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padnar
04-02-2012, 12:19 PM
HI,
i am planing to write a short on western genre . my detective starts his journey from San Francisco .
pl list me the names of villages towns and cities,
he will travel,to go along this trail.

All help are appreciated and thanks
padma

WriteKnight
04-02-2012, 03:52 PM
Please list the year and the direction he is travelling. San Francisco is located on the tip of a Peninsula, surrounded by water on three sides. In other words, if he went 'west' - he would have to swim across the Pacific.\

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Gold_Rush

Puma
04-02-2012, 05:14 PM
I suggest you look at a map of California or a road atlas to figure out the answer to your question. You could also use mapquest to get some ideas although Google Earth is much better because it gives you more idea of terrain. Puma

jclarkdawe
04-03-2012, 12:01 AM
The Great Western Trail can be read about here: Great Western Trail official site (http://www.gwt.org/). Problem for you is it didn't exist in your time period. The Great Western Cattle Trail roughly runs the same route as the Chisholm Trail, but to the west of it. So right off the bat, I have no idea what you're looking for.

As stated, San Francisco is pretty much surrounded by water. Most likely he would have headed east on a steamboat up the Sacramento River. From there, he could pick up the California Trail or the Oregon Trail. There are several passes over the Sierra Nevada range, including the Donner Trail.

Time period matters a lot here, as does destination. In 1849, it was frequently faster to take a boat and cross at Panama then it was to ride cross-country. And early travel before the railroad tended to use either the Oregon Trail and come south at the end or the Butterfield Trail and come north. The Sierra Nevada's are one tough mountain range to cross. And the only reason the railroad went through there was not engineering logic but politics.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

padnar
04-03-2012, 07:00 AM
Thanks for the suggestions.It is quite contemporary . All I want to know is the terrain. I am reading a lot of books on western genre and also looked at the map but still I find it difficult .
Actually it is a prompt and that motivated me to write .
How should the detective travel ? Is horse riding a must?
He is an Indian and is following a kidnapping case.pl help and thanks

Puma
04-03-2012, 04:16 PM
It is quite contemporary . Then you'd primarily be looking at existing roads and car travel. All I want to know is the terrain. Google earth or mapquest on satellite view will show you terrain. I am reading a lot of books on western genre contemporary does not equal western genre - it sounds like you're talking about a contemporary story set in the west How should the detective travel ? Contemporary would be whatever works for the situation - car, ATV, helicopter Is horse riding a must? Not for contemporary, but, it can also depend on what type of terrain you put your story in.
He is an Indian and is following a kidnapping case. pl help and thanks Hope that helps. Puma

jclarkdawe
04-03-2012, 05:18 PM
Major transportation route in the present day is Interstate 80 for east/west traffic. You have the coastal area, then the Central Valley, which takes you to about Auburn, and then you start climbing the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Central Valley is lush in vegetation and farmlands, and runs north/south in direction.

The Sierra Nevada on their western slopes are heavily timbered, while on their eastern slopes are less so and rather dry. Significant amounts of the Sierra Nevada are above the timber line and it's not unusual to find pockets of snow well into the summer.

There are definitely places in the Sierra Nevada where the only means of transport are either foot or horse. But he'd better be very experienced in riding if he tries this area. It's not unknown in this area for riders to lose their horses down the slopes, and about the only thing you can do is shoot the horse and hike out.

There are very specific Indian tribes in this area, and there is a vast difference between the tribes and how they deal with Whites, more so then, but even now. In the present day, this is more noticeable east of Sacramento, and the further you get towards Nevada, the more pronounced this becomes.

There are a lot of books on both the Central Valley and the Sierra Nevada mountains with lots of pretty pictures. It's also a great place to go on vacation. There are also quite a few members of AW in this area. Take a look at AW Members Listed by... (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?goto=newpost&t=69510) You might want to try sending them a PM.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Lehcarjt
04-05-2012, 04:39 AM
I live not far from SF, have traveled / camped a good lot of California, and write about the area in a historical context (1880). Feel free to PM me.

(I'm somewhat unclear if your story is historical or contemporary.)

Lehcarjt
04-05-2012, 04:48 AM
which takes you to about Auburn Auburn isn't considered central valley, but foothills to the Sierras.

Central Valley is lush in vegetation and farmlands, and runs north/south in direction. Nope (I can't believe I actually am correcting you. I'm not sure I've ever done it before). The Central Valley is hot and dry with great soil. Modern farming has turned it into some of the best producing land on the planet, but I would never call it lush. Visually, it mostly just looks flat and dry.


.

jclarkdawe
04-05-2012, 05:08 AM
. Originally Posted by jclarkdawe http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=7159556#post7159556)
which takes you to about Auburn Auburn isn't considered central valley, but foothills to the Sierras. It's been a few years since I last drove 80. I couldn't remember whether Auburn was valley or foothills, but knew it was near the line.

Central Valley is lush in vegetation and farmlands, and runs north/south in direction. Nope (I can't believe I actually am correcting you. I'm not sure I've ever done it before). More people should correct me. I'm often wrong. The Central Valley is hot and dry with great soil. Modern farming has turned it into some of the best producing land on the planet, but I would never call it lush. Visually, it mostly just looks flat and dry. I always come into it from the east. After Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming it looks lush. Sometime I'll have to try flying in and heading East from San Francisco. I'll agree with you on the hot, though. I always notice that, especially in winter.

Listen to her more then me. I've driven it a few times, but never lived in the area.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Royal Mercury
04-05-2012, 10:16 PM
HI,
i am planing to write a short on western genre . my detective starts his journey from San Francisco .
pl list me the names of villages towns and cities,
he will travel,to go along this trail.

All help are appreciated and thanks
padma

What is he trying to do? That's what drives your story. Where is he trying to go?

If it's a western genre, why not start in Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Wyoming or other locations more associated with the west?