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AW Admin
05-10-2012, 10:38 PM
Please watch out for good resources (books as well as online sources) about publishing and the more practical aspects of being a writer and send them to me, either via email or via PM on Absolute Write.

Feel free to suggest FAQ topics or categories, as well as links to posts and threads on AW itself.

You can post questions or suggestions here in this thread or PM them to me or MacAllister or CaoPaux or Old Hack, or evilrooster.

Please only PM ONE of us. You don't want us cross-posting over each other; it could bring down the entire Internet.

Thanks--

HapiSofi
05-11-2012, 08:38 AM
Feel free to use any or all of my not-a-FAQ. Or not use it; it's entirely up to you.

Medievalist
05-11-2012, 08:43 AM
Feel free to use any or all of my not-a-FAQ. Or not use it; it's entirely up to you.

I just repped you (Rep Comments) but I will take you up on that with alacrity ma'am. And thanks much.

Miss Plum
05-12-2012, 09:08 PM
I'd like to see a full description of the publishing process from acceptance to backlisting. All the players at every point, what they do. I saw this on an agent's website once and THOUGHT I bookmarked it, but didn't!

kaitie
05-12-2012, 11:56 PM
Stacia had a great post in another thread about how the editing process is supposed to work. I think it'd be awesome to have that (or something like it) linked somewhere.

Theo81
05-14-2012, 08:47 PM
I'd like to see an FAQ on the differences between publishing/submitting in the UK and the US (and any other markets we can find information on). Stuff like - what's the difference between a query and a covering letter? This agent is recommending I use an editing service like Cornerstones, are they trying to scam me?

merrihiatt
05-15-2012, 05:41 AM
I haven't looked for this yet, so it may already exist, but do we have any kind of commonly used terms with definitions? Especially in self-publishing, I've seen indie, self-published, direct-to-reader all used interchangeably. Also, traditional publisher and trade publisher and book formats (e-book, paperback, etc.). Many times there is confusion when someone is referring to self-publishing when what they have written is e-publishing. That one really sparks a quick response. I don't know if it would help to have a list of definitions, but it seems when threads get derailed due to wording issues, it would be nice to be able to simply direct someone to the common words/definition page rather than having a back-and-forth exchange time and time again.

ETA: I see there is one, but I think I'm talking about something a bit different in that I didn't see any of the terms I mentioned above in Janet Reid's article. Most of her references seemed to be geared toward trade publishing terms (although certainly not all of the words were specifically for trade publishing only).

WriteMinded
06-03-2012, 06:29 PM
I'd like to see a full description of the publishing process from acceptance to backlisting. All the players at every point, what they do. I saw this on an agent's website once and THOUGHT I bookmarked it, but didn't!This.

BUT first I'd like a map or step-by-step outline of the publishing process from the time a WIP is completed to the time it's accepted. I THINK it goes like this: 1. Finished MS. 2. Synposis 3. Query Letter (Hell) 4. Agent/Publisher research 5. Submission

BUT I could be wrong. And under Submission would come subheadings . . . I think . . . maybe? :Shrug:

wonderactivist
06-03-2012, 06:57 PM
I just wanted to suggest a very good resource on contracts. Kristen Nelson's Agenting 101 blog posts lead you from deal points when you get an offer through specific clauses and language in the contract--more clearly than anything else I have read online. She points out specific terms for rights, royalties, payouts, etc. I recommend this resource more than anything else listed. Wish I had seen this before getting my first offer.

Here's the first post:
http://pubrants.blogspot.com/2006/06/agenting-101-part-one.html
(the listing of Agenting 101 posts is in the lower right column.)

Also, I am unable to open the 101 document on the Science Fiction Writers site. Are they now limiting access to their members?

Miss Plum
06-12-2012, 02:35 PM
This.

BUT first I'd like a map or step-by-step outline of the publishing process from the time a WIP is completed to the time it's accepted. I THINK it goes like this: 1. Finished MS. 2. Synposis 3. Query Letter (Hell) 4. Agent/Publisher research 5. Submission

BUT I could be wrong. And under Submission would come subheadings . . . I think . . . maybe? :Shrug:
Thing is, that process isn't always the same. Some agents want one thing, some another. For instance, there might be a synopsis and there might not. There's really no need to research publishers until you are actually offered a deal. It would still be a good subject for a sticky, but in the meantime you could ask about that at the Ask the Agent forum.

For what it's worth, the usual AW process seems to be:


Finish the MS.
Write a query letter (Hell).
Research agents.
Submit per their requirements -- query only, query + synopsis, query + first ten pages, whatever.
Assess any offers of rep according to various considerations that you can ask about in Ask the Agent.

That is a bare-bones checklist that could use a paragraph of expansion on each point. Anyone, please amend as needed!


http://absolutewrite.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=58

Miss Plum
06-12-2012, 10:02 PM
And lo! Random House provides some info:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FlnAFH4HV4&feature=relmfu

It's a Random House promo rather than a tutorial, but it does give a look at the process.

Incidentally, another on producing audio books:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XF_uP21uRxY&feature=relmfu

WriteMinded
06-13-2012, 07:20 PM
Thank you, Miss Plum!!

Miss Plum
06-14-2012, 10:07 AM
Got another outline of the publication process, which INCLUDES querying:

http://www.dsmagency.com/published.html

Miss Plum
06-15-2012, 11:17 PM
Found another essay on process:

http://www.jplm.com/advice.php

shadowwalker
07-10-2012, 03:54 AM
I'm sticking this here because I think it's most relevant - but not sure. And maybe it's been covered but I couldn't think of the right search terms. Anyway...

Every time I see someone post a link to an article about writing, publishing, agents, etc, I wonder - how do they find these things? I've done some googling for blogs but there are thousands - so how do I know which ones to choose to follow (I've been running about 50/50 worthwhile versus junk so far)? And which publications are actually knowledgeable versus just attention-grabbing (I guess "news" type versus "this is my opinion" type)?

I'd like to be able to keep up with the latest discussions/articles/whatever, but I don't want to spend all my time on the 'net either, so I guess I'm wondering if there's a recommended list somewhere here (or if one could be developed) so we could keep up with things in a time-well-spent manner?

CaoPaux
08-07-2012, 03:23 AM
Since no one else is willing to share their secrets .... :hat: For the most part, I start with someone/thing I trust (i.e., Writer Beware Blogs! (http://accrispin.blogspot.com/)), and take note of who/what they link to, with further note of who/what they to, etc. Keeping within, say, three degrees of separation gives me a core list of the major who/what/where/why without becoming overwhelming.

AW Admin
08-07-2012, 03:25 AM
I follow a bunch of blogs/sites from people I know, or from people in areas I'm interested in via subscribing to them in Google Reader.

I choose who/what to follow based on whether I know them personally, i.e. in life or from AW, for instance, or if they're a reputable site/publication.

I also follow a bunch of people on Twitter, organized into lists. Lots of them re-tweet smart stuff, as well as post their own links.

Siri Kirpal
12-08-2012, 12:59 AM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

There doesn't seem to be a single thread stickied anywhere here about how to write a nonfiction book proposal. We could use one in both the nonfiction and memoir forums, as well as here.

If you can't find a better expert, I'll give write it up, if you like.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

kingsley
12-14-2012, 06:02 AM
I hope someone "in charge" reads this.

I would like to see eCub (http://www.juliansmart.com/ecub) added to the list of useful publishing software. I use it for creating mobi and ePub files from HTML source, and i think it is the best available software for the DIY power user. It's also cross platform so it works on Mac, Windows, etc.

Just trying to give back some to the community!

Dennis E. Taylor
08-19-2014, 01:32 AM
I think we may need a meta-FAQ, or a FAQ that tells you where to find FAQs on given subjects - a FAQ-FAQ (that sounds like I'm angry. Oh, wait...)

It's become very fractured -- the problem isn't insufficient information, it's too much data.

Medievalist
08-19-2014, 06:05 AM
I think we may need a meta-FAQ, or a FAQ that tells you where to find FAQs on given subjects - a FAQ-FAQ (that sounds like I'm angry. Oh, wait...)

It's become very fractured -- the problem isn't insufficient information, it's too much data.

A dead giveaway is looking for subforums and threads with FAQ in their title.

Evelyn_Alexie
08-19-2014, 09:49 AM
Sometimes it must be a terrible temptation to throw up your hands and say "FAQ it all!"

That said, a FAQ TOC might help the clueless newbies such as moi.

blacbird
12-23-2014, 10:07 AM
And under Submission would come subheadings . . . I think . . . maybe? :Shrug:

Several:

Prayer
Goat-sacrifice
Visit to the crossroad on a moonless night
Copious weeping
Talisker or Laphroaig, neat


caw

WriteMinded
12-23-2014, 05:33 PM
Several:

Prayer
Goat-sacrifice
Visit to the crossroad on a moonless night
Copious weeping
Talisker or Laphroaig, neat


caw:D Already taken care of.

joanforder
08-29-2015, 12:25 PM
I'm really new to this topic and I keep hearing words like 'traditional', 'self-published', and 'hybrid' used. Could someone post a description or comparison between these publishing models?

Filigree
08-30-2015, 03:20 PM
(Mods, move if needed.) Someone else can tell you better than I can, probably. As I understand it, 'traditional' is generally a denigrating weasel-word attached to commercial publishing by some of its opponents (often strident self-published authors or vanity publishers.)

Commercial publishing is any venture where the author furnishes a manuscript and is paid in some combo of advances/royalties. The publisher does not charge the author, and takes its profits out of sales. While some authors may do various levels of promotion, they are not generally expected to do all of it. Small-press publishers can blur this line by making their authors do more promo and sales work. It's up to authors to decide how much extra work they're willing to do. Always a good idea to ask such publishers what they're doing to earn their cut of sales income...before believing hype and signing contracts!

Self-publishing requires the author to do or subcontract all the work a commercial publisher would offer: various levels of editing, formatting, book design, cover design, pricing, printing for physical copies, distribution, marketing and promotion, and working with sales portals. Some parts of the equation can be free, some may require substantial investment by the author. Again, research.

'Hybrid' is a dangerous term for new/inexperienced authors. When used by some vanity publishers, 'hybrid' seems to mean a publisher who 'offers' both commercial (advance and/or royalty paid to author) publishing *and* subsidy publication where the author contributes all or some of the publishing costs. Subsidy publishers hate being called vanity publishers, but that's what they are. They make most of their profit from selling goods and services to their authors; any income from actual book sales to readers is just extra profit.

To the rest of us, 'hybrid' simply means an split earnings potential where an author can have some books commercially published, and some that they've self-published on their own.

A good recent example is the case of Ellora's Cave, an exotic romance publisher currently involved in a libel lawsuit with a critic, as well as numerous author disagreements. Many authors have bought back or forced the return of their rights to publish their EC books, and now plan on re-releasing those novels as self-published works. Many of those authors also work with other commercial romance publishers, making them 'hybrid' authors.