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View Full Version : Self-publishing fuels growth of print books (article link)



ios
06-07-2012, 05:19 PM
I found the article on self-publishing and print book growth (http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20120605/MEDIA_ENTERTAINMENT/120609932#ixzz1x0eGZ978) on a Kindleboard's Writer's Cafe post (http://www.kindleboards.com/index.php/topic,116484.0.html). I found it intriguing that this was quoted on that article:


Though the report does not track sales, Bowker noted that the landscape of publishing is changing.

(http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20120605/MEDIA_ENTERTAINMENT/120609932#ixzz1x0eGZ978)
"What was once relegated to the outskirts of our industry—and even took on demeaning names like 'vanity press'—is now not only a viable alternative but what is driving the title growth of our industry today," said Kelly Gallagher, vice president of Bowker Market Research, in a statement. "Self-publishing is a true legitimate power to be reckoned with. Coupled with the explosive growth of e-books and digital content, these two forces are moving the industry in dramatic ways."


What do you think? Have you heard of any other sources that talk about this, back it up, or discredit it?

Thanks,
Jodi

(Article url: http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20120605/MEDIA_ENTERTAINMENT/120609932#ixzz1x0eGZ978)

Old Hack
06-07-2012, 05:37 PM
The article states,


Despite the rapid growth in e-book sales in recent years, print book output in 2011 grew by 6%, to 347,178 titles, compared to the prior year.

All that means is that the number of published books published in 2011 was 6% higher than that published in 2010. It doesn't imply that the numbers sold were any higher. I'd like to see a reliable breakdown of the value of the self-published sector vs the trade-published side, giving turnover and numbers published. Now that would be useful.

I'm disappointed in Ms Gallagher's comment. Self publishing and vanity publishing are two different things, and it's neither correct nor helpful to suggest that they're the same thing, even if it's done indirectly.