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View Full Version : How should I go about mailing a 608 page manuscript?



chekzchevov
03-25-2012, 01:17 AM
Thanks for the advices

Cyia
03-25-2012, 01:22 AM
A binder is "bound". You get a mailing box (one of those flat rate boxes should work, and mail it in that.

chekzchevov
03-25-2012, 01:30 AM
A binder is "bound". You get a mailing box (one of those flat rate boxes should work, and mail it in that.

Oh, I didn't know. I thought they meant like, don't staple it. Which I wouldn't....

Box sounds nice. I'll pick one up at the post office.

blacbird
03-25-2012, 10:55 AM
600 pages might be a bit thick for a USPS flat rate box. But they're free, so you can pick up one and check. A standard ream of paper is 500 sheets, and is around 2 inches thick, to give you some idea.

caw

BenPanced
03-25-2012, 11:34 AM
One of the larger boxes might work. I think they're thicker than the standard manuscript box.

blacbird
03-25-2012, 11:53 AM
An ancillary matter: Whatever you do, don't send the thing in any manner that requires a signature for receipt. That is a sure recipe for getting your submission binned.

caw

jaksen
03-25-2012, 06:21 PM
Wow, they have asked for the whole thing?

Edit, yep, I see they want the whole thing for their novel submission. Wow.

jclarkdawe
03-25-2012, 06:27 PM
First off plan for a long day at Kinkos.

Second is copy each page of your manuscript, then laminating each page (both sides). This way when the agent spits coffee over your beautiful prose, the agent will be able to wipe the page off, hopefully leaving your prose in pristine shape. Never mind that this is expensive and takes time -- your writing is worth it. The fact that the agent can't make notes on the paper is not your concern.

Third is take each chapter and bind it carefully in rubber bands. You need ten rubber bands length wise and five rubber bands width wise. Remember, rubber bands break, and you want to err on the side of caution. Never mind that the agent will get irked at all the rubber bands, protecting your valuable manuscript is important. After you have all the rubber bands on, carefully wrap each chapter in plastic wrap. At least five layers so if there is any rain it won't get through to your perfect book. Remember that making sure your document is perfect is important. And the agent is going to be impressed by all the care you've exerted.

Fourth, take all of your chapters and strap them together with the strapping used for boxes of paper. Again, a ten by five system works well here. You don't want a strap breaking and causing problems. Remember, protection of the world's next best seller is paramount here. Take the entire manuscript and wrap carefully in bubble wrap. Multiple layers so that if the shipping container is punctured, none of your brilliant words will be compromised.

Now we can move onto the shipping container. Some people feel that there is a choice involved here. Some people feel that a one-inch oak chest is enough, screwed closed. Others feel that a quarter-inch steel case, welded shut, is the best choice. Both are in fact wrong. You start off with the oak chest and insert it into the steel case, making sure that the entire package is air and water tight.

Shipping agent can be a difficult choice. Some people believe that the post office works, while others swear by FedEx. Personally I know people who have sworn at both, as their manuscript gets lost or damaged in the process, causing an agent to reject it. Personally I believe that driving it to the agent is the only route, especially if you have to go overseas. Remember that you have to keep visual sight of your precious writing no matter what. Sleep is dangerous, as someone might steal the next Pulitzer prize winner, to publish it under their name.

Following these steps will guarantee the agent will be amazed at the care with which you've delivered your priceless manuscript. The agent will be able to make a decision sight unseen, as no one but a special writer would go to this extent to protect their manuscript.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

thothguard51
03-25-2012, 06:48 PM
Dalton,

Unsure of where you are at in your writing journey, but here are a few hints to think about...

DAW is one of the big boys that an unagented writer can submit too. But expect anywhere from 6 months to a year for the submission process with DAW.

180,000 words is a very wordy book for a new author for any publisher to consider. You say its around 600 pages but my my calculations, at the standard 250 words per page divide by 180,000 I come up with 720 pages and that does not include title, index, or pages less than 250, such as chapter opening, closing.

Are you sure you have formatted as per the DAW requirements because this is going to matter to the DAW editors.

My suggestion is to make sure your manuscript is properly formatted, and that you have as few formatting problems as possible, including making sure you have gone over the entire manuscript and checked it for not just punctuation, spelling, and grammar usage, but also to make sure you are not overly redundant and have consistent PoV.

Good luck on this process, with DAW its very time consuming...

ironmikezero
03-26-2012, 12:12 AM
[QUOTE=jclarkdawe;7132047]First off plan for a long day at Kinkos.

Second is copy each page of your manuscript, then laminating each page (both sides). This way when the agent spits coffee over your beautiful prose, the agent will be able to wipe the page off, hopefully leaving your prose in pristine shape...[QUOTE]


Thanks a heap, Jim... I just sprayed coffee all over my keyboard - maybe I should've had it laminated...

:roll:

chekzchevov
03-26-2012, 07:38 PM
Dalton,

Unsure of where you are at in your writing journey, but here are a few hints to think about...

DAW is one of the big boys that an unagented writer can submit too. But expect anywhere from 6 months to a year for the submission process with DAW.

180,000 words is a very wordy book for a new author for any publisher to consider. You say its around 600 pages but my my calculations, at the standard 250 words per page divide by 180,000 I come up with 720 pages and that does not include title, index, or pages less than 250, such as chapter opening, closing.

Are you sure you have formatted as per the DAW requirements because this is going to matter to the DAW editors.

My suggestion is to make sure your manuscript is properly formatted, and that you have as few formatting problems as possible, including making sure you have gone over the entire manuscript and checked it for not just punctuation, spelling, and grammar usage, but also to make sure you are not overly redundant and have consistent PoV.

Good luck on this process, with DAW its very time consuming...

I've been eyeing DAW for two years. It's properly formatted

chekzchevov
03-26-2012, 07:40 PM
An ancillary matter: Whatever you do, don't send the thing in any manner that requires a signature for receipt. That is a sure recipe for getting your submission binned.

caw

Oh, I never even thought about that. I'll make sure that doesn't happen, thanks.

chekzchevov
03-26-2012, 09:54 PM
Nevermind

Terie
03-26-2012, 10:00 PM
Don't change your fonts. The manuscript needs to be easy on the very overworked eyes of the acquisitions editor, not something fancied up for normal-type readers. That's why the conventions are what they are: to make it easy read for people who read all day and a lot of the night, too.

And if you're relying on visual impact for your story to impress, you're in a bad place. Audiobooks don't have fonts, and most e-readers allow the user to change to preferred fonts.

The story is the words, not what the words look like.

chekzchevov
03-26-2012, 10:20 PM
Don't change your fonts. The manuscript needs to be easy on the very overworked eyes of the acquisitions editor, not something fancied up for normal-type readers. That's why the conventions are what they are: to make it easy read for people who read all day and a lot of the night, too.

And if you're relying on visual impact for your story to impress, you're in a bad place. Audiobooks don't have fonts, and most e-readers allow the user to change to preferred fonts.

The story is the words, not what the words look like.

Thanks for the reassurance.

thothguard51
03-26-2012, 10:24 PM
I didn't want to waste space by started a new thread and most of you in this thread seem to know what you're talking about, so one last thing:


Should I really keep the font and font sizes consistent through my entire manuscript? I know that this is preferred (and I would expect it to be especially preferred by a big dog like DAW), but there are just some places where italics, bolds, and complete font changes just make the story better and more engrossing during the read.

YES...once the publication accepts the manuscript, you can then talk to the editor about changing fonts for the reasons you note below.

For example, there are 3 arcs to my story. I label them accordingly with the Arienne font with a slightly larger font size than the rest of the story which is, of course, 12 pt. font Times New Roman. Should I really change these 3 locations to 12 pt. TNR as well? It's just boring and placid looking.

This is a Gimmick and editors generally hate gimmicks. The story has to speak to the editor, not the gimmicks used to awe the average reader...


But like I said, if this is what they prefer, then that's what they'll get. I've heard and read that manuscripts should contain no italics, bolds, or any variations in fonts while I've also heard the opposite. And DAW's website doesn't really state it clearly.

This was true in the old days, when no one had word processors and computers. Today though you can use italics, bold, etc in the submission process. My problem is the font you use, Times new Roman, and using bold and italics can often cause a line to look off from the rest of the page because the characters are not standard widths and heights like Courier or New Courier.

This also explains why your manuscript is only 600 pages instead of the 720 pages I came up with. And yes, it matters that much as with TNR and the standard 1" borders with double spaces, you come up with more than 250 words per page. The publisher will really decide what font to use in the book. Some publishers will decide to use a large font size to increase the number of pages while other might decrease the size to reduce the number of pages. It is their choice, not the authors. Personally, I would keep with standard formatting during submission processes.

And just for clarification, this is NOT my first submission. I've submitted both ways before. I'm just real nervous with this one because.... well, it's DAW.

Like I said, expect anywhere from 6 months to a year for the submission process, and in my experience, the later is the more reasonable. DAW is very selective and they go over any submissions they like with a review board before they even contact the author. My experiences with DAW have all been encouraging, even though they did not buy the manuscript...

Again, thanks for the input in advance.

While you're waiting, I would work on something else so if they accept, you can have that second book ready to go out on submissions.

chekzchevov
03-26-2012, 11:06 PM
While you're waiting, I would work on something else so if they accept, you can have that second book ready to go out on submissions.

On it

chekzchevov
03-27-2012, 12:21 AM
nvm

Bufty
03-27-2012, 02:54 AM
I'd just stuff an old pair of underpants in to fill the gap. Washed, preferably.

And re the buff folder, - Jesus, man, stop asking such damned difficult questions.


On it already ;)

This is all very exciting, but I seem to have hit another snag. I'm sure most of you are familiar with the free postal mailing boxes you can pick up at the PO. I picked up a couple today (note that I am young and this past year has marked the beginning of my love/hate relationship with the local post office) and I now notice that if I just throw all of the pages in there, they're going to flop all over the place since the inside of the box is lengthier than the paper.

So, how should I contain the manuscript inside to stop this from happening? I'm borderline about to wrap this bitch is Christmas paper.

I've submitted excerpts many times before, but those have all been 10 to 40 pages at max and easily fit inside of an envelope. This, understandably, does not.

chekzchevov
03-27-2012, 03:47 AM
kk

Susan Littlefield
03-27-2012, 05:39 AM
First off plan for a long day at Kinkos.

Second is copy each page of your manuscript, then laminating each page (both sides). This way when the agent spits coffee over your beautiful prose, the agent will be able to wipe the page off, hopefully leaving your prose in pristine shape. Never mind that this is expensive and takes time -- your writing is worth it. The fact that the agent can't make notes on the paper is not your concern.

Third is take each chapter and bind it carefully in rubber bands. You need ten rubber bands length wise and five rubber bands width wise. Remember, rubber bands break, and you want to err on the side of caution. Never mind that the agent will get irked at all the rubber bands, protecting your valuable manuscript is important. After you have all the rubber bands on, carefully wrap each chapter in plastic wrap. At least five layers so if there is any rain it won't get through to your perfect book. Remember that making sure your document is perfect is important. And the agent is going to be impressed by all the care you've exerted.

Fourth, take all of your chapters and strap them together with the strapping used for boxes of paper. Again, a ten by five system works well here. You don't want a strap breaking and causing problems. Remember, protection of the world's next best seller is paramount here. Take the entire manuscript and wrap carefully in bubble wrap. Multiple layers so that if the shipping container is punctured, none of your brilliant words will be compromised.

Now we can move onto the shipping container. Some people feel that there is a choice involved here. Some people feel that a one-inch oak chest is enough, screwed closed. Others feel that a quarter-inch steel case, welded shut, is the best choice. Both are in fact wrong. You start off with the oak chest and insert it into the steel case, making sure that the entire package is air and water tight.

Shipping agent can be a difficult choice. Some people believe that the post office works, while others swear by FedEx. Personally I know people who have sworn at both, as their manuscript gets lost or damaged in the process, causing an agent to reject it. Personally I believe that driving it to the agent is the only route, especially if you have to go overseas. Remember that you have to keep visual sight of your precious writing no matter what. Sleep is dangerous, as someone might steal the next Pulitzer prize winner, to publish it under their name.

Following these steps will guarantee the agent will be amazed at the care with which you've delivered your priceless manuscript. The agent will be able to make a decision sight unseen, as no one but a special writer would go to this extent to protect their manuscript.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

:roll:

thothguard51
03-27-2012, 05:46 AM
Bubble wrap in one end of the box so the manuscript does not shift and get all crunched up...

Dreity
03-27-2012, 05:56 AM
...Personally I believe that driving it to the agent is the only route, especially if you have to go overseas...

Okay, the whole thing was great, but this line here still has me laughing even as I type.

*sees hapless writer jury-rigging a rudder, fan, and multiple lifeboats to his car* "What are you doing?"

"Submitting to the Big Six, motherf*****!"

ETA: Another vote for bubble wrap in one end. DO NOT ENCLOSE IN BUBBLE WRAP! x.x