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Tinman
06-04-2012, 09:08 AM
If anyone can answer these two questions it will be much appreciated.

Do people who stutter have problems with specific sounds or letters more than others?

And do most people who stutter, also have trouble with sound prolongation? For instance: sssssave instead of s-s-save.

Thanks again.

ThunderBoots
06-04-2012, 09:15 AM
If anyone can answer these two questions it will be much appreciated.

Do people who stutter have problems with specific sounds or letters more than others?

And do most people who stutter, also have trouble with sound prolongation? For instance: sssssave instead of s-s-save.

Thanks again.

I'm afraid I need a little clarification here.

Your first question -- are you asking if people who stutter, in general, share a propensity to have trouble with specific sounds/letters?

Or if a person who stutters will tend to have problems with certain sounds/letters unique to him/herself?

As for your second question ... I'm afraid I don't quite follow you ...

Kerosene
06-04-2012, 09:16 AM
Studdering is hated by my spell check.

I had a small case of studdering when I was a child. "S" "C" and "Z" were my hardest. I still over-pronounce those, but it's not noticeable.
I don't remember that far back, just parent's stories.

I did have a friend who studdered and I actually remember him doing so. It was convulsive and sounded like "S-sa-sa-save..."

Michael Davis
06-04-2012, 02:01 PM
Not a speech expert, but could depend on the nature of the problem (mental, physical, etc). For example, When I was treated for cancer, the chemo they used was very strong. I actually locked on certain words because the "Chemo fog" caused me to pause and go else where in my mind for a second before I recovered and continued my words. Frightened a lot of my old friends, but after a year most of that sputtering went away. So like I said, could depend on the cause of the problem.

Kafff
06-04-2012, 04:48 PM
I can't answer your questions, but I'm still posting in this thread. Why am I doing it? I'm building up my post count, and I figured I could stutter several meaningless posts in this thread instead of a meaningless one, it seemed an appropriate place for being smart.

Changed my mind, somehow. I had a friend who stuttered. The thing which I found surprising was that he could go days without stuttering, and then would begin to stutter on completely unexpected occasions (first I thought he stutters because he somehow finds himself in an awkward situation for whatever reasons, but no, he would stutter just out of the blue while we were alone talking about nothing "traumatic" or "unusual".) I even said, why are you stuttering now, are you hitting on me, you homo, well, then he stuttered even more. So, in a way, he did stutter in awkward situations also. Anyways, when I asked him, why he started stuttering (as a child), he said that it's his grandfather's fault. He would spent a lot of time at grandfather's (parents working?), and once the grandfather said to him: "Don't you start stuttering on me, you'll be punished for it!" And at that point, he started stuttering. That's his version of it, I'm not saying it's an absolute truth. But, when my son in some rare occasions starts forming syllables too slowly, and sometimes on my great displeasure even repeats an occasional one, I just keep patience and bite my tongue. I'm not commenting on it, I'm certainly not.


So, I'm no expert, my only experience is with a stuttering friend (who may well have tried to hit on me), and judging on his behavior:
a) NO, I wouldn't say that some sounds were more stutter-inducing than the other. He went days with normal fluency.
b) I would say in fluent phase NO. In stuttering phase, obviously, he would have problems prolonging an s-sound without breaking it.

Puma
06-04-2012, 05:12 PM
An oddity of stuttering which you may not know about - stuttering frequently disappears if the words are sung instead of spoken. Jim Nabors was a stutterer (Gomer Pyle) and a well known singer without a stutter.

We have a friend who stutters but I can't really give you any answers. Stress does seem to increase the likelihood. My gut feel is to say hard initial sounds are more likely to be stuttered than soft initial sounds. Puma

Tinman
06-05-2012, 02:53 AM
[QUOTE=ThunderBoots;7327341]
Your first question -- are you asking if people who stutter, in general, share a propensity to have trouble with specific sounds/letters?

I'm asking if an individual, as opposed to a group of stutterers, tends to stumble over the same sounds, or if each time it's just as likely to be different sounds or letters.


As for your second question ... I'm afraid I don't quite follow you ..

Sound prolongation: Sssssave, the S is pronounced like a snake's hiss; as opposed to S-s-save, where there is a clear gap between the S-sound.

Thanks!!!

jaksen
06-05-2012, 02:57 AM
And I repeat words or have a hard time pushing them out. And yes I was a teacher. No, I didn't have this issue with children or young people.

Only with adults. No...no...no kidding.

I think that's a stammer, not a stutter.

Fins Left
06-05-2012, 03:06 AM
My dad stuttered and he did seem to have some letters that tripped him up more than others. Words starting with a, s, or d and the word 'I' were the worst for him.

He did not drag out the sound (sssssss)
He would repeat beats (s s st stop that)
For the most part, his speach was normal, but if he was anxious (from internal/external sources) that would cause the stutter to be worse. Once he started to stutter, then the stutter itself made him worse. As he grew older the stuttering stopped almost completely (I think he just quit getting upset about stuff)

When I was young, I would occasionally stammer -almost like a reflex mimic of his speach patterns- but I didn't truely stutter.

Tinman
06-05-2012, 03:06 AM
Will, Michael, Puma, and Kafff, thank you!!!

The POV character in a short I'm editing has experienced an emotional trauma in his life, enough that he buried the incident in his mind and was hospitalized. He suffers from PTSD and he's on prescribed drugs, either of which can be the cause of the stuttering. When I wrote it, I had no plan as far as where the stutters would occur. Upon editing, I thought maybe I was wrong, maybe stutterers had more problems with an S-sound than an M-sound. When I read about it online, someone mentioned sound prolongation.

Again, thanks all.

Tinman
06-05-2012, 03:21 AM
I think that's a stammer, not a stutter.

Jaksen, thanks!!! I always thought stammering was when people who normally have no speech impediments stumble over words, and that stuttering was used for people with speech impediments. I had to look it up lol. The consensus was that they're used interchangeably. Connotatively , I don't know. I might be better off using stammer anyway.

Again, thanks!!

backslashbaby
06-05-2012, 03:21 AM
I had a good friend who stuttered. She did hold her S's out, but her G's were haltingly stuttered. There were a few other sounds, too, that she could have problems with (halting, except her S's), but G's were her main stumbling block.

Tinman
06-05-2012, 03:22 AM
My dad stuttered and he did seem to have some letters that tripped him up more than others. Words starting with a, s, or d and the word 'I' were the worst for him.

He did not drag out the sound (sssssss)
He would repeat beats (s s st stop that)
.

Fins. Thanks!!! That's exactly what I wanted to know.

YeonAh
06-05-2012, 03:30 AM
My little brother has stutter problems too, I'd notice them mostly during vowels at the beginning of the word. And he'd draw it out for a good two seconds or so, like "a...a...and" This usually happens when he's excited/flustered/practicing for a presentation. I have no idea if he does them during the presentation or not, but while practicing with us he gets easily flustered by his stuttering and starts over-compensating with hand-gestures during the two-second-stutter.

Tinman
06-05-2012, 05:17 AM
Thanks Backslash and YeonAh!!!

Seth?
06-06-2012, 04:35 AM
My little brother has a stutter and he goes to speech therapy regularly for it. He has a really serious problem with "S" (specifically the "st" or "sh" sound), "C", "K" (anything with that k! sound), "W" and "R."

For example when he says "stop" it'll sound something like "s-s-st-st-st" pause, while he tries to get a hold on his tongue "STOP." That's his way of making the stutter stop. Try to say it a couple times and finally just say it really slow and distinct.

The "k" sound is the worst for him. A lot of the time he'll just get irritated in the middle of what he's saying and hope that you assume correctly on whatever he's trying to say.

I hope that helps! :)


-Seth

Tinman
06-06-2012, 07:34 AM
Thanks Seth!!! I think I have it. The only thing I have to worry about now is how much stuttering in the dialogue is enough and how much will drive the reader insane. lol.

ThunderBoots
06-06-2012, 08:20 AM
Thanks Seth!!! I think I have it. The only thing I have to worry about now is how much stuttering in the dialogue is enough and how much will drive the reader insane. lol.

Just my two cents, but don't worry about it too much. I believe it's much more frustrating (annoying, painful, etc) to HEAR someone stutter than to READ someone stutter.

[Don't want to go overboard, though, with anything.]

BTW: My mother apparently stuttered all through childhood and into young adulthood. She tackled it through amateur dramatics, and by the time she had kids, you would never know she ever had a problem. I'm not saying this is typical -- just mentioning it.

Tinman
06-06-2012, 10:43 AM
Thanks, Thunderboots!!!

Oahu? You lucky SOB lol.

alimay
06-06-2012, 04:17 PM
Jaksen, thanks!!! I always thought stammering was when people who normally have no speech impediments stumble over words, and that stuttering was used for people with speech impediments. I had to look it up lol. The consensus was that they're used interchangeably. Connotatively , I don't know. I might be better off using stammer anyway.

Again, thanks!!

I could well be wrong, but I thought that 'stutter' and 'stammer' weren't interchangable (although I'm sure they're used that way).

From an interesting essay by David Mitchell, which can be found here:
http://www.stammering.org/mitchell.html

What's the difference? Some authorities maintain 'stutter' and 'stammer' are two words for the same thing, but I subscribe to the following definitions: a stutter is where the first syllable of the word is repeated over and over like a machine gun, without the second ever being reached. A stammer, in contrast, is where not even the first syllable can be articulated: there's just an ever-widening hole in the sentence.

In that same essay, he also writes:

(You can always tell, by the way, if a fictional stammering character is depicted from personal experience: a counterfeit stammers on words beginning with random letters of the alphabet, whilst the real McCoy stammers on words only beginning with two or three.)

Ali

jaksen
06-06-2012, 10:10 PM
Interesting fact about stammerers/stutterers - when they sing, they often lose the stammer. Also, I knew a garage mechanic who stammered (stuttered) terribly when meeting customers. But in the garage, working on a car, talking to another mechanic or asking his helper to hand him tools, do this, do that, etc., no stammer whatsoever.

I also heard this was true of a surgeon. While operating, his voice was smooth and steady. Outside the operating room (theater) he stammered somewhat when talking to patients.

Anyhow...maybe these are just anecdotes and not true in general of all those who stammer or stutter.

Tinman
06-09-2012, 10:44 AM
Anyone interested in how I handled the stuttering (good or bad), I posted an excerpt in SYW Horror. Thanks.