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Namatu
03-29-2012, 06:49 PM
An interesting article (http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2012/03/21/speed-and-retention-are-e-readers-slower-and-more-forgetful/)on e-readers and information retention.

From the article:

In a study from 2011, Kate Garland and colleagues found that print readers understood topics more quickly, had more accessible retention (it just “came to them” when asked), and worked through material more quickly. However, digital readers caught up to them ultimately in nearly every way, with recall being the most elusive.Personally, I retain information better if I write it down, and there's some material I do prefer to read in print rather than on a screen. If I'm working on a dense manuscript, I often print it out and can get through it more quickly.

Thoughts?

heyjude
03-29-2012, 10:35 PM
This is really fascinating article. The thing that struck me the most was about the cover: I never realized how much the cover of the book identified its contents for me until now. Now I see the relationship and understand why have such a hard time identifying and remembering the coverless books on my ereader.

Soccer Mom
03-29-2012, 10:54 PM
Interesting. I prefer print when dealing with reference materials and when reading non-fiction. Perhaps it's because I do seem to retain the info better. I also find that I read much faster on my ereader which probably has something to do with absorbing and retaining information.

Namatu
03-29-2012, 11:28 PM
I also find that I read much faster on my ereader which probably has something to do with absorbing and retaining information.I've noticed the same thing. Most of what's on my Nook is fiction. The nonfiction has so far largely stayed in the TBR queue.

Drachen Jager
03-29-2012, 11:39 PM
All kinds of information retention work better the more senses they engage. A book engages our sense of touch while flipping pages so I can see how that might help. The smell of a book might help as well.

They did a big research project on this a few years ago, children and adults were taught an entirely new language and had to remember ten words. One group was given objects with the words to look at, but not touch or interact with (banana for instance), the other group was encouraged to pick each item up, smell it whatever. The second group performed far better when tested immediately after and two weeks after.

jennontheisland
03-30-2012, 09:15 AM
I've noticed this myself with my textbooks. Last two semesters I did ebooks only and I do find I'm re-reading more than I do with the paper versions. It is handy to have them in my laptop, which I carry around anyway, but I can't fold pages down, make margin notes, and flip back and forth between questions and tables of data.

I've decided that next year, I'm actually going to invest in the doorstoppers.

muravyets
03-30-2012, 09:25 AM
I'm a migraine sufferer and light patterns are one of my triggers. Recently, during a migraine, the light off my computer screen in a well lit office space gave me motion sickness.

The screens of e-readers are supposed to be designed to avoid problems of visual disturbance such as I experience when I have a migraine. I find they don't make me sick, but I still do get eye fatigue and headaches from looking at them.

I believe this is because any lighted screen of any kind -- any light source, really, especially artificial ones like screens -- will have infinitesimal, imperceptible flickering, and that is an irritant. It's like a micro version of the strobing of light and shadow that plunges me into full migraine hell when, for example, riding in a bus at 4:00pm when the shadows lengthen across the road. That flickering, no matter how faint, strains the eyes more than print and creates a built-in subliminal distraction element.

I believe this may have something to do with the slower retention of material with e-readers.

Obviously, by the way, I prefer print.

Namatu
03-30-2012, 06:51 PM
I'm a migraine sufferer and light patterns are one of my triggers. Recently, during a migraine, the light off my computer screen in a well lit office space gave me motion sickness. That sounds awful. :(


I believe this is because any lighted screen of any kind -- any light source, really, especially artificial ones like screens -- will have infinitesimal, imperceptible flickering, and that is an irritant.I think you have a point here. I chose my e-reader specifically for the e-ink experience, but 98% of my work days are spent in front of a computer, which I can no longer see clearly without glasses. I can read a book fine unaided, but not the computer screen.