PDA

View Full Version : Psychology Question



Fallen
04-13-2012, 03:58 PM
I was wondering if anyone knew the technical term for someone who, on seeing a message that says 'Don't touch that', will be compelled to touch.

And if anyone has links to any reputable articles... (biiiiig reps)

Thanking yous. :)

Edit: An adult that's taken normal human reaction beyond what's considered (hate the word) normal and safe. It's tied to sexual relations and agressive behaviour for the MC

alleycat
04-13-2012, 04:02 PM
I'm no expert, but possibly obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or just a compulsive neurosis.

Wait for a better answer.

Archerbird
04-13-2012, 04:13 PM
Someone with poor impulse control, like ADHD/ADD.

A person with OCD might do that, seeing as someone with OCD often have poor impulse control as well. I think it even overlaps with some of the impulse control disorders?

theelfchild
04-13-2012, 04:22 PM
It wouldn't be OCD - those are ritualized compulsions intended to relieve anxiety. ADD could involve that, though not always.
ODD (oppositional defiant disorder) would definitely involve compulsions of that sort, though that is a childhood disorder (I think exclusively) and is probably due mostly to poor environment (read: bad parenting).
If I come across anything when I get around to studying for Abnormal Psychology (exam's in a week... oops), I'll come back and let you know.

Archerbird
04-13-2012, 05:57 PM
It wouldn't be OCD - those are ritualized compulsions intended to relieve anxiety. ADD could involve that, though not always.
ODD (oppositional defiant disorder) would definitely involve compulsions of that sort, though that is a childhood disorder (I think exclusively) and is probably due mostly to poor environment (read: bad parenting).



Disagreed, meaning that intrusive thoughts and ideas can come spontaneously and disappear the next minute in someone with OCD. It doesn't always rely on rituals.

Nothing is "always " in psychology. Someone with ADHD/ADD might get the impulse to push the big red button placed right in front of them. They might not. Good luck predicting that.

Ari Meermans
04-13-2012, 06:12 PM
Fallen, it sounds like a form of impulse control disorder. We're all susceptible to that when we're very young and curious. Most people grow out of it fairly early in life. Some few don't outgrow it at all, and quite of few of us will still succumb if the stimulus creates pressure enough to impel us to act. For instance--and as embarrassing as it is to admit--even into my early twenties I could not resist the impulse to topple a pyramid display of paper products such as paper towels or bath tissue. I've since conquered that, but it provided me no end of difficulty til I did. LOL

JimmyB27
04-13-2012, 07:33 PM
"Some humans would do anything to see if it was possible to do it. If you put a large switch in some cave somewhere, with a sign on it saying "End-of-the-World Switch. PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH", the paint wouldn't even have time to dry." - Terry Pratchett

Sorry, I know that's not helpful at all, but: :nothing

Ari Meermans
04-13-2012, 07:45 PM
"Some humans would do anything to see if it was possible to do it. If you put a large switch in some cave somewhere, with a sign on it saying "End-of-the-World Switch. PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH", the paint wouldn't even have time to dry." - Terry Pratchett

Sorry, I know that's not helpful at all, but: :nothing

I don't remember ever meeting Terry Pratchett. Must have, though, 'cause that's my character down pat.

Fallen
04-14-2012, 04:37 AM
Excellent feedback, guys. It's awkward asking for info on something when I don't know what that something is.



Fallen, it sounds like a form of impulse control disorder. We're all susceptible to that when we're very young and curious. Most people grow out of it fairly early in life. Some few don't outgrow it at all, and quite of few of us will still succumb if the stimulus creates pressure enough to impel us to act. For instance--and as embarrassing as it is to admit--even into my early twenties I could not resist the impulse to topple a pyramid display of paper products such as paper towels or bath tissue. I've since conquered that, but it provided me no end of difficulty til I did. LOL

:D at 37, I still haven't got over the 'Don't touch these chocolates' yet. I can sympathise with you. ;) On a serious side, something like an impulsive control disorder would be along the lines of what this guy is about.

Hell, :rant: I thought English grammar had shaded areas.... But if there are no absolutes.... hmmmmm. ;)

ArtsyAmy
04-14-2012, 05:30 AM
I was wondering if anyone knew the technical term for someone who, on seeing a message that says 'Don't touch that', will be compelled to touch.

And if anyone has links to any reputable articles... (biiiiig reps)

Thanking yous. :)

Agreed that someone with poor impulse control might have trouble not touching it. Agreed that somene with OCD might feel compelled to touch it, but not necessarily--might not obsess about it at all. Thinking back to my former adolescent clients who'd been diagnosed with ODD--nah, I don't think they'd necessarily touch, especially if nobody was around to see that they were touching when they weren't supposed to be.

kuwisdelu
04-14-2012, 08:32 AM
I was wondering if anyone knew the technical term for someone who, on seeing a message that says 'Don't touch that', will be compelled to touch.

"Human."

Rufus Coppertop
04-14-2012, 12:58 PM
Buggerationary Recalcitrance Disorder.

http://www.whackapedia/diagnostic_ (http://www.whackapedia/diagnostic)criteria_in_the_psychometric_testing_of _complete_bastards/

Anaximander
04-14-2012, 03:29 PM
I was wondering if anyone knew the technical term for someone who, on seeing a message that says 'Don't touch that', will be compelled to touch.)
A child?

Fallen
04-14-2012, 04:08 PM
"Human."


A child?

Sorry, should've explained better: An adult that's taken normal human reaction beyond what's considered (hate the word) normal and safe. It's tied to sexual relations and agressive behaviour for the MC.

ArtsyAmy
04-14-2012, 08:47 PM
It might be helpful for you to try to get your hands on a copy of the DSM-IV--maybe your local library would have a copy? Just in case you haven't heard of the book, that's the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th Edition (the latest edition as far as I know, but I've been out of the field for a while). It's the book psychologists use to make diagnoses. On the other hand, if you use psycho-jargon, would your readers know what your talking about?

I'm not sure I'm understanding correctly, but perhaps the situation is that the "don't touch" refers to a person that the character should stay away from, but he's being "aggressive" toward her instead (yikes, I understand we have some young people here and I'm trying to be careful how I put things). Maybe he is obsessed and has poor impulse control--would that be a way you could put it in your story? Or maybe he's "sexually aggressive"? Perhaps your character has a history of poor impulse control and violence, and of using poor jugement in his interractions with women, and you could let your readers know that. Not sure if this is much help--wish I could be more helpful.

Fallen
04-15-2012, 02:03 AM
It's just so I can read up and get to grips with it before I go into a storyline.... Oooh, hang on, I'll ask...

archetypewriting
04-15-2012, 06:22 AM
I second the "impulse-control disorder" diagnosis.

Kenn
04-15-2012, 02:14 PM
Impulsivity is a trait and not a disorder. Anyone on here who says they have never acted rashly is a liar (but it does not mean they have a disorder because they have).

'Heightened impulsivity' is probably the term you are looking for, unless he has genuine problem controlling himself. His impulsivity could be (and probably is) a symptom of another mental disorder and such behaviour has been correlated to number of these.

I suppose the real question has to do with why he pressed the button (and why you keep eating chocolates ;)).

Have a look at these (scroll down past the summaries).

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2923549/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2716408/

Another thing to search for is the Barrett Impulsivity score.

Happy reading.

Ari Meermans
04-15-2012, 05:49 PM
Kenn, we're not calling impulsivity a disorder; the disorder stems from an inability to exert control over the impulse.

archetypewriting, your book is exactly what I've been looking for and I'm getting it tomorrow. I've read several books but they each seemed to focus on a specific psychosis, and I hadn't found one I felt met the needs of a writer. Thank you so much for posting on this thread.

rsiquet
04-15-2012, 08:48 PM
"Human."
:roll:

Kenn
04-16-2012, 12:00 AM
Kenn, we're not calling impulsivity a disorder; the disorder stems from an inability to exert control over the impulse.
Impulsivity is a predisposition to act rapidly or in an unplanned manner (it is, thus, indistiguishable from an inability to exert control over an impulse). The point is, it only becomes a disorder if it seriously affects the lifestyle of the person.

On a lighter note, even Dr Who reckons he has an impulsive streak.
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xm53t5_doctor-who-great-big-threatening-button_tech?search_algo=1

archetypewriting
04-16-2012, 07:18 AM
Ari, I wish I could "like" your post. :D

If you need help with anything after you do some reading, there's a web link listed in the Conclusion where you can find me, or you can always use the links at the bottom of my posts here on AW!

Archerbird
04-16-2012, 10:46 AM
Impulsivity is a predisposition to act rapidly or in an unplanned manner (it is, thus, indistiguishable from an inability to exert control over an impulse). The point is, it only becomes a disorder if it seriously affects the lifestyle of the person.



It's both, you're just picking on definitions here. :)

Though, I can't really agree with this:


(it is, thus, indistiguishable from an inability to exert control over an impulse)

when



An Impulse Control Disorder can be loosely defined as the failure to resist an impulsive act or behaviour that may be harmful to self or others. (http://www.forensicpsychiatry.ca/impulse/overview.htm#distinguish)



I don't know about you, but I'm very much aware of my impulses and consider myself to have pretty good control over them. I'm not alone.

Robbie
04-16-2012, 11:36 AM
Impulsive/compulsive behaviour problems are usually part of a wider set of problems that would come under something called a "disorder", eg "Borderline Personality Disorder". Alot of the individual traits are present in most of us to at some point in our lives, I reckon. People can read way too much into these things, though they are endlessly fascinating....

Fallen
04-16-2012, 12:32 PM
Excellent information, guys. I can see it's a shaded area. But the links and the discussion is helping loads.

@Robbie Welcome to AW, honey ;)

steamforged
04-17-2012, 04:51 AM
I'm a terrible person and feel the need to jump in with a monkeywrench (which is, itself, topical).

What you describe could be attributed to lack of impulse control, as others have mentioned. To expand on options, frontal lobe brain damage can also impair impulse control. Look up Phineas Gage for an example of a famous, but extreme, case. Fetal alcohol syndrome is another possibility that I haven't seen mentioned.

However, it could also be attributed to consciously oppositional behavior, which sounds a bit closer to the mark. Instead of pressing the button before considering the consequences, an oppositional person would see the sign and press the button specifically because they're told not to. Theelfchild mentioned ODD, and that's a good possibility. I'd also look through the various antisocial disorders. The following Wikipedia article is a good jumping-off point:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conduct_disorder

In your original post, you say:


Edit: An adult that's taken normal human reaction beyond what's considered (hate the word) normal and safe. It's tied to sexual relations and agressive behaviour for the MC

In some ways, that makes me think of antisocial personal disorder. There's a more popularized term for a person with that: psychopath. I know that word conjures images of American Psycho and Dexter, but antisocial personality disorder doesn't necessarily equate to murder and torture. It can manifest on a wholly social level, or with less-than-murderous levels of physical aggression. Take a read-through of this Wikipedia article if you're interested:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antisocial_personality_disorder

Note that one diagnostic criterion is prior diagnosis of childhood conduct disorders.

I hope all that's helpful! It could very well be that impulsivity fits best, but I thought you might like to see some other options.

Robbie
04-17-2012, 12:18 PM
Hey Fallen :) Thank you!

Fallen
04-19-2012, 07:20 PM
I'm a terrible person and feel the need to jump in with a monkeywrench (which is, itself, topical).

What you describe could be attributed to lack of impulse control, as others have mentioned. To expand on options, frontal lobe brain damage can also impair impulse control. Look up Phineas Gage for an example of a famous, but extreme, case. Fetal alcohol syndrome is another possibility that I haven't seen mentioned.

However, it could also be attributed to consciously oppositional behavior, which sounds a bit closer to the mark. Instead of pressing the button before considering the consequences, an oppositional person would see the sign and press the button specifically because they're told not to. Theelfchild mentioned ODD, and that's a good possibility. I'd also look through the various antisocial disorders. The following Wikipedia article is a good jumping-off point:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conduct_disorder

In your original post, you say:



In some ways, that makes me think of antisocial personal disorder. There's a more popularized term for a person with that: psychopath. I know that word conjures images of American Psycho and Dexter, but antisocial personality disorder doesn't necessarily equate to murder and torture. It can manifest on a wholly social level, or with less-than-murderous levels of physical aggression. Take a read-through of this Wikipedia article if you're interested:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antisocial_personality_disorder

Note that one diagnostic criterion is prior diagnosis of childhood conduct disorders.

I hope all that's helpful! It could very well be that impulsivity fits best, but I thought you might like to see some other options.

Thank you, hon. That was a big help.

And welcome to AW too ;)

benbradley
04-19-2012, 07:38 PM
Here, I knew I had heard of it - This is from The Mayo Clinic, So It Must Be True And Correct. I've got some sign around here somewhere...

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/oppositional-defiant-disorder/DS00630


Oh, wait here it is, borrowing from P&CE: :sarcasm

steamforged
04-19-2012, 09:44 PM
Thank you, hon. That was a big help.

And welcome to AW too ;)

Glad I could make a meaningful contribution, and thank you for the welcome! :)