50 PM
My agents lives (er, checking) 4740 odd miles away from me. My editor? Less than 30 miles away....

ETA: The only issue I have is the time difference - I tend to get emails at 2 am :D

Pato L.
06-15-2012, 07:30 PM
Great question, Tiarnan. I too am a wannabe foreigner writer hoping to write fantasy in English. It sure feels like an extra barrier to an already difficult field, but the replies were reassuring!

Jamesaritchie
06-15-2012, 07:58 PM
It's never been a problem. Writers from all over the world were using U.S. agents and publishers since the first agent opened her doors, and since publishing became a business in America.

Araenvo
06-15-2012, 09:58 PM
I actually really like the time difference! It makes waiting for news when things are on sub. etc a lot easier - when I wake up it's already past noon where she is, so often there's an e-mail already waiting for me. Perfect!