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alexalex
04-03-2012, 02:42 AM
I have the opportunity to submit my mss to the senior most agent of a major publishing house by someone high up in the industry (but not an agent) who has read my book and feels that it would be a match for the said editor’s current interests. And they are willing to(and able to) submit the book on my behalf directly to the senior editor.
I feel that it would behoove me to go through an agent.
I am currently in between agents, however.
Should I approach the four agents who are reading my full at the moment and inform them of this opportunity?
What are the pros and cons?
Thank you for your thoughts.

Deb Kinnard
04-03-2012, 03:03 AM
Sure, I'd tell 'em. But I'd give them the option one at a time -- I'd start with my top-listed agent, and give him/her the opportunity. I'd also try to communicate the sense that this is time-sensitive (if it is) and if he/she cannot get to it promptly, thank the agent and move on to #2 on your short list.

May your work find extreme favor!

gettingby
04-03-2012, 04:21 AM
I wouldn't contact any of the agents until you here from the editor at the publishing house. If he is already going to read it, you wouldn't need an agent to step in until the contract. If the editor rejects it, you are still waiting to hear what the agents think, and then they can send it to different editors.

alexalex
04-04-2012, 02:53 AM
Gettingby,

if the editor does pass and an agent later does offerrepresentation later on, I am going to have to tell them about this submission and they may not like the fact that I have exhausted one of their major sources already. Would this be reason enough to include them upfront?

Thanks, Deb Kinnard, I, too, am hoping to find favor, one way or another.

Debbie V
04-10-2012, 12:41 AM
Alex,

If you were mentioning a dozen editors, that would be one thing, but you're talking about one person. Agents expect you to meet editors at conferences etc and have a submission or two on any given manuscript. Use the contact you have unless you don't feel it's good enough. This person hand carrying for you is no different than an agent doing so. Either could be wrong or right. Perhaps you can keep your 15% for yourself on this one and skip the agent. If you need one to negotiate for you, the above advice works fine. I say, go for it.

lauralam
04-10-2012, 03:20 AM
Alex,

If you were mentioning a dozen editors, that would be one thing, but you're talking about one person. Agents expect you to meet editors at conferences etc and have a submission or two on any given manuscript. Use the contact you have unless you don't feel it's good enough. This person hand carrying for you is no different than an agent doing so. Either could be wrong or right. Perhaps you can keep your 15% for yourself on this one and skip the agent. If you need one to negotiate for you, the above advice works fine. I say, go for it.

Bolding mine.

Agents may cost 15% but they are more than worth it. They can be another initial editor or someone to bounce ideas off of. They can get you a higher advance and better royalty rates, which in the long run even out to a lot more than 15%. I got 90% of the way to my deal myself and I could have done it without an agent, but I'm glad I have an agent. When you have a new project, they know who to send it to and can sub it widely. If you don't have an agent, you only have contact with one publisher, or maybe a few more if you have other contacts. But an agent does this 24/7. They know their stuff.

But, also, that said, if you get an offer, you might be able to get an agent to negotiate for you. You'll definitely get any interested agents to give you an answer a lot sooner, in any case.

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