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seun
05-17-2012, 11:02 PM
Anyone know how to address a British magistrate in correspondence if you don't know their surname? 'Dear Sir/Judge/Your Honour?'

ETA: Magistrate, not judge. My bad.

Peter Graham
05-17-2012, 11:55 PM
Sir or Ma'am. Collectively, you can call a whole bench of them "Your Worships", although that is slowly falling out of vogue in much of the country.

Regards,

Peter

Parametric
05-18-2012, 01:13 AM
I address mine as Dad. :tongue Could you give more context? In what context would you write a letter to a magistrate specifically, as opposed to writing to the court in general?

Shakesbear
05-18-2012, 01:20 AM
Here you go:

http://www.magistratescourt.tas.gov.au/practice_directions/2005_No_4_-_Form_of_Address

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judicial_titles_in_England_and_Wales

seun
05-18-2012, 11:50 AM
I address mine as Dad. :tongue Could you give more context? In what context would you write a letter to a magistrate specifically, as opposed to writing to the court in general?

Haha. Class. :D

Only a vague idea at the moment - as a character witness. I'm thinking something along the lines of 'Dear Judge, with regard to Mr So and So, I have known him for twenty years and he's a bloody good egg'.

Well, something like that. Of course, if someone wouldn't actually write to a magistrate for this, I'll come up with a new plan.

onesecondglance
05-18-2012, 12:24 PM
My mother-in-law is a magistrate. In court she is addressed as "Ma'am" by people who know what they're doing and "Yer onerr" by idiot criminals who don't :D

I don't think it's standard practice for matters relating to individual cases to be discussed outstide court, character statements or otherwise. You'd do that in the sight of the court, not in writing to a single magistrate.

seun
05-18-2012, 12:35 PM
I don't think it's standard practice for matters relating to individual cases to be discussed outstide court, character statements or otherwise. You'd do that in the sight of the court, not in writing to a single magistrate.

Bugger. Oh well. A slight change of plan needed in that case. Thanks for the help, all.

Priene
05-18-2012, 12:36 PM
I address mine as Dad.

I believe the correct form is 'Daddio'.

Peter Graham
05-18-2012, 05:29 PM
Only a vague idea at the moment - as a character witness. I'm thinking something along the lines of 'Dear Judge, with regard to Mr So and So, I have known him for twenty years and he's a bloody good egg'.
As a general rule, character witnesses only really come into play when a defendant has been "potted" (to use defence solicitor parlance) and is attempting to rely on their good egg-dom to avoid a one way trip to some smack-infested Victorian rat hole full of addicts, mentalists and thugs.

Character evidence tends to be given in writing - usually in the form of a letter. There is no particular format, but letters are typically addressed either to the defence solicitor who will hand them over in Court, or "to whom it may concern".

So, I see no issue with you using such a letter in your book.

Regards,

Peter

seun
05-19-2012, 12:30 PM
Character evidence tends to be given in writing - usually in the form of a letter. There is no particular format, but letters are typically addressed either to the defence solicitor who will hand them over in Court, or "to whom it may concern".

So, I see no issue with you using such a letter in your book.


Thanks. I'll work on it and see how it goes. :)